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Thursday News: The Author Edition

Thursday News: The Author Edition

hough the complaint is open to the public and details will likely be available in many places on the Internet, please remember that judgment now is in the court’s figurative hands. I make a plea for my supporters to refrain from bullying, name-calling, or attacking the defendant online. –Rachel Ann Nunes

I have also been apprised of an allegation that Blaze author Rhonda Nelson’s Double Dare has been plagiarized in a book by Amanda Reed called Abandoned for Love (check out the 1-star reviews).

From Aubrey Rose’s blog:

Well, somebody stole my book. A kind fan pointed out that Clarissa Black’s book City Girl, Mountain Bear was similar to my novella City Girl, Country Wolf. Too similar. This “author” has taken my storyline and rewritten my book scene for scene, changing just enough to be able to get through Amazon’s plagiarism filters. Not a single sentence is the same, but the story is exactly the same. –Aubrey Rose and Rhonda Nelson

Concerns about McLaw were raised after he sent a four-page letter to officials in Dorchester County. Those concerns brought together authorities from multiple jurisdictions, including health authorities.

McLaw’s letter was of primary concern to healthcare officials, Maciarello says. It, combined with complaints of alleged harassment and an alleged possible crime from various jurisdictions led to his suspension. Maciarello cautions that these allegations are still being investigated; authorities, he says, “proceeded with great restraint.” –The Digital Reader

I am a person. And I maintain my own FB page. And I will piss you off. This has nothing to do with my books. And here is the thing – I don’t care if you like me. I am trying to get through the day. Just like you are. –Chelsea Cain Facebook page

Thursday News: Diversity in publishing, Litrate wants to take on Goodreads, Teju Cole on James Baldwin, and 86-year-old debut Romance novelist

Thursday News: Diversity in publishing, Litrate wants to take on Goodreads,...

Educating others in the business is just part of the job for Davis, but it might not be so necessary if there were more people of color in the industry. She believes that a company like Simon & Schuster is trying, but she says it’s not easy to attract young people. Starting salaries are so low, few can afford to take a job in publishing. –NPR

LitRate is our dream for a new website for the literary community. It will essentially be our version of Goodreads—but better. We’ve seen all your ideas, all your complaints, and all your dreams of new features. We’re here and ready to implement them in a new site that we can build together! –Litrate

If Leukerbad was his mountain pulpit, the United States was his audience. The remote village gave him a sharper view of what things looked like back home. He was a stranger in Leukerbad, Baldwin wrote, but there was no possibility for blacks to be strangers in the United States, nor for whites to achieve the fantasy of an all-white America purged of blacks. This fantasy about the disposability of black life is a constant in American history. It takes a while to understand that this disposability continues. It takes whites a while to understand it; it takes non-black people of color a while to understand it; and it takes some blacks, whether they’ve always lived in the U.S. or are latecomers like myself, weaned elsewhere on other struggles, a while to understand it. American racism has many moving parts, and has had enough centuries in which to evolve an impressive camouflage. It can hoard its malice in great stillness for a long time, all the while pretending to look the other way. Like misogyny, it is atmospheric. You don’t see it at first. But understanding comes. –The New Yorker

While she’s proud of the buzz her steamy story has generated, she never dreamed of being a writer and had only taken one creative writing class when she was younger. Gorringe, a fan of “Fifty Shades of Grey,” has no plans for a second novel. For now, she’s just enjoying the spotlight. –ABC/Yahoo