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Tuesday News: New suit against Apple et al, the recession’s effect on the US economy, writer’s envy, and truly funny cat video

Tuesday News: New suit against Apple et al, the recession’s effect...

Judge Says Price-Fixing Suit Filed by Retailers Can Proceed – Judge Cote has ruled that an antitrust suit brought by independent bookseller DNAML against Apple et al can move forward, likely in tandem with Lavoho, LLC and Abbey House Media (formerly Diesel and Books on Board).

Question: Will these publishers ever get it? Amazon v. Hachette suggests maybe not.

Although Cote in her opinion said proving damages was going to be difficult “in the extreme” for the DNAML, she held that the plaintiff’s case met the standard to proceed. But while Cote suggested that proving damages might be difficult, she added that DNAML’s “lost investment,” in its business “may be reasonably quantifiable.”

“It is more than plausible that a discount retailer was harmed by a conspiracy to remove retailers’ ability to discount e-books,” the judge wrote in her order, adding that the retailers were “indisputably competitors in a market in which trade was restrained.” –Publishers Weekly

Here’s how the recession affected jobs in newsrooms, publishing, advertising, and more – 255 charts tell the story of “how the recession reshaped the economy,” including almost 500,000 jobs in traditional publishing lost, along with major losses (thus far unrecovered) in television, radio, and broadcast. Salaries for telecom resellers dipped the most, followed by salaries for those in newspaper publishing (not a big surprise). If you have like ten hours to spare, check out the charts. –Nieman Journalism Lab

Whose Writing Career Do You Most Envy? – These little Bookends pieces by Zoë Heller and Daniel Mendelsohn are sometimes pretty interesting, more, I think, for the questions and issues they raise, than for their actual answers. In this case, it’s what writer’s career do you envy, which bring up much philosophizing about how difficult it is to envy any writer’s career when you know too much about a writer, something that seems particularly poignant right now, with all the social media to which we have access. Still, some interesting questions around popularity and creativity, and how the patterns to many writers’ careers may be more similar than dissimilar.

The Greeks’ insistence that we consider the whole life before making final judgments has an interesting literary application. As a critic, I’m often struck by the way in which so many successful writers settle into a groove by midcareer: Whatever marked them as special, new, or distinctive when they started — the “thing” that set them on their path — becomes, with time, a franchise; at worst, a straitjacket. By the end, most of us repeat ourselves. Very few — perhaps only the greatest — continue to grow. Almost inevitably, the innovator of yesterday becomes the éminence grise of today. –New York Times

Nobody Believed Her When She Said Her Cat Does This. So She Set Up A Camera To Prove It. LOL! - I’m not usually one for cute cat videos, but this one is hilarious. Watch it, laugh, and enjoy the rest of your day. –Reshareworthy

Tuesday News: A hodgepodge of things to make you go hmmm

Tuesday News: A hodgepodge of things to make you go hmmm

BIC Cristal For Her Ball Pen, 1.0mm, Black, 16ct (MSLP16-Blk) – An oldie but still a goodie. Bic pens “for her,” yields some of the funniest reviews and questions/answers on the site (warning: massive time suck potential).

Someone has answered my gentle prayers and FINALLY designed a pen that I can use all month long! I use it when I’m swimming, riding a horse, walking on the beach and doing yoga. It’s comfortable, leak-proof, non-slip and it makes me feel so feminine and pretty! Since I’ve begun using these pens, men have found me more attractive and approchable. It has given me soft skin and manageable hair and it has really given me the self-esteem I needed to start a book club and flirt with the bag-boy at my local market –Amazon

A Pixar Artist Drew Classic R-Rated Film Scenes And Turned Them Into A “Children’s” Book – Josh Cooley’s upcoming book, Movies R Fun, takes iconic scenes from some of the most popular films and ‘translates’ them into formats you would find in children’s books. The description at Amazon claims that the book is a “sly celebration of the things fans love most about these legendary films (and movies in general),” although I’m hoping that Cooley is hoping to start a discussion about the way in which film provokes particular emotional effects on viewers and how Hollywood handles subjects like sex, violence, race, morality, etc. A Pixar storyboard artist, Cooley has worked on films such as Up, Cars, and Ratatouille. –BuzzFeed

Why bosses have stopped marrying their secretaries: Increasing numbers of high-flyers are choosing their academic equal for their partner – Yes, I know this is the Daily Mail. Still, I’m trying to decide whether this article is intended as parody or not. In some ways it’s pretty hilarious. And horrifying, too. My favorite quote is credited to a John Goldthorpe, emeritus fellow of Nuffield College, Oxford:

“Over the past 20 years women have caught up with men in the proportion going into higher education. They are going in their mating years and therefore universities are becoming big mating factories.” –Daily Mail

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators – There’s a lot here, some of which had me nodding in agreement (it’s very true, for example, that most of the spaces in higher ed right now are in less selective institutions), some of which had me thinking that the explanation was a little glibly, facilely, appealing (the imposter syndrome as applied to people who write for a living). I thought this comment on the nature of talent and challenge from Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck was pretty interesting, though:

“There was this eureka moment,” says Dweck. She now identifies the former group as people with a “fixed mind-set,” while the latter group has a “growth mind-set.” Whether you are more fixed or more of a grower helps determine how you react to anything that tests your intellectual abilities. For growth people, challenges are an opportunity to deepen their talents, but for “fixed” people, they are just a dipstick that measures how high your ability level is. Finding out that you’re not as good as you thought is not an opportunity to improve; it’s a signal that you should maybe look into a less demanding career, like mopping floors. –The Atlantic