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REVIEW:  Perfect Alignment by KB Alan

REVIEW: Perfect Alignment by KB Alan

Dear KB Alan:
Perfect alginment KB AlanThis is an erotic romance featuring a college senior who gets pulled over for speeding while on her way to Boston to visit friends and spend the evening at a fetish nightclub. At the time of the traffic stop, Emma is wearing a special pendant that denotes her sexual preferences as a submissive. She enjoys the club and the encounters she’s had there but it’s three hours away from her college and it’s impossible maintain a relationship with anyone she meets given the distance, her busy schedule of work and school.

Drew is on his way home after a long shift when a car goes speeding by. He stops her, gives her a ticket, notices her necklace and…then asks her to step out of the car. He acknowledges that he shouldn’t be doing this and Emma notes that this isn’t the club and he’s trusting her not to report his admittedly inappropriate behavior to the authorities.

The two share a hot scene and then agree that he would come up to Boston to meet her. Instead of going to the club, Emma has another intense encounter with Drew and they decided to continue seeing each other–for the sole purpose of physical release–back home where Drew lives and works not far from Emma.

Emma reasons that because she’s in her last year of college and plans to move back home and help her parents run their store, she might as well enjoy herself in a no commitment, physical pleasure only relationship. For her, though, she begins to develop feelings quickly for Drew. Their relationship isn’t solely sexual. They begin to do couple-y things such as watch movies and make dinner.

The first half of the book establishes their relationship and toward the middle part, I started getting bored. The sex in the story was fine but nothing I hadn’t read before and because it wasn’t emotion based in the beginning, it didn’t hold me interest as the story moved on.

However, once Drew began enforcing the barriers to any true relationship, the emotional drama took off. Initially Drew is presented as not wanting to play so close to home, worried it would cost him his job. Later, however, the conflict morphs into Drew not wanting any relationship at all. His parents are cold and unhappy. His best friend retreated inside himself after his wife died. Drew doesn’t want a vanilla relationship but he’s also scared of a relationship with a sexually compatible woman too.

There’s an air of reality in the story. It doesn’t rely on over the top angst but instead presents a possible real life dilemma. One guy who’s afraid of committing and one girl who’s future doesn’t allow her to commit. Even the mundane part of the story lends itself to enhancing the realism in some ways.

The cover says it is a short story but my guess is this is category length. I didn’t feel that it was too short because the issues of conflict were all well addressed by the end including how the two would work through their relationship after Emma graduates from college.

The BDSM is very mild and while I wasn’t annoyed by the menage, it didn’t fit well other than to emphasize that this was an Erotic Romance. I kept waiting for some kind of greater emotional impact from the menage, but it never arrived.

The second half is much better than the first and I’m glad I powered through but the slow parts during the set up of the relationship almost had me abandoning the book. In the end, though, I was intrigued by the couple’s dilemma and I enjoyed the resolution which I felt was true to the characters. B-/C+

Best regards,

Jane

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REVIEW:  Bound by Lorelie James

REVIEW: Bound by Lorelie James

Bound Lorelei James

Dear Ms. James:

I went into this book with some great expectations but ended it disappointed and not interested in reading the second book of the series. This story pairs up Ronin Black with Amery Hardwick. It contains some of the most fetishistic portrayal of Japanese cultural (without any actual minority in the story) I’ve read in a long time along with some poor dialogue, strained conflicts, and unsexy love scenes.

Let’s start with the issue regarding the cultural appropriation in the story. Ronin Black is described as having high cheekbones and a wide, chiseled jawline courtesy of Germanic or Nordic genes in his lineage. and eyes that tilted upward in the corner, “indicating his family tree also included an Asian branch. His black hair nearly brushed his shoulders.” That’s not so bad although Japanese have high cheekbones and it’s rather common to ascribe the cheekbones and chiseled jawline to European genes and the tilted eyes to Asia.

Ronin is one quarter Japanese but his life is 100% Japanese. He has Shunga prints in his halls; he runs a dojo and is disdainful of Brazilian jitjitsu. He has a zen rock garden on his roof and bonsai trees. He says he lives by the “Samurai code.” I’m not even certain how Ronin is actually one quarter Japanese as we learn that his father was a serviceman stationed in Japan and was also one quarter Japanese. I guess that makes his mother one quarter Japanese in a land that’s one of the most homogenous in the world. Ahem. I don’t even want to start contemplating how a Japanese mother would name her child after a disgraced, itinerant and masterless warrior.

Ronin prefers to be addressed as Sensei Black, trained in a monastery and has had a run-in with rival martial arts experts that the heroine refers to as “Karate Kid” like. Even Ronin’s sexual fetish is rope bondage learned from his monastery master in Japan.

But it’s not just the portrayal of Ronin who, maybe I could accept, but Amery’s interaction with him. Amery constantly refers to his “ninja skills” and his “Zen sayings.” The evil ex is apparently Japanese and Amery refers to her as a geisha and exotic. “She had a better idea what Naomi looked like—probably exotic in that Japanese geisha way.” Later meeting another Amery’s sister, Amery describes her as exotic as well and refers to the Japanese woman’s bodyguard as sumo wrestler or just “Sumo Guy”. Even Ronin is described as exotic as well as his cologne. The sister must be one quarter Japanese because she and Ronin share the same parents but the sister is described as Japanese by Amery. Yet Ronin is not.

To round out the weeaboo nature of this book is that Amery has a scar that she got after being gored by a bull that is amazingly shaped in the Kanji letters of Ronin. ““Because it’s nearly identical to the Japanese symbol for a rogue samurai warrior.” NEARLY IDENTICAL

Um, wow. That is some amazing scab picking. What made me laugh/cry even more is that Amery’s skin is described as white and pure. (She, of course, thinks it is pasty, but our 1/4 Japanese hero thinks it’s pure).

But let’s set that all aside for now and talk about the romance. This is one half of a duology and I think the conflict really suffers from having to stretch beyond one book. Amery is from a fundamentalist upbringing and sometimes her interactions with Ronin are colored by her shame and others it is because Ronin can’t bring himself to reveal anything more than his Japanese fetish to her and at other times it is Ronin’s possible violent nature. Because, you know, owning a dojo and all where she’s learning self defense equals being a violet thug.

Their interactions don’t even read particularly sexy to me. At one point, he’s practicing his “tethered turtle” technique and they make lusty turtle innuendos. . “Come out of that shell and beg me to fuck you, turtle girl.” He later tells her that since she won’t perform with him, he has to use other models and will be touching them with sexual manner. I wish she would have responded that she’d be practicing her massage techniques complete with a rub and tug ending but don’t worry, Ronin, it don’t mean anything.

In sum, I found this book to be offensive with stilted dialogue, an ever changing set of conflicts, and decidedly unsexy love scenes. The strange thing is that I’ve enjoyed Lorelei James books in the past. This is such a departure. It felt forced and awkward. You know, if you’re going to write a character who loves all things Japanese and speaks it at random times, why not just make him Japanese? F

Best regards,

Jane

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