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Wednesday News: Amazon in talks with Simon & Schuster, more on Amazon’s possible ambitions, Harlequin as case study, and beachside libraries

Wednesday News: Amazon in talks with Simon & Schuster, more on...

Amazon in Talks with Simon & Schuster – Acquisition? – Several outlets have reported that Amazon is in negotiations with Simon & Schuster, although the content of the talks is currently unknown. Confirmation of the talks came from Les Moonves himself, president of CBS, which owns Simon & Schuster, and Reuters has a link to the talk in which Moonves made the comment. Nate Hoffelder floats the possibility of Amazon attempting to acquire S&S, rather than merely engaging in early contract talks:

That is a crazy idea, yes, but hear me out. Before you send for the trank guns, just remember that in the past 6 months I accurately called the Dropbox-Readmill deal, the Comixology acquisition, and the Nook Media spin off.
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To put it simply, Simon & Schuster is the smallest of the Big 5, and there’s no real connection between it and its parent company – not like there is for the 4 other major US trade publishers.

With $800 million in revenue in 2013, S&S is the smallest of the major US trade publishers (in terms of revenue). It is a wholly owned sub of CBS, a $15 billion a year company with operations mainly in the US. –The Digital Reader

Amazon, a Friendly Giant as Long as It’s Fed – I’m not sure how many more angles there are to the Amazon-Hachette battle to investigate, but you know the media outlets will keep trying. This piece from the New York Times has a couple interesting features, including a discussion of the extent to which Amazon has been working with academic publishers, as well as their push for POD rights when a book is not immediately available for shipment.

Academic houses traditionally sell their books, which are labor-intensive and printed in small quantities, for smaller discounts than general publishers do. Amazon will have none of that. “I offered them a 30 percent discount, and they demanded 40,” said Karen Christensen of Berkshire Publishing, a small academic house in Great Barrington, Mass.

Amazon, as usual, got what it wanted. Then it asked for 45 percent.

“Where do I find that 5 percent?” Ms. Christensen asked. “Amazon may be able to operate at a loss, but I’m not in a position to do that.”

Ms. Christensen, like other publishers, complains that Amazon is very inventive with fees and charges that rapidly add up.

But at the same time, Amazon has made itself essential to Berkshire, which publishes a three-volume dictionary of Chinese biography that sells for $595. Amazon is responsible for about 15 percent of Berkshire’s business. Ms. Christensen feels that she can’t leave Amazon but fears what else it might ask. “I wake up every single day knowing Amazon might make new, impossible demands,” she said.

Amazon has been reported to be seeking a new concession from publishers: If a customer orders a book and it is not immediately available, it wants the right to print the volume itself. An Amazon spokesman said it does not compel publishers to use the technology but offers it as a service. The customer wants the book immediately, so this makes obvious sense. But it chips away yet again at the publisher’s role. –New York Times

The evolution of the Harlequin case: Assessing e-book opportunities – Although not as detailed as I had hoped, this video on Harlequin as a case study project for graduate students at Western University’s Ivey Business School (Canada) is still interesting, in part because of the way Harlequin executives engaged with the students and their ideas about how Harlequin should manage their digital publishing opportunities. It’s a relatively short video, and I haven’t looked to see if some of the projects are available online, but it would be interesting to see what the students came up with in more detail. –Ivey Business School

Beachfront Libraries Are Pretty Much The Best Idea Ever – I don’t know what the weather is like where you live, but here on the West Coast of the US. it’s freaking hot. Which gives way to thoughts of the beach, and of the soothing sound of the ocean (gee, do you think I might need a vacation?!). I have yet to see a beachside library out here, but what a brilliant idea. Check out some of the locations – outside of getting sand in the books, it seems like a pretty ingenuous use for paper books.

Pop-up libraries are a growing trend at beaches around the world, according to Atlas Obscura. In May, Bulgaria’s Black Sea resort, Albena, reopened its beach library for the second summer in a row. The library houses more than 6,000 books. –Huffington Post

Monday News: Seattle booksellers, RIP Amiri Baraka, Kamloops newspaper shuts down, Elsevier redux, and an American writer in Japan

Monday News: Seattle booksellers, RIP Amiri Baraka, Kamloops newspaper shuts down,...

“‘I don’t do anything differently because of Amazon’s presence,’ says Lara Hamilton, owner of Book Larder and of the Kim Ricketts Book Events speakers series, which brings authors to places like Microsoft. ‘Amazon’s reach is global, so the only thing that likely differentiates my experience from that of booksellers in other places is that I have plenty of Amazon employees as customers. I want Book Larder to provide a great experience, whether the customer is shopping for the perfect cookbook, taking a cooking class, or attending an author talk. Experienced humans are still better at the delivery of all of those things.’” Publishers Weekly

“But I think in that circle, those people generally were fighting against the academic life — academic poetry of the ’50s. Whether you’re talking about Ginsberg and the Beats or you’re talking … the Black Mountain school [of poetry] or you’re talking about Frank O’Hara and the New York school … they were all aligned, I think, in a kind of united front against the dullness of the new critics and the dullness of the kind of poetry [those critics were] trying to bring back.” NPR

“The end of the newspaper after about 80 years, and the fact that the bustling community of about 83,000 people will be without a daily paper, dramatically highlights the challenges facing the newspaper industry as past models for financial success are challenged by shifts in advertising, declining circulation and the Internet.” The Globe and Mail

“Many advocates of open access make a moral case for it, too, arguing that freely available research is a public good—and that much of it is paid for by taxpayers in the first place. Ross Mounce, a palaeontologist at the University of Bath, in England, and an advocate of open access, is enthusiastic about what has happened. “This”, he says, referring to the row, “has been great [for open-access advocates]. Lots of people who were completely apathetic before are starting to realise the importance of how we distribute scientific research.”” The Economist

“In a daze, I was paraded before the press, blinded by flashbulbs and tracked by TV cameras. But because I couldn’t understand the directions, I often talked to the wrong camera, stared into space or even leaned on the scenery — until my intrepid and glamorous young translator told the reporters to wave if they wanted David-san to look at their cameras, like a baby at a birthday party. I watched the film with her whispering in my ear: ‘He is the detective.’ It was as if I had fallen asleep and had a weird dream about my own book. At the end, when the lights came up and I stood to leave, she tapped my shoulder and pointed. The audience was clapping wildly. For me. I took a few deep bows and fled.” New York Times