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Monday News: Changes at Penguin Random House, Google settles with photographers, Rumored changes at Twitter, and Scribd’s infographic on reading

Monday News: Changes at Penguin Random House, Google settles with photographers,...

In explaining his reasoning for creating the Penguin Publishing Group, Dohle wrote that, as the book market continues to evolve and e-book sales grow, “it is clear that capitalizing on our authors’ opportunities for growth will require even greater collaboration and coordination, and even more unified publishing strategies across all formats.” He stressed, however, that while McIntosh’s appointment was a significant change for Penguin, “there is no change being contemplated for the creative and entrepreneurial direction of Penguin’s individual publishing imprints.” –Publishers Weekly

On a tangentially related note: I have seen more than one author utilize a celebrity photo, trademarked image, or clearly copyrighted image without any indication of licensing or permission. With all of the online complaining about piracy, people may forget that images are legally protected, too, and it is extremely problematic for authors to ask readers to respect copyrighted books when they do not show the same respect for copyrighted or trademarked images.

Google shared the news today on its blog, cautioning that this settlement is separate from its larger legal battle with the Authors Guild. This lawsuit, “American Society of Media Photographers, Inc. et al. v. Google Inc,” was first filed in 2010. Google’s Authors Guild legal struggles, however, first began in 2005 and continue to rage on. –Venture Beat

Twitter has already been trying to improve its users’ browsing experience,adding tweets favorited by friends to the timelines of users who try to refresh their feeds when no new tweets are available. Twitter CEO Dick Costolo explained that Twitter was trying to give users valuable content when it saw that they were refreshing their feeds and not getting new tweets multiple times. –Washington Post

Tuesday News: Tarantino sues Gawker, James Baldwin and Audre Lorde converse, digital publishing is growing in India, successful books are vivisected, and more questions emerge about new Adobe DRM strategy

Tuesday News: Tarantino sues Gawker, James Baldwin and Audre Lorde converse,...

“Tarantino’s lawyers filed a lawsuit that said: ‘Gawker Media has made a business of predatory journalism, violating people’s rights to make a buck. This time they went too far. Rather than merely publishing a news story reporting that Plaintiff’s screenplay may have been circulating in Hollywood without his permission, Gawker Media crossed the journalistic line by promoting itself to the public as the first source to read the entire Screenplay illegally.’” Los Angeles Times

“If we can put people on the moon and we can blow this whole planet up, if we can consider digging 18 inches of radioactive dirt off of the Bikini atolls and somehow finding something to do with it – if we can do that, we as Black cultural workers can somehow begin to turn that stuff around – because there’s nobody anymore buying ‘cave politics’ – ‘Kill the mammoth or else the species is extinct.’ We have moved beyond that. Those little scrubby-ass kids in the sixth grade – I want those Black kids to know that brute force is not a legitimate way of dealing across sex difference. I want to set up some different paradigms.” MoCADA Museum

“‘We have therefore started reaching out to bloggers with a significant audience. They are definitely more unbiased and objective in their feedback,’ Karthika said as she stressed the growing reach of social networking in particular and the World Wide Web in general in today’s context. ‘It is intriguing to see the rising demand for e-books. For instance, our own survey shows that an e-book that made Rs 25,000 a few months ago is now generating revenue of about Rs 1.25 lakh,’ she noted.” Times Of India

“Perhaps Adobe should have adopted a more long term and integrated approach by embedding both encrypted and later watermarked solutions within InDesign and collected the money in the upstream development. They could have still offered the downstream licence operation but would have probably achieved greater control of the market. Files could have been automatically exported in multiple formats all offering the publisher multiple channels and retailers an incentive to do what they do best – price and sell. Also it should be noted that as Adobe move towards the subscription based licencing of all their tools, this simpler approach could have been bundled in as a value added incentive to publishers.” Brave New World