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Harlequin

Monday News: Harlequin to publish Laverne Cox’s memoir; HarperCollins’s adventure with big data; Amazon starts Christian imprint; Judges needed for Readers Choice Award; and great costumes from Game of Thrones

Monday News: Harlequin to publish Laverne Cox’s memoir; HarperCollins’s adventure with...

Important Notice: There are reports that upgrading to the new Adobe Digital Editions will remove access to old purchases due to the new DRM scheme. Do not upgrade at this time. Refusing an upgrade will simply keep you at the status quo.

“Cox said in a statement, ‘By sharing my full, unvarnished story, including details of my life and family history I have never before revealed, I hope to provide a voice and safe place for those who have suffered because of their race, class, gender, abuse, violence and trauma.’” BET

“Digital changes our ability to acquire more data, which is good and bad. The good side is it gives us the opportunity to look at things that we do and also what we acquire in a different way. The bad thing is that the risk is you have too much noise and you need to make sure you’re identifying exactly what you’re looking for rather than being swamped by data.” Fast Company

“Amazon Publishing announced the launch of a Christian imprint that will specialize in faith-based nonfiction and fiction. Titles from the new imprint, Waterfall Press, will be published by Brilliance Publishing, a division of Amazon. The first title from the press, The Four Best Places to Live by Mark Buchanan, will release next month.” Publishers Weekly

“Entries will be judged in two rounds: first round and final round. Judges will receive and may read the complete book, but for contest purposes, we ask that you fill out the score sheet after reading the first thirty pages and before finishing the book. Judges will receive books in PDF format. Please make sure you can accept and read PDFs on your devices.” North Texas RWA

Monday News: B&N is being investigated by the SEC, marketing v. publishing, the digital publishing market, intellectual property jobs, and the growth of Harlequin India

Monday News: B&N is being investigated by the SEC, marketing v....

(1) the Company’s restatement of earnings announced on July 29, 2013, and (2) a separate matter related to a former non-executive employee’s allegation that the Company improperly allocated certain Information Technology expenses between its NOOK and Retail segments for purposes of segment reporting.

Barnes & Noble reports that it is cooperating with the SEC’s investigation; however, BN stock fell almost 8% after the bookseller’s quarterly report detailing the investigation was released. Forbes

“The lines between editorial and marketing content are already blurred, as marketers work to answer questions and solve problems for both current and prospective customers. If publishing incumbents can’t establish a customer-facing legitimacy, marketers may become their new and even primary distribution channel.” Magellan Media

“To say that there’s no market today for digital products like cookbooks, textbooks, and the like would be like saying in 1978 that there was no market for PCs in the home or school simply because there were only a handful of truly successful models, none of which came from one of the major computer manufacturers (Wikipedia).” The Digital Reader

“The report found that these industries included about 5.4 million jobs for US workers or about 5 percent of all private sector jobs. These jobs paid on average 33 percent more than other jobs, according to the study.” Galley Cat

“‘These are often professionally successful women who represent the new India. Even though a large part of our readership still comes from older women in the 35-40 years age bracket, we are wooing a younger demographic such as college girls and young professional women who are probably single and at a marriageable age,’ adds Chowdhury.

That the stereotypes about the Mills & Boon men being chauvinistic and dominating are changing also helps in wider acceptability. “The Indian titles, which now sell far more than the global ones in this market, offer a great degree of cultural and gender sensitivity. The women characters are not just secretaries or school teachers like those of yesteryears, they are doctors, bankers and engineers; and the men even if they are rich and handsome are also sensitive and make adjustments. The themes of second marriage and arranged marriage have also been explored in recent Indian M&B titles,” explains Chowdhury.” Economic Times