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Thursday News: SCOTUS denies cert in Superman case, interview with Zane, Black women in British history exhibit, and Gif enhanced manuscripts

Thursday News: SCOTUS denies cert in Superman case, interview with Zane,...

That agreement was executed in the aftermath of Shuster’s death, when Peavy wrote to Warner subsidiary DC and asked the company to pay her brother’s final debts and expenses. DC agreed and also increased survivor benefits, but the company’s executive vp at the time, Paul Levitz, admonished, “This agreement would represent the author/heir’s last and final deal with DC and would fully resolve any past, present or future claims against DC.” –Hollywood Reporter

TR: Addicted pushed a lot of boundaries in its exploration of black women’s sexuality when it was released. How do you think the perception of black women’s sexuality has changed since Addicted came out?

Zane: I think women are more open about their feelings; they feel more liberated. I’ve had many women in their 40s and 50s tell me that they had never had an orgasm. Reading my books has made them open up enough to say what [they] want. If you really want someone to fall in love with you, the real you, you have to be transparent about who you are. And that includes your sexuality. There is nothing wrong with having desires—everybody has fantasies. –The Root

Now the organisers of an exhibition at the recently opened Black Cultural Archives (in Windrush Square in Brixton, south London) are hoping to skewer some myths regarding black life in the British Isles. The archives’ inaugural exhibition, Re-imagine: Black Women in Britain, has brought together a number of black women who made the country their home over the centuries. The stories of these women and their contributions to British life are a necessary corrective to the idea that we are somehow “new” to Britain. Consider Mary Prince, an enslaved woman from Bermuda – whose personal account of slavery was published in 1831, and was the first account of the life of a black woman in Britain. “I have been a slave myself,” she wrote. “The man that says slaves be quite happy in slavery – that they don’t want to be free – that man is either ignorant or a lying person. I never heard a slave say so.” She eventually lived and worked at the home of the Scottish writer Thomas Pringle, secretary of the Anti-Slavery Society. –The Guardian

Tuesday News: New AT&T breach, Conan Doyle Estate pays up (again), Facebook now owns WhatsApp, and interesting analysis of piracy

Tuesday News: New AT&T breach, Conan Doyle Estate pays up (again),...

As per the notification, the employee accessed a master customer data base file called Customer Proprietary Network Information (CPNI) without proper authorization. This CPNI happens to be the master data card of a customer on AT&T network and contains all valid and valuable information about the customer. It is generated by AT&T once you buy any type of service from AT&T and the insider who carried out the breach apparently knew this. –Tech Worm

“[T]he estate was playing with fire in asking Amazon and other booksellers to cooperate with it in enforcing its nonexistent copyright claims against Klinger. For it was enlisting those sellers in a boycott of a competitor of the estate, and boycotts of competitors violate the antitrust laws.”

The circuit court applauded Klinger for acting, in effect, as “a private attorney general, combating a disreputable business practice—a form of extortion.” Judge Posner admonished the Doyle estate: “It’s time the estate, in its own self-interest, changed its business model.” –National Law Review

WhatsApp, which has more than 600 million monthly users, is among a new crop of mobile messaging and social media apps that have become increasingly popular among younger users. Snapchat, a privately owned mobile app that allows users to swap photos that can disappear after a few seconds, is raising money at a $10 billion valuation, according to media reports. –CNBC

People watch more paid, legal content than ever, but they also continue to download huge amounts of illegal content. “Piracy is putting pressure on antiquated business models, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing,” said Brett Danaher, an economics professor at Wellesley College who studies Internet piracy. “But the prevalence of piracy shows that people are growing up in a culture of free, and that is not good for the future of entertainment, either.” . . .

Content providers, Mr. Swanston [CEO of Tru Optik] says, will eventually have to consider new delivery models that are more closely aligned with how people behave. He imagines collaborations with streaming services to release content or simultaneously scheduling theater and digital streaming releases — ideas he hopes his company can help bring about. Some companies, like BitTorrent, which makes file-sharing technology, are already experimenting in this arena. –The New York Times