Monday News: Blogging and free speech; pink is an illusion; historical romance in print; the ethics of using another author’s platform; and more on net neutrality

Monday News: Blogging and free speech; pink is an illusion; historical...

“The Ninth Circuit properly reversed, finding that the First Amendment protects bloggers no less than the institutional press and that Cox was writing about issues of legitimate public concern.  On retrial, the plaintiffs will have to establish that Cox was negligent in publishing the statements at issue — and that’s all well and good.  I want to spend a little time, though, thinking about the tail end of the decision, in which the Ninth Circuit discusses a specific group of Cox’s statements that both the Ninth Circuit and the district court held to be non-actionable opinion.” Digital Media Law Project

“So I see a lot of blame going on for how this author lost print distribution, but nobody’s mentioned the fact that historical romance shelf-space, in general, is falling precipitously. There are other amazing authors who are having the exact same thing happen to them as we speak.” Courtney Milan’s Blog

“I’m bothered that C.S./Susanne saw an OLD blog post by me that said I sold as well as I did without promotion, which was true at the time. It’s NO LONGER true. I promote now. Nor did she Tweet as infrequently as she claimed. Go look at her Tweets. She did promote the book. What she did was capitalize on MY platform without giving me credit so she can set herself up as a guru and make money on a how-to book. “ Barbara Rogan – In Cold Ink

“As a number of observers have explained — including Jeff in his Gigaom piece — the court’s decision wasn’t based on a belief that net neutrality itself is a bad thing, but a view that the FCC implemented its rules in a legally questionable way. If it wanted to prevent ISPs from giving preferential treatment to certain content providers, the communications regulator could have defined internet service providers as “common carriers,” as it did with telecom companies — but the FCC didn’t do that. “ Gigaom