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novella

REVIEW:  The Bad Boy of Bluebonnet by Jessica Clare

REVIEW: The Bad Boy of Bluebonnet by Jessica Clare

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Dear Ms. Clare,

I bought this self-published novella for 99c. It’s book 4.5 in the Bluebonnet series but can be easily read as a stand-alone.

Emily Allard-Smith runs The Peppermint House, the only bed and breakfast in Bluebonnet. It doesn’t get many patrons but fortunately, she has enough money that it’s not a big deal for her. She loves to bake and generously shares her cakes, muffins and biscuits cookies with the local police and pretty much anyone else who wants them. She dreams of opening a bakery. I reckon she should. There aren’t enough bakeries in the world. This is my firm belief.

Her ex-husband Braden and she bought the old Victorian house as a fixer-upper when they were still married. But shortly after they moved in, Braden was offered his own reality tv show, ghost-hunting around the country. He took off and they divorced. She got the house in the settlement. Braden was always into ghosts and one of the things he always told Emily was that the house was haunted. She is lonely and this is only magnified when there are no guests staying at The Peppermint House. She regularly hears thumps and scrapes coming from the attic in the middle of the night and her lights flicker. She’s terrified Braden was right and there are actually ghosts. She’s worn out her welcome with the local police who generously attended her house a few times in the middle of the night to check (although, I must say they did a pretty ordinary job of it) and Braden is too far away and wouldn’t come anyway. In the middle of the night when she feels she can’t call on anyone for help, her loneliness is the worst.

Jericho Lozada has recently come to town and is staying with friends while he works out if there is enough business in Bluebonnet to sustain a handyman/plumber and while he decides if he likes it enough to stay. He looks like a bad boy – with tattoos and piercings, a mohawk and a Harley. Emily, on the surface at least, looks like his exact opposite. She’s buttoned up in old fashioned cardigans. Nevertheless, an attraction sparks when Jericho does some handiwork of the carpentry variety at The Peppermint House and she bakes him cookies. When she calls him in the middle of the night to check the attic he comes right on over and… let’s just say he solves a number of her problems. Ahem.

It’s sexy and fun and cute and a pleasant evening’s entertaining read without being anything particularly earth-shattering. It delivered exactly what it promised and that’s nothing to complain about.

The sex is pretty hot and enthusiastic which is always fun to read.  Yay for enthusiastic sex.

The copy is mostly clean but there was a continuity error in that when Jericho comes over in the middle of the night he’s still wearing his Scooby-Doo sleep pants (adorbs!) but in the morning they’ve suddenly turned into jeans.

There is little conflict between Emily and Jericho once they start talking to one another and it works as a novella quite well. Braden is no serious threat to their happiness and that situation resolves quickly. I liked it and it’s certainly worth the 99c pricetag.  I give The Bad Boy of Bluebonnet a B.

regards,
Kaetrin

 

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REVIEW:  Surviving America’s Sweetheart by Lori Green

REVIEW: Surviving America’s Sweetheart by Lori Green

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What would happen if the Bachelorette found herself in the Hunger Games?

Riley Davenport has it all. She’s America’s Sweetheart, the lucky woman seeking her true love from a pool of twenty-five handsome bachelors. All she has to do is survive.
The odds are stacked against her. With Lucifer and God trying to one-up each other using reality television as their new battleground, Riley must fight murderous demons, boring angels and jaded TV hosts for her happily ever after.

As long as the hot tub isn’t filled with molten lava, she might have a fighting chance. If she doesn’t lose her life, she might lose her heart.

Dear Ms Green,

I saw this listed in our submissions section and something called out to me, “read this this one.” Maybe it’s the “mish-mash” plot. Perhaps it was the excerpt. But anyway, I pushed back the book I had been planning to read that day and queued this one up on the ereader.

What a cute premise! It’s different, it’s timely, it’s a crazy mix of reality/dating TV shows with a paranormal romance that winds up sending them both up. I don’t read too many paranormals and have never watched any reality TV so perhaps that’s why it all seemed so fresh to me but I had a blast reading it.

Since we the readers and Riley can’t know much about each bachelor – after all it would ruin the ratings if everyone knew who was going to start the demon fighting – having it be a first person point of view narrative makes sense. And since even the show host much less Riley doesn’t know demon from angel from mere mortal – though everyone has their suspicions – it certainly adds spice to Riley’s picks and dates.

Riley is a woman unabashedly out to find the love of her life. As such, she’s as prone to weak knees from a soul melting kiss as the next woman. But she’s also done her research on the show – demon fights generally occur on the second day during the group date – and her prep work with fight trainers, exercise coaches and fitness gurus. She’s as ready to fight off the hell spawn as she can be while keeping an open mind as to who gets a rose at the end of the night. I do love the way she tries to ensure that her two final picks are men she might actually have a future with rather than just ones who trip her trigger and send her pulses racing. Her ultimate choice is based in mutual compatibility and a hilarious final date.

“Surviving America’s Sweetheart” is fast, fun and funny though the humor is more silly than actually black, IMO. I did notice a continuity name issue and a few of the sentences needed to be read a few times for the meaning to be plain but I’m glad to gave this one a try. B

~Jayne

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