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Harlequin Historical

REVIEW:  Never Forget Me by Marguerite Kaye

REVIEW: Never Forget Me by Marguerite Kaye

never-forget-me

AS WAR BLAZES ACROSS EUROPE, THREE COUPLES FIND A LOVE THAT IS POWERFUL ENOUGH TO OVERCOME ALL THE ODDS…

A KISS GOODBYE, 1914

As war looms, genteel Flora yearns to be more than just an observer. She finds a revolutionary kindred spirit in soldier Geraint—but will their fragile love be crushed before it can start to bloom?

DEAREST SYLVIE, 1916

Soldier Robbie cannot forget his one hedonistic night in Paris with beautiful waitress Sylvie. But as Europe burns, can these two star-crossed lovers ever be reunited?

FOREVER WITH ME, 1918

Nurse Sheila is horrified to discover her new boss is the French surgeon she woke beside after Armistice Day! Fighting for their love will be the bravest thing she’s ever had to do….

Dear Ms. Kaye,

After enjoying the two short time sequels that preceded the release of “Never Forget Me,” I knew I needed to check it out. I totally agree about how things changed after the war ended. But even if life changes were often for the better, I think some old world charm and courtly manners got left behind after 1918. Be that as it may, I was still looking forward to watching the beginning, middle and end of the war and how the characters would grow and develop with it.

I loved that Flora and Geraint quickly progress beyond their initial “hackles raised” meeting. They’re both blunt and honest, each says what they think and move past silly misunderstandings that would have lingered long past my tolerance point in a full length novel. This isn’t to say I didn’t enjoyed watching them intially butt heads and spar a little.

They very similar outlook on and problems in life even if they’re from “opposite sides of the fence.” He disappointed his father by leaving the Welsh coal mines, moving into a white collar job and thereby seeming to look down on how his father had supported their family. She has been raised to be a flower-arranging ornament wife after making a Good Marriage all the while never using her brain. I winced in sympathy that not only her parents think she’s incapable of anything else but her lifelong friend does too. Ouch.

The growing emotional aspect to their relationship shows in how each feels able to confide in the other and tell their hopes for the future. how each inspires the other to face facts head on and be willing to make changes

The physical side of the issue is shown both in a delicate node to the mores of the time but still the heat is felt. The times when Geraint calls a halt speaks to his manners and care for Flora and makes sense in an age when he doesn’t want to cause her any future difficulties in marriage or risk tying her to a man who might come back from the front as a shell of the person she married.

With time running out, I was about to shake Geraint for not being as brave about his feelings as Flora yet it’s her strength that calls to an answering emotion in him which wins the day. B

The second story begins two years into war and prewar conventions have been blown to hell. Take what you want and need when you can get is the order of the day – quite unlike the reality of life before the war. Even Robbie’s stiff necked mother has noticed the change and has changed a bit herself from the woman who didn’t want her daughter marrying a son of a Welsh coal miner.

Robbie is on leave in Paris when he meets his HEA though neither he nor Sylvie wants one. Both have 1,000 mile stares and sense a sameness of their feelings namely to grab at anything that may spark some relief, even for a small while. But both are afraid to feel again, to be willing to risk their emotions again, to begin to care for another person whom they might lose.

Good on her that Sylvie as much in control and in charge as Robbie during sex. Both feel awkward afterwards, are almost mystified by their loss of control and stunned by what happens. At this point, both also feel it was sex and not love.

The feelings of love begin later during their letters when they slowly start to open up and then reveal to each other things they’ve never told others. They feel that now their lives are divided into a “before each other” and an “after we met.” Their relationship progresses swiftly via post but again turns awkward when they finally meet again face to face.

But they’re not perfect together and disagree on the war and duty yet they talk and listen and open their minds to another POV. Gradually these two, who never thought of the future, begin to hope for one, to work towards one and dream of one together. It takes another lightning bolt of realization for them to be willing to risk it all but it all comes together and works for me. B+

Finally on to the third novella which is, sadly, a mess. It starts as well as the first two novellas. The war is finally over and celebrations are going full tilt. VAD Sheila meets a French officer. They dance, they feel a spark and both let down their guard for a hot encounter. Afterwards, an embarrassed Sheila hurries away before an equally befuddled Luc can gather himself together.

Months later in Scotland, Sheila is discouraged to discover that her nursing experience counts for little in post-war Britain though her former employers would be willing to take her back on as a domestic. But she’s seen some of the world and refuses to go back to that. Bully for Sheila, I thought. Her chance comes when the Carmichael family decides to turn their Scottish estate into a hospital helping the war wounded. If Sheila can impress the foreign doctor arriving to take over operations, her future could be brighter than being in service.

Of course we all know who will be arriving as the new doctor. As well, since the hospital is where Sheila used to work, many of the trustees see her as a “wee lass” or servant – or both. She has to impress everyone with her organizational skills and most of all not give them any reason to dismiss her. With all her hopes riding on how she acts and is perceived, it should be a no brainer for how Sheila should act. But it isn’t.

Basically Sheila Luc’s relationship boils down to a sex scene, followed by ‘we’re appalled at what we’ve done,” time lapse then repeat, rinse and repeat. I didn’t feel I saw these two fall in love so much as repeat bad judgments and actions then be horrified and dismayed before doing it all over again. He can’t commit to a relationship and she can’t risk having people think she’s sleeping her way to a position but they keep going against what they’re preaching to themselves without me ever seeing any changes in their circumstances that would lead me to think they’ve grown or learned. Then suddenly Sheila feels she’s in love and Luc thinks he’s in love and voila! it’s all solved. No, I didn’t see it and found it a sad let down end to the book. D

~Jayne

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REVIEW:  Betrayed, Betrothed and Bedded by Juliet Landon

REVIEW: Betrayed, Betrothed and Bedded by Juliet Landon

betrayed-betrothed-and-bedded

THE GAME OF LOVE IS A DANGEROUS ONE IN THE COURT OF HENRY VIII…

Betrayed by an ambitious father, forcibly betrothed to the handsome yet enigmatic Sir Jon Raemon and soon to be bedded by the covetous King Henry, Virginia D’Arvall is the female pawn in a masculine game of desire, power and lust.

Ginny is determined to keep her honor, but in these dangerous courtly games, she will need to have her wits about her like never before. Will she realize that in Sir Jon she may just have all the love and protection she needs to survive?

Dear Ms. Landon,

Recently I’d been thinking of how long it had been since I read a Tudor era book which lead me to try and recall what I might have in my TBR piles and files to satisfy my era itch. Then Lo and Behold a scan of the current Harlequin Historical offerings yielded this cover and (the slightly cringe worthy title) “Betrayed, Betrothed and Bedded.” Perfect timing. It’s also been a while since I read an arranged marriage plot. This trope usually only works for me in a historical and I like it best without any Fated Mates stuff so the book was a double treat.

First off, I thought it had good period feel. There’s cold, sweat, lots of laces to deal with on the clothing, slow travel, loyal retainers, bulky headdresses, not much mention of bathing unless one was hot and sweaty and travel stained, arranged marriages and a lusty king. It’s also a sad view of childhood and the way most parents would view small children as better off barely seen and not worth much interest. Of course the way parents manipulated and ordered even adult children around is hard to imagine these days. Marriages are power and dynastic unions in which love has little part.

Intrigues are front and center and the flavor of every day with the Howard family angling for power again while the nasty Thomas Culpeper tries to shove Ginny under the King’s nose in place of the woman he loves? lusts after? However half of Ginny’s family won’t win any awards for the way they tried to slide into favors based on the King’s plan to turn her into his mistress once she was safely married. The way the other half attempts to shield her from the King’s bed lead to some chilling scenes of frightfully close calls and fears for their ultimate safety.

The descriptions of life at court have a “you are there” vibe which allows us to see how the vapid sycophants who surrounded the king were at his beck and call while they schemed and plotted. It seems that court life was an endless round of courtiers attempting to fill their days and amuse the King. I also enjoyed the sympathetic view of Anna of Cleves and have always wondered if she ever realized how lucky she was not to have caught Henry’s interest. To me, this stuff was the true strength of the novel.

The romance and relationship of Jon and Ginny felt weaker. When they first meet, Ginny feels she’s fallen in love at first sight. Later thoughts of Jon lead me to believe he felt the same way. A socially advantageous marriage Jon enters instead then causes Ginny much heartache before his wife dies in childbirth. Then she becomes snubs him at court before their marriage is arranged. Ginny then weathervanes about how she feels for Jon. It’s almost “in this chapter I’m supposed to hate him” followed by “oh, now I love him.” But she is a young woman with little experience in men or falling in love so I suppose it makes sense even if it does get annoying trying to keep track of which way she feels today.

I also got tired of the “Big, Dark Secret that Jon can’t possibly tell her until he feels she trusts him” hanging over the story. When it’s revealed, it does make sense why he would wait to tell her something that could be used against him – after all she is young and not as adept at hiding her feelings from other courtiers. And the dark politics swirling around court wouldn’t lead to easily trusting when tomorrow you could lose your head. Still the fact that we come so close to the truth yet no one fills Ginny in on Jon’s first wife felt a bit of a tease after a while.

My final grade is a bit of this crossed with a little of that. The romance is frustrating as it seems to circle back around over old ground a few times before finally getting home. But the behind the scenes view of a spoiled King to whom one did not say no and how events and lives could turn on a penny and said King’s whim was truly frightening. B-

~Jayne

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