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Thursday News: Update on EC v. DA, Atavist Books shutting down, Interview with After author Anna Todd, and mummifying Barbie

Thursday News: Update on EC v. DA, Atavist Books shutting down,...

Jane would also like everyone to know that she is doing fine and greatly appreciates all the well wishes.

I’d like to add another thank you to everyone who donated to the defense fund, which is currently more than $54,000. Given the awfulness of the past few days, this shared accomplishment has helped keep my faith in the integrity of our overlapping book communities. –Dear Author

“While we are very proud of the quality of the titles produced by Atavist Books to date, we have identified that the market for highly innovative enhanced full length literary e-books still heavily relies on a print component and has yet to emerge,” said a spokesperson for IAC, who confirmed the news, first reported yesterday. –Publishers Weekly

What this says to me is that we should not underestimate the market clout of readers in their late teens and early 20s.

On Wattpad, “After” has been read more than one billion times. The multi-part book has just under 10 million unique readers, who have left 6 million comments. It’s crazy. To make bestseller lists, authors generally sell tens of thousands of books per week. Then again, reading on Wattpad is free.

Todd’s method is madness, too. Just out of college, she wrote the million-word series in largely unedited spurts from her Android phone, over the course of a little more than a year. She told Re/code she started writing because she was an avid fanfic reader and was bored without new installments from Wattpad writers she followed. So she pulled out her phone and jotted down her own, typos and all.

Todd finalized the book contract in June of this year, just before wrapping up the epic story. For the print version, the character named after the real-life pop star “Harry Styles” — an abusive jerk with a heart of gold (well, maybe) — has been renamed Hardin. –Re/code

Monday News: Update on EC v DA, NY Comic Con’s anti-harassment policy, Sheila Weller on The News Sorority, and a 20-pound Death Star Gown

Monday News: Update on EC v DA, NY Comic Con’s anti-harassment...

But in a culture cluttered with people who are famous for no good reason whatsoever, Marc Randazza is an outlier: someone who is becoming famous as a First Amendment badass whose First Amendment badassery actually exceeds his rep.  If I ever get sued for defamation, he’s my first call.– Popehat 

Fensterman says that ReedPop collaborated with The Mary Sue, the widely respected feminist geek culture website, on the language of the policy. He says it’s now comprehensive, describing various types of harassment (e.g., “unwelcome physical attention”) and bolding the statement that “cosplay is not consent.” Fensterman also notes that NYCC’s mobile apps will have a built-in button for reporting incidents of harassment. (The button won’t go live until the week of NYCC to prevent misuse.) “If someone is feeling unsafe or harassed, they should report it to anybody in a security shirt,” he says.

“We’re trying to give people multiple options with which they can help us create a safe environment for everybody.” –Publishers Weekly

“It’s easy to say that that’s the kind of stuff that gets picked up,” she said, “but there are a lot of things in the book about men acting pretty competitively.” (Like: Dan Rather’s canceling family vacations at the last minute to block Ms. Sawyer from subbing for him on the nightly news; Ted Koppel and Peter Jennings’s being sworn frenemies; Bob Schieffer’s trashing Mr. Rather during the scandal that cost Mr. Rather his job; and one boss who tried to block Ms. Couric being described by his own boss — a man — as “a bad hire, a drunk.”)

Ms. Weller, a longtime freelance writer and the author of “Girls Like Us,” a well-received book on three successful women in music (Carole King, Joni Mitchell and Carly Simon), intended this book to show how the newswomen used ambition, intelligence, an iron work ethic and, yes, looks and charm to break through walls in the male-dominated world of broadcast news. –New York Times