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Harry-Potter

Wednesday News: NYPL hosts Amazon roundtable, Guernica names first paid publisher, JK Rowling’s plot map, and Game of Thrones wedding costs

Wednesday News: NYPL hosts Amazon roundtable, Guernica names first paid publisher,...

Amazon: Business As Usual? – Although I have not had a chance to watch it, and therefore cannot comment on the content, I’m thinking that the 759 comments (as of Tuesday night PST), some of which are pretty entertaining, suggest that it might be worth sitting through the 90-minute discussion of everyone’s favorite subject (not). From the website describing the event:

Authors, agents, and publishers take to the LIVE from the NYPL stage to tackle these urgent questions in a conversation moderated by Tina Bennett, literary agent at WME. Guests include: best-selling author James Patterson; Morgan Entrekin, publisher and president of Grove Atlantic; Bob Kohn, attorney and founder of EMusic.com; Tim Wu, law professor and theorist of “net neutrality;” Danielle Allen, political theorist, author of a new book on the Declaration of Independence and elected chair of the Pulitzer Prize Board; and David Vandagriff, intellectual property lawyer. –New York Public Library

Guernica Magazine Names Lisa Lucas PublisherGuernica Magazine is celebrating its 10th anniversary as an entirely free, volunteer-run publication that, as its latest edition demonstrates, is better than many professionally run publications. Lisa Lucas, who has been serving as volunteer publisher, is poised to be the magazine’s first paid employee, and she is expected to undertake fundraising to pay more contributors and even produce a print version of the magazine. It will be interesting to see how, if at all, funding changes Guernica‘s priorities, content, and/or reach.

“I am thrilled to be charged with ushering Guernica into a new era of growth and sustainability. For 10 years, the magazine has been publishing the highest caliber of intellectual and literary work for free,” Ms. Lucas said in an announcement. “With keen long-term strategy, we will continue to do so while fostering creative culture by supporting our incredible contributors and expanding our offerings to new platforms.” –New York Observer

How J.K. Rowling Plotted Harry Potter with a Hand-Drawn Spreadsheet – First, if you don’t already visit Open Culture on a regular basis, start today – the site is devoted to locating free content, whether it be music, film, books, or cartoons. This is a particularly interesting entry, as it contains a piece of notebook paper on which JK Rowling plotted chapters 13-24 of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. If you find writerly processes interesting, check out Rowling’s intricate chart.

At the height of the Harry Potter novels’ popularity, I asked a number of people why those books in particular enjoyed such a devoted readership. Everyone gave almost the same answer: that author J.K. Rowling “tells a good story.” The response at once clarified everything and nothing; of course a “good story” can draw a large, enthusiastic (and, at that time, impatient) readership, but what does it take to actually tell a good story? –Open Culture

The true cost of every wedding on ‘Game of Thrones’ – Want to recreate one of the Game of Thrones‘ weddings? According to wedding planner Sarah Haywood, all it takes is money. How much, you may ask? Somewhere between $500 and $10 million ought to do it, depending on your wedding of choice.

What if you were truly determined to host one of Game of Thrones’ infamous weddings in real life, and had the resources to do it? What challenges would you face, and just how much would it set you back?

Even with our copious infographic experience, we couldn’t calculate this one alone. So we roped in the help of Sarah Haywood, described by Time as “Britain’s most sought-after wedding planner and an authority on multimillion-dollar weddings.” Haywood has dozens of high-end nuptials under her belt, and she agreed to lend us her professional perspective. –Daily Dot

Monday News: Apple behaves badly (again), Avon tries out a new type of story, Rowling regrets Hermione coupling, and movie-talk as marriage counseling

Monday News: Apple behaves badly (again), Avon tries out a new...

“The secret wage-theft agreements between Apple, Google, Intel, Adobe, Intuit, and Pixar now owned by Disney are described in court papers obtained by PandoDaily as “an overarching conspiracy” in violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act and the Clayton Antitrust Act, and at times it reads like something lifted straight out of the robber baron era that produced those laws. Today’s inequality crisis is America’s worst on record since statistics were first recorded a hundred years ago — the only comparison would be to the era of the railroad tycoons in the late 19th century.” PandoDaily

“‘I wrote the Hermione/Ron relationship as a form of wish fulfillment,’ she says. ‘That’s how it was conceived, really. For reasons that have very little to do with literature and far more to do with me clinging to the plot as I first imagined it, Hermione ended up with Ron.’” Hypable

“Study participants were sent home with a list of 47 movies with intimate relationships as a major plot focus and asked to watch one a week for the next month, followed by the same guided discussion for about 45 minutes.

Which approach proved most effective? To the surprise of the researchers, all worked equally well. All three methods halved the divorce-and-separation rate to 11 percent compared to the 24 percent rate among the couples in the control group. Partners in the control group received no training or instructions but were otherwise similar in age, education, ethnicity, relationship satisfaction, and other dimensions.

Discussing relationship movies, it turns outs, was just as effective as more intensive skills-building programs. The results suggest that many couples already possess relationship skills, they just need reminders to put these into practice, the authors conclude. “And that’s an amazingly fertile idea. It’s more sensible and it’s cheaper,” said Bradbury.” EurekAlert