Romance, Historical, Contemporary, Paranormal, Young Adult, Book reviews, industry news, and commentary from a reader's point of view

Twitter

Friday News: Has Twitpic been rescued?, Facebook’s algorithm change, National Book Award fiction long list, and Austenites get Guinness World Record

Friday News: Has Twitpic been rescued?, Facebook’s algorithm change, National Book...

“We’re happy to announce we’ve been acquired and Twitpic will live on! We will post more details as we can disclose them.”

As long as they haven’t sold to Facebook… –Gizmodo

The goal of News Feed is to show the right content to the right people at the right time. We’re always listening to feedback from people who use Facebook to do a better job of this. We’ve heard feedback that some content is timely content such as breaking news or an update to a sports game – and that we could do a better job of showing this at the time it’s most important. Today’s update aims to help solve this issue. –Gigaom

Five finalists in four categories – young people’s literature, poetry, nonfiction and fiction – will be announced on Oct. 15, and the winners will be recognized at an awards gala on Nov. 19 that will be hosted by Daniel Handler, a.k.a Lemony Snicket. –New York Times

To achieve the record the participants had to remain in position for a minimum of five minutes in full Regency attire with all those taking place with the necessary accessories to complete the outfit. –BBC

Monday News: California protects negative reviews, Twitter installs “buy” buttons, how books do or don’t affect us, and Ancillary Justice teas

Monday News: California protects negative reviews, Twitter installs “buy” buttons, how...

“Manipulating or attempting to silence authentic feedback impedes other consumers who use that content to make more informed purchase decisions,” Matt Krebsbach, Director of Global Public and Analyst Relations, tells the Daily Dot. “Just as important: Businesses that don’t acknowledge both positive and negative reviews create an environment consumers can’t wholly trust—and curtail the very opinions that could help them deliver the products and services their customers want.” –Daily Dot

Let’s step back and take a look at what we have here, from the consumer perspective. The sudden appearance of a social media “Buy” button gives the consumer a feeling of exclusivity—of somehow being selected and singled out as special. There will be pressure to act quickly or miss out on the deal at hand; by the time you shop around for similar offers, do some price comparisons, or fully think things through, that “Buy” button could be gone. What’s more, the act of purchasing is simply a tap or two on a phone, quicker and easier even than posting your latest brilliant random thoughts on Twitter. It doesn’t feel like spending real money at all. –Time

It has become popular to consider fiction in terms of empathy — how it can catalyze and deepen our awareness of lives beyond our own — but what if it can also catalyze other tendencies, other capacities or grooves of thought? Novels might not make us worse, but they can unlock parts of us that were already there, already dark, already violent or ruthless or self-destructive. People with eating disorders learn tricks from stories about anorexia. People with histories of drug abuse get triggered by stories of intoxication. –New York Times