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condoms

Wednesday News: Holiday Bells; Condoms; and the case of the manufactured discovery problem

Wednesday News: Holiday Bells; Condoms; and the case of the manufactured...

I think publishers just really want readers to have discovery problems, so we can all be in the same boat. I have been working with readers for years, and I have heard many, many, many complaints from them in re: books. I have heard them complain that they have too much to read, and I have heard them complain that their favorite authors don’t write fast enough, and I have heard them complain that the book they want to read is not in paperback yet, and I have heard them complain that they will never catch up with their book piles, and I have heard them complain that their spouse has asked them to stop buying books for six months, and I have heard them complain that certain famous authors haven’t been writing as well, and I have heard them complain that there is too much good TV right now and it’s basically impossible to balance reading time and TV time anymore. (I myself have also levied each of these complaints.) What I do not hear them say is that they can’t find anything to read. Now, to be fair, I mostly deal with readers in bookstores, in libraries, and online, which are places designed for book discovery. Bookavore

Monday News: Harlequin print and digital consumer sites merge; Kobo says it will be a billion dollar company in 2014; New medical HIV prevention device

Monday News: Harlequin print and digital consumer sites merge; Kobo says...

Kobo has chased the “heavy reader” segment in particular. Book buying resembles many consumer markets, where the 80/20 rule operates: 20% of the customers buy 80% of the product. So by Kobo targeting heavy users, they can efficiently sell a larger volume. It’s difficult to get comparable figures internationally, but according to management consultant (and my colleague) Brian O’Leary, the average U.S. consumer buys about 4 books per year, and the frequent buyer purchases 12 to 45 books per year. Humphrey reports that his readers via a Kobo device buy on average four books per month, or 48 per year. Forbes

The upcoming clinical trial, to be conducted in November at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, will evaluate the ring in 60 women over 14 days. The trial will assess the ring’s safety and measure how much of the drug is released and the properties of the ring after use.

The ring stays in place for 30 days.  The ring can be used deliver other drugs in the future such as contraceptives or other STI killers. Maybe a new and better condom doesn’t need to be invented? News | McCormick School of Engineering | Northwestern University