Monday News: Seattle booksellers, RIP Amiri Baraka, Kamloops newspaper shuts down, Elsevier redux, and an American writer in Japan

Monday News: Seattle booksellers, RIP Amiri Baraka, Kamloops newspaper shuts down,...

“‘I don’t do anything differently because of Amazon’s presence,’ says Lara Hamilton, owner of Book Larder and of the Kim Ricketts Book Events speakers series, which brings authors to places like Microsoft. ‘Amazon’s reach is global, so the only thing that likely differentiates my experience from that of booksellers in other places is that I have plenty of Amazon employees as customers. I want Book Larder to provide a great experience, whether the customer is shopping for the perfect cookbook, taking a cooking class, or attending an author talk. Experienced humans are still better at the delivery of all of those things.’” Publishers Weekly

“But I think in that circle, those people generally were fighting against the academic life — academic poetry of the ’50s. Whether you’re talking about Ginsberg and the Beats or you’re talking … the Black Mountain school [of poetry] or you’re talking about Frank O’Hara and the New York school … they were all aligned, I think, in a kind of united front against the dullness of the new critics and the dullness of the kind of poetry [those critics were] trying to bring back.” NPR

“The end of the newspaper after about 80 years, and the fact that the bustling community of about 83,000 people will be without a daily paper, dramatically highlights the challenges facing the newspaper industry as past models for financial success are challenged by shifts in advertising, declining circulation and the Internet.” The Globe and Mail

“Many advocates of open access make a moral case for it, too, arguing that freely available research is a public good—and that much of it is paid for by taxpayers in the first place. Ross Mounce, a palaeontologist at the University of Bath, in England, and an advocate of open access, is enthusiastic about what has happened. “This”, he says, referring to the row, “has been great [for open-access advocates]. Lots of people who were completely apathetic before are starting to realise the importance of how we distribute scientific research.”” The Economist

“In a daze, I was paraded before the press, blinded by flashbulbs and tracked by TV cameras. But because I couldn’t understand the directions, I often talked to the wrong camera, stared into space or even leaned on the scenery — until my intrepid and glamorous young translator told the reporters to wave if they wanted David-san to look at their cameras, like a baby at a birthday party. I watched the film with her whispering in my ear: ‘He is the detective.’ It was as if I had fallen asleep and had a weird dream about my own book. At the end, when the lights came up and I stood to leave, she tapped my shoulder and pointed. The audience was clapping wildly. For me. I took a few deep bows and fled.” New York Times