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Wednesday News: Silicon Valley’s lack of diversity, Technology and the future of education, social media and group mourning, and ebook subscription services

Wednesday News: Silicon Valley’s lack of diversity, Technology and the future...

At first glance, Apple has better workplace diversity statistics than many peers. But look at the numbers for technology employees and management—the people who have the most influence and the highest salaries within the companies—and consider the gender gap in each of these groups, and things start to get much more homogenous. Apple only slightly raises what’s a very low bar—which is something not lost on CEO Tim Cook. –Quartz

Yes, historically, technology has killed certain types of jobs while creating others. But what we’re seeing happen right now isn’t merely a redistribution of unskilled jobs to other sectors over the course of a couple decades, or the outsourcing of factory workers to other countries or cities with better tax breaks.

Instead, it’s wiping out entire industries, entire swaths of the economy, in years, not decades. And it’s killing white collar jobs as frequently as it’s killing blue collar ones. –Vice

What I get from the network during such events is something similar to what happens when we hear about a friend who has passed away: a sense of shock and regret, but also funny stories about that person, snapshots in time that remind you of them and how they made you feel. Byers says in his post: “As for what I thought about — what movie, what stand-up routine, what quote — do you really care?” And my response would be yes, I do. Seeing people share their favorite movies and lines from Williams’ standup routines reminded me of what I loved about his comedy, and of the moments I remember watching his movies with others. –Gigaom

But there is a hitch, and it is a big one: While the services each offer hundreds of thousands of books, many newer books are not yet available through these subscriptions. That is because the services haven’t been able to reach deals with many of the major publishers, especially for new books. So unless you’re a truly voracious reader who doesn’t mind older books, you probably want to avoid adding this monthly charge. –New York Times

Tuesday News: New suit against Apple et al, the recession’s effect on the US economy, writer’s envy, and truly funny cat video

Tuesday News: New suit against Apple et al, the recession’s effect...

Judge Says Price-Fixing Suit Filed by Retailers Can Proceed – Judge Cote has ruled that an antitrust suit brought by independent bookseller DNAML against Apple et al can move forward, likely in tandem with Lavoho, LLC and Abbey House Media (formerly Diesel and Books on Board).

Question: Will these publishers ever get it? Amazon v. Hachette suggests maybe not.

Although Cote in her opinion said proving damages was going to be difficult “in the extreme” for the DNAML, she held that the plaintiff’s case met the standard to proceed. But while Cote suggested that proving damages might be difficult, she added that DNAML’s “lost investment,” in its business “may be reasonably quantifiable.”

“It is more than plausible that a discount retailer was harmed by a conspiracy to remove retailers’ ability to discount e-books,” the judge wrote in her order, adding that the retailers were “indisputably competitors in a market in which trade was restrained.” –Publishers Weekly

Here’s how the recession affected jobs in newsrooms, publishing, advertising, and more – 255 charts tell the story of “how the recession reshaped the economy,” including almost 500,000 jobs in traditional publishing lost, along with major losses (thus far unrecovered) in television, radio, and broadcast. Salaries for telecom resellers dipped the most, followed by salaries for those in newspaper publishing (not a big surprise). If you have like ten hours to spare, check out the charts. –Nieman Journalism Lab

Whose Writing Career Do You Most Envy? – These little Bookends pieces by Zoë Heller and Daniel Mendelsohn are sometimes pretty interesting, more, I think, for the questions and issues they raise, than for their actual answers. In this case, it’s what writer’s career do you envy, which bring up much philosophizing about how difficult it is to envy any writer’s career when you know too much about a writer, something that seems particularly poignant right now, with all the social media to which we have access. Still, some interesting questions around popularity and creativity, and how the patterns to many writers’ careers may be more similar than dissimilar.

The Greeks’ insistence that we consider the whole life before making final judgments has an interesting literary application. As a critic, I’m often struck by the way in which so many successful writers settle into a groove by midcareer: Whatever marked them as special, new, or distinctive when they started — the “thing” that set them on their path — becomes, with time, a franchise; at worst, a straitjacket. By the end, most of us repeat ourselves. Very few — perhaps only the greatest — continue to grow. Almost inevitably, the innovator of yesterday becomes the éminence grise of today. –New York Times

Nobody Believed Her When She Said Her Cat Does This. So She Set Up A Camera To Prove It. LOL! - I’m not usually one for cute cat videos, but this one is hilarious. Watch it, laugh, and enjoy the rest of your day. –Reshareworthy