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literary prizes

Thursday News: Barbara Freethy partners with Ingram; Richard Flanagan takes the Man Booker Prize; Anthony Horowitz ARC surprise; and Jules Verne amusement park.

Thursday News: Barbara Freethy partners with Ingram; Richard Flanagan takes the...

I think this venture is going to be a win-win-win for booksellers, readers and Indie authors like myself who have not been able to reach the print market outside of print-on-demand in the last few years. There’s been a void in the market, and the larger publishers have been unwilling to put bestselling digital titles by Indie authors into print without taking a piece of the digital pie. But with my partnership with Ingram, I’ll still maintain all of my digital rights. I’m very excited to have Ingram as a partner in this exciting new venture. And I’m so happy that readers will be able to get my books in any format they like from print to digital to audio! –barbarafreethy.com

“In Australia the Man Booker prize is sometimes seen as something of a chicken raffle,” he joked. “I just didn’t expect to end up the chicken.”

The novel is an incredibly personal book for Flanagan, whose father was a survivor of Japan’s campaign to build the railway. He died aged 98 on the day Flanagan emailed his final draft to his publisher.

“I grew up, as did my five siblings, as children of the Death Railway,” Flanagan said. “We carried many incommunicable things and I realised at a certain point … that I would have to write this book.” –The Guardian

Ms. Andreadis said that fewer than 2,000 copies had been sent out, and that Harper planned to reprint a new batch without the errors.

It is no big deal: Mr. Horowitz did not use unsavory language, abuse the copy editors, or expose some fantastic dispute between himself and his publishers. At most, there is firm authorial pushback. He just wants things the way he wants them. And he comes straight to the point: “I’M NOT CHANGING THIS.” –New York Times

In 2007, Nantes opened the combined art installation and amusement park on the site of a former shipyard. Les Machines offers both carnival-style rides for which anyone can purchase a ticket, and smaller machines demonstrated by visitors selected from the crowd. The result is a kind of steampunk amusement park, and a breathtaking juxtaposition of old, new – and weird. –BBC Travel

Wednesday News: Apple announces new products, Barnes & Noble loses less money this quarter, Man Booker Prize is now multinational,  and victim blaming Janay Rice

Wednesday News: Apple announces new products, Barnes & Noble loses less...

F is for Fanboy/Fangirl. You know who you are. You buy a new Apple device every single year. You line up outside Apple Stores waiting for it to appear. You pick fights with Phandroids (aka Google Android fans) about what phone had which feature first. You are in hog heaven right about now.

… and also for Fitness. A new app designed to give you a comprehensive view of your daily activity, via the watch’s motion-tracking sensors.

… and also for Four Point Seven and Five Point Five. Those are the screen sizes of the two new iPhones, the iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus. They’re substantially larger than the iPhone 5s but are more in line with the size of competing Android phones. –Yahoo Tech

Analysts are projecting a loss of 22 cents per share for the fiscal year. After being $1.33 billion a year ago, analysts project revenue to drop 5% year-over-year to $1.26 billion for the quarter. For the year, revenue is projected to roll in at $6.10 billion –Forbes

In other award news, though:

Louise Erdrich has been named winner of the 2014 PEN/Saul Bellow Award for Achievement in American Fiction.

. . .

Ursula K. Le Guin has been named winner of the National Book Foundation’s 2014 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. She will receive this honor at the 65th National Book Awards ceremony in New York on Nov. 19. –Washington Post

The Root has a piece detailing some of the “worst responses” to the video if you want to witness the awfulness.

And if you haven’t seen the video yet, be warned: it’s incredibly disturbing.

That we feel entitled (and excited) to access gut-wrenching images of a woman being abused – to be entranced by the looks of domestic violence – speaks volumes not only about the man who battered her, but also about we who gaze in parasitic rapture. We click and consume, comment and carry on. What are we saying about ourselves when we place (black) women’s pain under a microscope only to better consume the full kaleidoscope of their suffering?
. . .
Black women are often systematically excluded from both the category of “woman” and that of “victim”. Our pain, these days as ever, can never be pure enough. –The Guardian