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Medallion Press Officially an Indie Imprint

Medallion Press, a publisher of genre fiction, is now going to be distributed worldwide by Independent Publishers Group. This means good things for its authors who will see a wider in-store presence. We interviewed Editor Helen Rosburg earlier this year.

Via Alison Kent, author of upcoming The Perfect Stranger whose steamy sex scenes in the jungle apparently upset one reviewer. Kind of makes you want to run out and buy the book.

Jane Litte is the founder of Dear Author, a lawyer, and a lover of pencil skirts. She spends her downtime reading romances and writing about them. Her TBR pile is much larger than the one shown in the picture and not as pretty. You can reach Jane by email at jane @ dearauthor dot com

10 Comments

  1. Eva Gale
    Mar 01, 2007 @ 17:41:36

    Like I needed an excuse…

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  2. MB
    Mar 01, 2007 @ 18:20:22

    I went off and read Ms Kent’s ‘explaination’ of her upset with the reviewer. Based on her own mini-spoilers and my knowledge of the legal definition of rape, not the generic one she picked off of dictionary.com, I have to side with the reviewer with regard to their being rape in the book. Ms. Kent screwed up and is now CYAing… why do author’s do that?

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  3. Jane
    Mar 01, 2007 @ 18:24:11

    I’ve got the book and I am interested in seeing what the hubbub is about. That’s what hubbub does. It makes you curious. I’ve got a pretty good grip on the legal definition of rape, although I’ve never understood why some states call it sexual assault when the technical definition of assault is an attempt (ie., assault is the attempt and battery is the actual completion of the attempt) but whatever, you silly lawmakers.

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  4. Alison Kent
    Mar 01, 2007 @ 18:43:35

    [quote comment="24016"]I have to side with the reviewer with regard to their being rape in the book. Ms. Kent screwed up and is now CYAing… why do author’s do that?[/quote]

    Since I’ve spoken with the RT editor and had the reviewer point out the scene she is calling rape – one where the participants DO NOT EVEN TOUCH, and which is not even one of the three I assumed she had to be thinking of (since those DID involve touching) – MB, are you still blindly siding with a reviewer who obviously didn’t even read the scene?

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  5. Larissa Ione
    Mar 01, 2007 @ 18:48:51

    I’ve read the scene in question…the one the reviewer claims is rape…and the thing is, there isn’t even any sex! The would-be rapist never even TOUCHES the heroine after he inhales the drugs. I can only guess that the reviewer skimmed, assuming that a rape would follow, and THOUGHT a sexual act took place.

    NO sexual act takes place. It’s right there in black and white.

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  6. MB
    Mar 01, 2007 @ 19:05:51

    I still say that you have what could be construed as a rape scene in your book. You yourself state that the heroine has sex while drugged. Under the law, she is unable to give “free and informed consent”. This is rape. I doesn’t matter if she consented before, she’s drugged, that negates the consent. I have not seen the book and can only go by what you posted as a spoiler and my knowledge of the legal codes.

    You’ve written it, now you want to backstep and say you didn’t mean this at all. There will be others who, based on the spoilers you posted, will see this and think the same thing. I may be in a minority, but that’s my opinion and I’m sticking to it.

    Plus, controversy sells. I personally think this is the biggest point of posting that complaint about the review. You knew people would read that and agree or disagree based on what you posted and the snippet of the review as the book is not available to the general public yet. This generates discussion on reviews… and gets the ‘buzz’ started. To quote a dear friend of mine who I pointed this stuff out to – whatever!

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  7. Alison Kent
    Mar 01, 2007 @ 19:11:53

    [quote comment="24020"]I still say that you have what could be construed as a rape scene in your book. You yourself state that the heroine has sex while drugged. [/quote]

    Where did I say that? Where? Point it out, please. The spoiler did not say that AT all. No such thing happens in the book. Such a thing happened TEN YEARS BEFORE as my spoiler says. But that scene is NOT in the book, and therefore is NOT a “detailed sex scene” of “drug-induced rape” as the reviewer claims.

    And as to my reasons for posting the review? Did you read the comments and see how many readers had already noticed the comment about rape and done a double take? But . . . whatever.

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  8. Alison Kent
    Mar 01, 2007 @ 19:29:16

    [quote comment="24017"]I’ve got the book and I am interested in seeing what the hubbub is about. That’s what hubbub does. It makes you curious. [/quote]

    And, really. There shouldn’t be any hubbub at all. This book should blossom and then die on the vine as all mine do. ;)

    It’s just that I’ve been pissy for days about the biggest review publication out there telling their 135,000 subscribers (according to Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory) that I am writing rape scenes.

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  9. Robin
    Mar 01, 2007 @ 19:56:11

    Because of the highly charged nature of rape, I think it is unequivocally irresponsible of any reviewer to throw the word around without careful consideration of the scene in question and a clear discussion of the definition he/she is using in reading said scene. At the very least — and as someone who is also familiar with the legal definition(S) of rape, which vary from state to state — I think it’s unfair to indict an author without at least a reading of the actual scene in question. Rape statutes are often extremely specific and NARROW in their application rather than broad. That is, the legal elements of a charge of rape are more limited than what a lot of people consider rape. So if you’re going to a legal definition of rape, it’s generally more difficult to get a conviction on rape in many states because so many elements must be proven beyond a reasonable doubt, and a number of those elements hinge on how mnuch resistance or non-consent the woman can prove, let alone the actual physical parts required in the act for a legal conviction of rape.

    Jane — As to why it’s so often referred to as sexual assault, don’t you think it’s because of the history of rape law; that is, the way in which women have historically borne the burden of blame for sexual crimes? Heck, marital rape still has some status as an exception in a handful of states, and it wasn’t until the 80s that it began to disappear in earnest from many sex crime statutes. I think there are quite a few states where the law is still mired in a lot of the old expectations/judgments about rape that place an immense burden on the woman to withold consent or fight back or resist or any of the other conditions that have limited a conviction for rape historically. IIRC, some states actually include a legal definition of penetration as an element of the crime.

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  10. Jane
    Mar 01, 2007 @ 20:00:59

    Robin – I think it has to do with the lack of lawyers actually writing bills. I don’t know what the status of the legislature in your state, but there are only a few lawyers in my legislature. I’ve been sitting on some lobbying committees in the past few years and the drafting of these bills is beyond bad. But I don’t know what the historical drafting is of these bills so you could be right. It’s kind of an interesting concept.

    ReplyReply

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