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plagiarism

Thursday News: The Author Edition

Thursday News: The Author Edition

hough the complaint is open to the public and details will likely be available in many places on the Internet, please remember that judgment now is in the court’s figurative hands. I make a plea for my supporters to refrain from bullying, name-calling, or attacking the defendant online. –Rachel Ann Nunes

I have also been apprised of an allegation that Blaze author Rhonda Nelson’s Double Dare has been plagiarized in a book by Amanda Reed called Abandoned for Love (check out the 1-star reviews).

From Aubrey Rose’s blog:

Well, somebody stole my book. A kind fan pointed out that Clarissa Black’s book City Girl, Mountain Bear was similar to my novella City Girl, Country Wolf. Too similar. This “author” has taken my storyline and rewritten my book scene for scene, changing just enough to be able to get through Amazon’s plagiarism filters. Not a single sentence is the same, but the story is exactly the same. –Aubrey Rose and Rhonda Nelson

Concerns about McLaw were raised after he sent a four-page letter to officials in Dorchester County. Those concerns brought together authorities from multiple jurisdictions, including health authorities.

McLaw’s letter was of primary concern to healthcare officials, Maciarello says. It, combined with complaints of alleged harassment and an alleged possible crime from various jurisdictions led to his suspension. Maciarello cautions that these allegations are still being investigated; authorities, he says, “proceeded with great restraint.” –The Digital Reader

I am a person. And I maintain my own FB page. And I will piss you off. This has nothing to do with my books. And here is the thing – I don’t care if you like me. I am trying to get through the day. Just like you are. –Chelsea Cain Facebook page

Monday News: Hachette V. Amazon plus a dash of plagiarism

Monday News: Hachette V. Amazon plus a dash of plagiarism

So how is Amazon making the ebook business not worth pursuing? They are doing it by discounting so aggressively that the value of the book business for ebook retailers is so miniscule that it doesn’t even raise the eyebrows of the major tech companies. While the book business is big, why even bother with it if the profit margins are so small as to not even move the needle? Your time is better spent focusing on video games with in-app purchases, among many other things. –Jake Kerr via Medium

But Orwell then went on to undermine Amazon’s argument much more effectively than Hachette ever has. “It is of course a great mistake to imagine that cheap books are good for the book trade,” he wrote. “Actually it is just the other way about … The cheaper books become, the less money is spent on books.”

Instead of buying two expensive books, he says, the consumer will buy two cheap books and then use the rest of his money to go to the movies. “This is an advantage from the reader’s point of view and doesn’t hurt trade as a whole, but for the publisher, the compositor, the author and the bookseller, it is a disaster,” Orwell wrote. –New York Times

Pietsch insists that Hachette is “negotiating in good faith”, a point that Amazon has disputed in the past (in the leaked letter), and then he goes on to make the bogus historical claim that paperbacks were originally “not intended to replace hardbacks but to create a new format available later, at a lower price”. That’s not at all true, but to be fair Amazon also played fast and loose with the early history of the paperback book. –The Digital Reader

I will start by saying that nothing we do or say is 100% original. Even some exact combination of some of the words I write here have probably been written somewhere, by someone, in the vastness of history and time. –Shey Stahl