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Thursday News: Diversity in publishing, Litrate wants to take on Goodreads, Teju Cole on James Baldwin, and 86-year-old debut Romance novelist

Thursday News: Diversity in publishing, Litrate wants to take on Goodreads,...

Educating others in the business is just part of the job for Davis, but it might not be so necessary if there were more people of color in the industry. She believes that a company like Simon & Schuster is trying, but she says it’s not easy to attract young people. Starting salaries are so low, few can afford to take a job in publishing. –NPR

LitRate is our dream for a new website for the literary community. It will essentially be our version of Goodreads—but better. We’ve seen all your ideas, all your complaints, and all your dreams of new features. We’re here and ready to implement them in a new site that we can build together! –Litrate

If Leukerbad was his mountain pulpit, the United States was his audience. The remote village gave him a sharper view of what things looked like back home. He was a stranger in Leukerbad, Baldwin wrote, but there was no possibility for blacks to be strangers in the United States, nor for whites to achieve the fantasy of an all-white America purged of blacks. This fantasy about the disposability of black life is a constant in American history. It takes a while to understand that this disposability continues. It takes whites a while to understand it; it takes non-black people of color a while to understand it; and it takes some blacks, whether they’ve always lived in the U.S. or are latecomers like myself, weaned elsewhere on other struggles, a while to understand it. American racism has many moving parts, and has had enough centuries in which to evolve an impressive camouflage. It can hoard its malice in great stillness for a long time, all the while pretending to look the other way. Like misogyny, it is atmospheric. You don’t see it at first. But understanding comes. –The New Yorker

While she’s proud of the buzz her steamy story has generated, she never dreamed of being a writer and had only taken one creative writing class when she was younger. Gorringe, a fan of “Fifty Shades of Grey,” has no plans for a second novel. For now, she’s just enjoying the spotlight. –ABC/Yahoo

Monday News: Tablet sales decline, more self-publishing data scraping, Goodreads looks at unfinished books, and a Romance summer reading challenge

Monday News: Tablet sales decline, more self-publishing data scraping, Goodreads looks...

The study forecasts that in 2014 the year-on-year growth rate of tablet PC sales — once a primary growth driver for the smart device market, especially after the iPad debuted in 2010 — will fall 14%, a revised estimate that docked NPD’s original predicted growth rate by 3%. By 2017, the rate will slow to single digits. –Time

As an author, I was curious about the exact numbers of independent titles in certain genres. So, after scraping some eBook metadata from Amazon and Barnes & Noble, I compiled some interesting figures which reflect the trends of self-publishing over the last few months –I Hate The Sounds Around Me

The top five most abandoned contemporary books included J. K. Rowling’s “The Casual Vacancy,” “Fifty Shades of Grey,” and “Eat Pray Love.” “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” and “Wicked” were also frequently discarded.

And when it came to the most frequently started but unfinished books ever, they were all classics: “Catch-22,” “The Lord of the Rings,” “James Joyce’s Ulysses,” “Moby Dick,” and “Atlas Shrugged” were the five least-finished books. –Business Insider

To help you discover all the different possibilities within the genre of romance, we have put together this Romance Genres Check List. It breaks romance into smaller subgenres such as contemporary, historical and paranormal — and then breaks those categories down even further so you can check them off as you read. Make your own goal for the summer such as reading every subgenre of historical romance. That alone will take you from hunky highlanders to roguish dukes and Wild West gun slingers. Or give your taste buds even more to try by reading at least one from every one of the more general categories. Better yet, go whole hog and check off every box on the list. –Shelf Talk