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Simon & Schuster

Tuesday News: Simon & Schuster re-contracts with Amazon, the secrets to Half Price Books’ success, Designers sue ISPs over knock-offs, and Toni Morrison’s papers go to Princeton

Tuesday News: Simon & Schuster re-contracts with Amazon, the secrets to...

The agreement, which was revealed in a letter to the publisher’s writers, gives Simon & Schuster control over e-book pricing “with some limited exceptions,” according to the letter, which was signed by Simon & Schuster CEO Carolyn Reidy and obtained by the New York Times. The existing contract between Amazon and Simon & Schuster, which is owned by CNET parent CBS, was due to expire in two months. –CNET

Today we have our own publishing arm, and we produce our own stationery, calendars, and CD wallets to sell. Our wholesale division sells to museums, independent bookstores, and Barnes & Noble. We have five to six buyers traveling the country, buying remainders that we can sell at half price. If we buy too much, we sell the extras to Barnes & Noble or others. All of us in the book world feed off each other. There’s competition, but it’s all with great people.

The book industry has changed dramatically because of Amazon, e-readers, and tablets. Stores can’t ignore the fact that you can get just about any book you want while you’re in your pajamas, and it has had an effect on everyone. But there are still a lot of people who like to browse bookstores and be surprised by what they find. People like to handle paper. It’s the permanency of it. We did a survey, and our customers buy 37 books a year. With the recession, we closed three stores, but we’re still profitable. –Fortune

The defendants included British Sky Broadcasting Limited, British Telecommunications PLC, EE Limited, TalkTalk Telecom Limited and Virgin Media Limited, giving Richemont a broad swath of security against these particular vendors, at least in the UK.

According to Justice Richard Arnold’s ruling, “The ISPs have an essential role in these infringements, since it is via the ISPs’ services that the advertisements and offers for sale are communicated to 95 percent of broadband users in the UK.” –Fashionista

Before joining the Princeton faculty, Morrison held the Albert Schweitzer Chair in the Humanities at the State University of New York-Albany. Previously, she was a senior editor at Random House for 20 years. She also has taught at Howard University, Yale University, Bard College and Rutgers University. . . .

The papers of Toni Morrison contain about 180 linear feet of research materials documenting the author’s life, work and writing methods, according to Don Skemer, curator of manuscripts in the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections in the Princeton University Library. The papers will be among the most important holdings of the Manuscripts Division, housed in Firestone Library, with its renowned collection of major literary and publishing archives. –Princeton University

Monday New: S&S DRM-free imprint; Nobel Lit Prize awarded; British free speech case; and the possible future of print magazines

Monday New: S&S DRM-free imprint; Nobel Lit Prize awarded; British free...

“The science fiction and fantasy community were early adopters of electronic formats, and have enthusiastically embraced DRM-free content while showing great respect for authors’ works under copyright,” said Joe Monti, executive editor of Saga. –Publishers Weekly

Much of his work is concerned with the aftermath of the German occupation of France during World War II, and since Modiano was born right after the end of the War, his own sense of identity is entwined with the cultural and political impact of occupation on France.

In a rare interview accorded to France Today in 2011, Modiano says he never considered becoming anything but a writer. “I had no diploma, no definite goal to achieve. But it is tough for a young writer to begin so early. Really, I prefer not to read my early books. Not that I don’t like them, but I don’t recognize myself anymore, like an old actor watching himself as a young leading man.” –NPR

The artist, who is well known in his field, says his right to freedom of speech is particularly acute because he was a victim of such serious abuse, and because his book is intended to encourage other victims to come forward. . . .

However, his ex-wife’s lawyers dispute claims that the case could set a precedent undermining the rights of other authors, arguing that it is concerned only with the rights of one child, who has a number of health problems, who they say would suffer catastrophic psychological distress were he to read parts of his father’s work.

What is not in dispute is that the case hinges on an obscure piece of Victorian case law, known as Wilkinson v Downton, in which a man who played a practical joke on an east London pub landlady in 1897 was found to be guilty of the “intentional infliction of mental distress”. –The Guardian

The joy we get from throwing magazines away seems like a bad sign for their future. On the one hand, there is something nice about reading something you know is finite. Unlike the endless internet that you will never conquer, once you’ve read a magazine you’ve read it, and you get a nice feeling of accomplishment at least until the next issue arrives. On the other hand, it’s a reminder of what a curious position magazines hold — they are so much more disposable than books that you almost wonder why they should be in print form at all, and yet once they go online you tend to lose your incentive to read them, since there’s so much other stuff to read online. –Gigaom