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Thursday News: Barbara Freethy partners with Ingram; Richard Flanagan takes the Man Booker Prize; Anthony Horowitz ARC surprise; and Jules Verne amusement park.

Thursday News: Barbara Freethy partners with Ingram; Richard Flanagan takes the...

I think this venture is going to be a win-win-win for booksellers, readers and Indie authors like myself who have not been able to reach the print market outside of print-on-demand in the last few years. There’s been a void in the market, and the larger publishers have been unwilling to put bestselling digital titles by Indie authors into print without taking a piece of the digital pie. But with my partnership with Ingram, I’ll still maintain all of my digital rights. I’m very excited to have Ingram as a partner in this exciting new venture. And I’m so happy that readers will be able to get my books in any format they like from print to digital to audio! –barbarafreethy.com

“In Australia the Man Booker prize is sometimes seen as something of a chicken raffle,” he joked. “I just didn’t expect to end up the chicken.”

The novel is an incredibly personal book for Flanagan, whose father was a survivor of Japan’s campaign to build the railway. He died aged 98 on the day Flanagan emailed his final draft to his publisher.

“I grew up, as did my five siblings, as children of the Death Railway,” Flanagan said. “We carried many incommunicable things and I realised at a certain point … that I would have to write this book.” –The Guardian

Ms. Andreadis said that fewer than 2,000 copies had been sent out, and that Harper planned to reprint a new batch without the errors.

It is no big deal: Mr. Horowitz did not use unsavory language, abuse the copy editors, or expose some fantastic dispute between himself and his publishers. At most, there is firm authorial pushback. He just wants things the way he wants them. And he comes straight to the point: “I’M NOT CHANGING THIS.” –New York Times

In 2007, Nantes opened the combined art installation and amusement park on the site of a former shipyard. Les Machines offers both carnival-style rides for which anyone can purchase a ticket, and smaller machines demonstrated by visitors selected from the crowd. The result is a kind of steampunk amusement park, and a breathtaking juxtaposition of old, new – and weird. –BBC Travel

Friday News: Vook buys Byliner, reading habits of Millennials, banishing U2 from your iPhone, and Tahari’s low-tech, high-tech fashion

Friday News: Vook buys Byliner, reading habits of Millennials, banishing U2...

The deal may be good news for Byliner authors who wondered how they were going to get paid: Vook said Thursday that it would be paying them 85 percent royalties on works that were already for sale at digital retailers like Amazon and Apple. That is a different financial model than the one used by Byliner, which paid authors a flat fee and then split royalties with them 50-50. –Gigaom

Millennials’ lives are full of technology, but they are more likely than their elders to say that important information is not available on the internet. Some 98% of those under 30 use the internet, and 90% of those internet users say they use social networking sites. Over three-quarters (77%) of younger Americans have a smartphone, and many also have a tablet (38%) or e-reader (24%). Despite their embrace of technology, 62% of Americans under age 30 agree there is “a lot of useful, important information that is not available on the internet,” compared with 53% of older Americans who believe that. At the same time, 79% of Millennials believe that people without internet access are at a real disadvantage. –Pew Internet

If you don’t really want U2 to come up next time you put your phone on shuffle, there’s no way to permanently detach the album from your account, but there are ways to hide it so that you never have to lay ears on it. –Ars Technica