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Monday News: Update on EC v DA, NY Comic Con’s anti-harassment policy, Sheila Weller on The News Sorority, and a 20-pound Death Star Gown

Monday News: Update on EC v DA, NY Comic Con’s anti-harassment...

But in a culture cluttered with people who are famous for no good reason whatsoever, Marc Randazza is an outlier: someone who is becoming famous as a First Amendment badass whose First Amendment badassery actually exceeds his rep.  If I ever get sued for defamation, he’s my first call.– Popehat 

Fensterman says that ReedPop collaborated with The Mary Sue, the widely respected feminist geek culture website, on the language of the policy. He says it’s now comprehensive, describing various types of harassment (e.g., “unwelcome physical attention”) and bolding the statement that “cosplay is not consent.” Fensterman also notes that NYCC’s mobile apps will have a built-in button for reporting incidents of harassment. (The button won’t go live until the week of NYCC to prevent misuse.) “If someone is feeling unsafe or harassed, they should report it to anybody in a security shirt,” he says.

“We’re trying to give people multiple options with which they can help us create a safe environment for everybody.” –Publishers Weekly

“It’s easy to say that that’s the kind of stuff that gets picked up,” she said, “but there are a lot of things in the book about men acting pretty competitively.” (Like: Dan Rather’s canceling family vacations at the last minute to block Ms. Sawyer from subbing for him on the nightly news; Ted Koppel and Peter Jennings’s being sworn frenemies; Bob Schieffer’s trashing Mr. Rather during the scandal that cost Mr. Rather his job; and one boss who tried to block Ms. Couric being described by his own boss — a man — as “a bad hire, a drunk.”)

Ms. Weller, a longtime freelance writer and the author of “Girls Like Us,” a well-received book on three successful women in music (Carole King, Joni Mitchell and Carly Simon), intended this book to show how the newswomen used ambition, intelligence, an iron work ethic and, yes, looks and charm to break through walls in the male-dominated world of broadcast news. –New York Times

Tuesday News: BISG focuses on collaboration, Alibaba’s massive IPO, the New York Times flubs race again, and the years top banned books

Tuesday News: BISG focuses on collaboration, Alibaba’s massive IPO, the New...

Echoing Michael’s video message the panel also urged more industry collaboration. Indeed the growing emphasis on collaboration between separate players in the supply chain and the emphasis on publisher/customer outreach can produce friction in an industry used to clear demarcations between manufacturer, retailer and consumer. But Catogge said publishers and retailers have to reassess the notion of “owning the customer,” and Toolian called earlier models of channel ownership, “outdated notions of customer relations. We need to share our understanding of customers though not necessarily their email addresses.” –Publishers Weekly

Alibaba is a holding company. It owns Taobao.com, China’s version of eBay, and Tmall.com, another popular shopping destination where major international brands like Nike and Samsung have online stores. It also owns a business-to-business commerce site, and it developed a fast-growing cashless-payments system, Alipay, which is a Chinese version of Pay-pal. (As Vauhini Vara notes, the company has also been compared to Walmart.) In short, Alibaba has done a better job than its Chinese competitors in mimicking the American pacesetters that first demonstrated the power of these network effects. –New Yorker

There are some big questions here – about diversity, about editing procedures and about how The Times deals with stories about women and race. They are worth exploring in depth. . . .

“This is a signal to me that we have to constantly remind ourselves as editors of our blind spots, what we don’t know, and of how readers may react.”  –New York Times