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Tablets

Friday News: Kobo nixes tablets, grammar rules you can forget, libraries and Adobe ADE, and Agatha Christie’s jewels

Friday News: Kobo nixes tablets, grammar rules you can forget, libraries...

Tamblyn added that its “most valuable customer for us is the customer who reads on e-ink devices and tablets. They are worth 23% more to us in terms of sales”. . . .

Douglas McCabe, analyst with Enders Analysis based in London, said that Kobo needed to acquire exclusive content to be competitive in the e-reading market. “Kobo has to establish itself as the niche e-reader competitor to Amazon’s Kindle,” he said. “The tablet market has too many very successful players—Apple, Samsung, Sony, Google, Tesco, Amazon itself. Kobo is lost on that battlefield.” –The Bookseller

Classic style makes writing, which is necessarily artificial, as artificially natural as possible, if you’d pardon the oxymoron. That is, you’re not physically with someone when you write. You’re not literally having a conversation with them, but classic style simulates those experiences and so it takes an inherently artificial situation, namely writing, and it simulates a more natural interaction, the more natural interaction being (a) conversation (b) seeing the world. So two people in the same place, one of whom directs the other’s attention to something in the world, is a natural way in which two people interact and classic style simulates that. –New Republic

Librarians who have ebook collections need to inform their patrons right now that if they are using the latest Adobe Digital Editions software, their reading history, including ebooks they didn’t borrow from the library, belongs to Adobe and anyone else who’s watching. (See how librarians at Ryerson responded within 24 hours.) Next, they have to figure out what steps to take to fix the problem.Beyond that, we all need to have a serious conversation of whether our devotion to privacy is merely lip service, an old-fashioned hang-up we have decided doesn’t matter anymore and should scrub from the American Library Association website, or whether we will actually, you know, stand up for it. Because right now, that’s not happening. –Inside Higher Ed

Four years after buying the trunk, Mrs Grant had builders in and wrenched open the box with a crowbar.

Inside she found a purse of gold coins, a diamond brooch and a three-stone diamond ring, items that are mentioned in Agatha Christie’s biography as pieces earmarked for her and her sister Madge. –BBC

Monday News: Tablet sales decline, more self-publishing data scraping, Goodreads looks at unfinished books, and a Romance summer reading challenge

Monday News: Tablet sales decline, more self-publishing data scraping, Goodreads looks...

The study forecasts that in 2014 the year-on-year growth rate of tablet PC sales — once a primary growth driver for the smart device market, especially after the iPad debuted in 2010 — will fall 14%, a revised estimate that docked NPD’s original predicted growth rate by 3%. By 2017, the rate will slow to single digits. –Time

As an author, I was curious about the exact numbers of independent titles in certain genres. So, after scraping some eBook metadata from Amazon and Barnes & Noble, I compiled some interesting figures which reflect the trends of self-publishing over the last few months –I Hate The Sounds Around Me

The top five most abandoned contemporary books included J. K. Rowling’s “The Casual Vacancy,” “Fifty Shades of Grey,” and “Eat Pray Love.” “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” and “Wicked” were also frequently discarded.

And when it came to the most frequently started but unfinished books ever, they were all classics: “Catch-22,” “The Lord of the Rings,” “James Joyce’s Ulysses,” “Moby Dick,” and “Atlas Shrugged” were the five least-finished books. –Business Insider

To help you discover all the different possibilities within the genre of romance, we have put together this Romance Genres Check List. It breaks romance into smaller subgenres such as contemporary, historical and paranormal — and then breaks those categories down even further so you can check them off as you read. Make your own goal for the summer such as reading every subgenre of historical romance. That alone will take you from hunky highlanders to roguish dukes and Wild West gun slingers. Or give your taste buds even more to try by reading at least one from every one of the more general categories. Better yet, go whole hog and check off every box on the list. –Shelf Talk