REVIEW:  Fat by Saranna DeWylde

REVIEW: Fat by Saranna DeWylde

fat dewyldeDear Saranna DeWylde:

You and I both know that I’m a fan of your work – from the “How to…” series to the Desperate Housewives – I love them all. I was both thrilled and curious to see that you were coming out with something a little bit different, something that might even be considered a touch controversial – body image. This divisive topic is one that can be amazing if handled well, or utterly disastrous. To pair that with a contemporary romance is a somewhat risky proposition. It’s my not so humble opinion that you not only handled it well, you blew it out of the water.

fat dewyldeMeet Claire, the healthy, beautiful fashionista entrepreneur who just so happens to be larger than the media says is acceptable. All of her life she’s heard the standards, from “you’ve got such a pretty face,” to “you’re pretty, for a fat girl.” If there’s been a way to draw attention to weight and body size, Claire’s heard it. While she’s happy sharing a dwelling and companionship with man-whore exotic dancer Kieran, it’s not the intimacy of a romantic relationship. It takes Kieran’s night with Claire’s best friend, April, to open Claire’s eyes to the fact that she’s got romantic feelings for her roommate. But is it too late? Kieran’s introduced Claire to his coworker, slightly vertically challenged nice guy, Brant – and he’s really not as bad as she’d imagined. April’s had a ride on the Kieran-pony, and she’s now the one with the bit in her mouth (metaphorically, I promise). Can there be a chance for love when two people who are certain they’re broken collide? Can Claire take a leap of the heart as she’s taking a leap with a new business?

Sometimes, the hardest thing we can do is take a good, long, hard look in the mirror at ourselves and our preconceived notions. It doesn’t matter the size or gender, people are bombarded daily with ideas of what they “should” look like – in the stores, on television, on the side of a passing bus. And even those who find themselves on the more extreme ends of “don’t fit the stereotype,” those who feel marginalized, can be just as guilty of falling into the generalization trap. “Fat” does a beautiful job of not only reflecting that back, but also applying the soothing balm to that decided discomfort afterward. If I had to distill the message down to something simple, it would be “be you.” That’s it – it’s that simple.

I adore the secondary characters and loved following their stories right along with Claire’s. Kieran is one of my favorites. Those who work in the adult entertainment industry, whether it be on the pole or on camera, tend to be sensationalized as the ideal, physically. They’re perfect. They’re desirable. They’re for sale to the highest bidder. Kieran doesn’t do anything at all to disprove these notions and serves as an almost perfect foil for Claire. Claire is the woman who hides her insecurities with laughter and a glorious, outrageous sense of fashion. Kieran is the man who hides his (feelings and … other things) in every woman he comes across. It’s as though, while he’s unashamed, he realizes that his behavior is a coping mechanism. Here is this supposedly perfect man – and he’s in pretty much the same boat as Claire. April is another character who seemed to have it all – beauty, brains, men falling at her feet. Yet she, too, was struggling. I looked at April and went “I know her!” There were some eerily familiar notes resonating throughout the book that had me putting it aside to do some serious thinking.

But, lest you think I’m going to focus just on the “hard” parts of the book – never fear! The thoughtful parts were well balanced with witty, snappy dialogue, glorious clothing descriptions (I’m in no way, shape or form fashion-conscious, and even *I* wanted to head to the Chubbalicious website to order clothes – I’m so sad it’s not real), and the sense of fun and wonder that comes with a journey of self-discovery. It wasn’t just Claire’s journey – it was mine, as well. You managed to drag me out of my own world and drop me squarely in Claire’s – you made me care.

And that, to me, is worth the price of admission anytime. A-

Your Devoted Reader and Critic,

Mary Kate

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