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Zane

Thursday News: SCOTUS denies cert in Superman case, interview with Zane, Black women in British history exhibit, and Gif enhanced manuscripts

Thursday News: SCOTUS denies cert in Superman case, interview with Zane,...

That agreement was executed in the aftermath of Shuster’s death, when Peavy wrote to Warner subsidiary DC and asked the company to pay her brother’s final debts and expenses. DC agreed and also increased survivor benefits, but the company’s executive vp at the time, Paul Levitz, admonished, “This agreement would represent the author/heir’s last and final deal with DC and would fully resolve any past, present or future claims against DC.” –Hollywood Reporter

TR: Addicted pushed a lot of boundaries in its exploration of black women’s sexuality when it was released. How do you think the perception of black women’s sexuality has changed since Addicted came out?

Zane: I think women are more open about their feelings; they feel more liberated. I’ve had many women in their 40s and 50s tell me that they had never had an orgasm. Reading my books has made them open up enough to say what [they] want. If you really want someone to fall in love with you, the real you, you have to be transparent about who you are. And that includes your sexuality. There is nothing wrong with having desires—everybody has fantasies. –The Root

Now the organisers of an exhibition at the recently opened Black Cultural Archives (in Windrush Square in Brixton, south London) are hoping to skewer some myths regarding black life in the British Isles. The archives’ inaugural exhibition, Re-imagine: Black Women in Britain, has brought together a number of black women who made the country their home over the centuries. The stories of these women and their contributions to British life are a necessary corrective to the idea that we are somehow “new” to Britain. Consider Mary Prince, an enslaved woman from Bermuda – whose personal account of slavery was published in 1831, and was the first account of the life of a black woman in Britain. “I have been a slave myself,” she wrote. “The man that says slaves be quite happy in slavery – that they don’t want to be free – that man is either ignorant or a lying person. I never heard a slave say so.” She eventually lived and worked at the home of the Scottish writer Thomas Pringle, secretary of the Anti-Slavery Society. –The Guardian

Thursday News: Penguin’s new 13-year old author, NYT lament on YA, NoiseTrade’s free books, and Zane’s money woes

Thursday News: Penguin’s new 13-year old author, NYT lament on YA,...

Sedita said that he was “blown away” when he found out that the series, which will also feature illustrations, was written by a 12-year-old. The story, Sedita added, “reminded me of what it felt like to worry about finding the right classrooms, take impossible pop quizzes, and figure out the rules of popularity… and made me laugh the whole way through.” –Publishers Weekly

The way we yearn for the high end of this work makes the crassness of the current production model all the more infuriating. Young-adult literature is often, in our era, called the last refuge of “good stories.” We think of the best of these books as having a unique, if occasionally idiosyncratic, purity of form and content. That sort of argument actually predates us considerably. C. S. Lewis once wrote, in an oft-quoted article on his affection for the fairy tale, that he liked the form for “its brevity, its severe restraints on description, its flexible traditionalism, its inflexible hostility to all analysis, digression, reflections and ‘gas.’ ” Much if not all of this applies more widely to books ostensibly written for the young. Even we adults, like Lewis, appreciate that they avoid the baggage attached to the more self-evidently literary. –New York Times

{quote3:17)–NoiseTrade

The real-life twist on Zane’s success has left some of her readers wondering how Roberts — a well-known businesswoman who is publisher of Strebor Books, an imprint of Atria Books/Simon & Schuster, and creator and producer of two Cinemax television series, “Zane’s Sex Chronicles” and “Zane’s The Jump Off” — could end up in a financial mess worthy of a character in one of her novels. –Washington Post