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sexism

Tuesday News: Dangers of corporate copyright infringement, when gender and religion collide, 1930s Harlem map, and cute proposal story

Tuesday News: Dangers of corporate copyright infringement, when gender and religion...

While the stereotypical copyright story pits private users against large corporate rights-holders, real-world cases are often more complex. After all, most content creators are private, and many content users—as well as content infringers—are corporate. The corporate infringements are the most frustrating, as I live off photo licenses issued to corporations in the same sectors. . . .

For a concise idea of what could go wrong, let me indulge in a list of recent venues where commercial interests have used my work without permission, payment, or even a simple credit:

Billboards, YouTube commercials, pesticide spray labels, website banners, exterminator trucks, t-shirts, iPhone cases, stickers, company logos, eBook covers, trading cards, board games, video game graphics, children’s books, novel covers, app graphics, alt-med dietary supplement labels, press releases, pest control advertisements, crowdfunding promo videos, coupons, fliers, newspaper articles, postage stamps, advertisements for pet ants (yes, that’s a thing), canned food packaging, ant bait product labels, stock photography libraries, and greeting cards. –Ars Technica

The plane took off 20 minutes late because an ultra-Orthodox man was negotiating with passengers so as not to have to sit next to a woman—me—on the 11-hour flight. I asked myself if this was karma or poetic justice. After all, I had just spoken to hundreds of people about exactly these issues and the way women are made to feel like second-class citizens as a result. Part of me wanted to smile and hand out copies of my book. But I sat there silently for a long time, watching all this happen, witnessing all these men around me talking about me, mostly in Yiddish, but also in Hebrew and English, without looking directly at me. I sat there, torn between my desire not to make a scene and my feeling that If I don’t articulate, right here and now, how all this affects women, how this affects me, who will? –Tablet Magazine

But keep in mind that this map is not drawn to scale. I know it looks like the joints are jumping from the second you step off the curb, but in reality, you’ll need to hoof it 21 blocks from the top of Central Park to 131st street for things to start cookin’. Hopefully, this geographical liberty won’t get you too hot under the collar. And if it does, well, it may be Prohibition, but stress-relieving beverages await you in every location listed, as well as in some 500 speakeasies Campbell allowed to remain on the down low. –Open Culture

Fader wrote in her blog this weekend, “While the duration of time the ring sat there for is wholly unknown to us — time having been so distorted that afternoon — it was long enough for Mal to think, ‘Huh. That will be tricky to pick up.’ No sooner had this thought occurred, the ring slipped through the space and fell into oblivion.” –ABC News

Friday News: Critiquing Anita Sarkeesian’s Critics, the new waterproof Kobo reader, pregnancy app Glow, and new book on 3 top newswomen

Friday News: Critiquing Anita Sarkeesian’s Critics, the new waterproof Kobo reader,...

And, again, what Sarkeesian is doing is standard pop culture criticism, of the kind that films and books have been subjected to for decades – and TvsWVG is pretty good. It’s thorough and accessible, and it’s both a good introduction to the concept of feminist cultural criticism and an example of the increasing respect that games receive as an artform. The world was a very tedious place when all people asked was whether games were art at all; now that we know that they are, in their place come both external critiques (which includes TvsWVG) and intelligent responses from the industry itself (such as Jonathan Blow’s Braid, a platformer which deconstructs the “damsel in distress” trope). –New Statesman

Kobo launched the Aura HD last year as a premium, large screen ereader device focused on the hardcore reader, a “niche device” which Kobo thought was going to account for just 5% of its hardware sales.

What it found however was that the Aura HD made up about a quarter of all hardware sales in the last year. –Yahoo News UK and Tech Crunch

In over two decades of seeing reproductive health practitioners, not a single doctor had ever suggested that I track my cycle. When I had started to entertain the idea of getting pregnant, I asked one of my doctors for tips on what I should do, and she looked at me rather oddly and offered this sage advice: “Just have sex.”

But as I would come to find, it’s not actually that easy. The fertility window is already pretty narrow, and as you get older you’re honestly only looking at a day or two when you can actually get pregnant. When you’re 35, you don’t have time to be casual about it. I realized that I had spent far too much of my life clueless about the happenings in my pelvic region. I wanted all the information laid out cleanly for me. Very quickly, and with lovely graphics that didn’t offend my discerning taste, Glow managed to illustrate everything I didn’t know. –Gizmodo

A rep for Couric declined to comment on the allegation, but a source close to the global anchor for Yahoo News said this, “It’s sad that? the author and her PR team continue to alienate their target audience by relying on classic anti-feminist caricatures, tabloid-like misrepresentations and outright falsehoods about these three extraordinary women. Thankfully all three of them have survived and thrived after dealing with far worse than a couple of gossip items.” –The Hollywood Reporter