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BEA

Tuesday News: Computational literacy, Diana Norman’s daughter finishes mother’s book, cool bookstores, and Dear Author gets love at BEA

Tuesday News: Computational literacy, Diana Norman’s daughter finishes mother’s book, cool...

But let’s back up a step: What if learning to code weren’t actually the most important thing? It turns out that rather than increasing the number of kids who can crank out thousands of lines of JavaScript, we first need to boost the number who understand what code can do. As the cities that have hosted Code for America teams will tell you, the greatest contribution the young programmers bring isn’t the software they write. It’s the way they think. It’s a principle called “computational thinking,” and knowing all of the Java syntax in the world won’t help if you can’t think of good ways to apply it. –Mother Jones

Because instead of grieving for her as desperately as I would have done otherwise, I was able to continue a dialogue with her — coming to terms with her physical loss by climbing inside her head; thinking her thoughts and writing with her voice, which, to me anyway, still sounded so strong.

I even adopted her writing regime, and would sit from 9am until 5pm at my computer at home in London, tapping away; and then, in the evenings, re-reading her books to make sure I had her style.

When news of what I was doing spread, I was contacted by many of her friends and fellow writers, offering their support — which I found enormously comforting. After eight months, the manuscript had to be delivered. Mum never missed a deadline, so I couldn’t be late. –The Daily Mail

A few weeks ago we had the opportunity to attend BookExpo America (BEA), the largest annual publishing event in North America. The event, held this year in New York City, was attended by over 750 authors and 1,000 exhibitors from the publishing industry. In addition to author events and exhibitions, the BEA Bloggers Conference took place. We found out about some great new blogs while attending BEA and decided to share some of our favorites. –Book Vibe Blog

Monday News: Do small pubs benefit from Amazon v. Hachette, Jay Lake dies, (no) diversity at BEA, and slut-shaming and social class

Monday News: Do small pubs benefit from Amazon v. Hachette, Jay...

“All the anti-Amazon stuff lately would have you believe that Amazon is squeezing all of the publishers,” Shepard told Business Insider. “I don’t know what they do with the big guys, but for us, what Amazon has created is the best outcome that one could possibly deal with.”

         Shepard feels that Amazon has democratized the book market: He says that small publishers no longer    need to buy publicity, because their books will get just as much room online as Hachette titles.

“They’re preserving a literary culture, not just best sellers,” he says. “This is a very good thing.” –Business Insider

Among Lake’s numerous honors were a quarterly first prize in the Writers of the Future contest in 2003 and the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer in Science Fiction in 2004. His writing has appeared in many publications, including Interzone, Strange Horizons, Asimov’s Science Fiction, and the Mammoth Book of Best New Horror. He was an editor for the “Polyphony” anthology series from Wheatland Press, and was also a contributor to the Internet Review of Science Fiction. Lake’s final collection, The Last Plane to Heaven, an anthology featuring thirty of his short stories, will be available September 2014. –Tor.com

Non-whites are virtually absent from BookExpo planning committees and prime promotional slots. Tavis Smiley is the only non-white among the 16 scheduled breakfast and author tea speakers, who also include Jodi Picoult, Lena Dunham and Anjelica Huston. There is little non-white representation for various other high-profile events, from “Buzz” forums for upcoming adult, young adult and middle grade releases to an all-white panel that will discuss discrepancies between how men and women fiction writers are treated.

“I don’t have a good answer for you,” said BookExpo event director Steven Rosato, who noted that publishers submit candidates for panels and other gatherings. “Clearly, there’s a gap between the industry and what’s representative of the country.” –ABC News

“Viewing women only as victims of men’s sexual dominance fails to hold women accountable for the roles they play in reproducing social inequalities,” Elizabeth Armstrong, a sociology and organizational studies professor at the University of Michigan, said in a release. “By engaging in ‘slut-shaming’ — the practice of maligning women for presumed sexual activity — women at the top create more space for their own sexual experimentation, at the cost of women at the bottom of social hierarchies.” –Al Jazeera America