Romance, Historical, Contemporary, Paranormal, Young Adult, Book reviews, industry news, and commentary from a reader's point of view

Book Reading During a Recession, Tips from Forbes

Forbes gives five* tips on how to maintain your reading habit in a tight economy.  
  1. Swap through online sites like paperbackswap.com.
  2. Compare prices online.
  3. Sell your old books.
  4. Try sites like Dailylit.com (I didn't really get this tip)
  5. Buy at the library.

*The headlines says six but the article says "five".

Jane Litte is the founder of Dear Author, a lawyer, and a lover of pencil skirts. She spends her downtime reading romances and writing about them. Her TBR pile is much larger than the one shown in the picture and not as pretty. You can reach Jane by email at jane @ dearauthor dot com

12 Comments

  1. Ann Somerville
    Sep 17, 2008 @ 22:37:35

    6. Write your own books :)

  2. veinglory
    Sep 17, 2008 @ 22:46:52

    7. Read fan fic etc online
    8. Free out-of-copyright ebooks

    A local 2nd hand book shop works out cheaper than paperback swap most of the time (postage/packaging, fees, deadbeat senders etc).

  3. Ann Somerville
    Sep 17, 2008 @ 22:57:08

    I didn’t really get this tip

    They offer free public domain books to read in their entirety and free samples. Sure, you can get the books elsewhere but it’s a specific place to start, per Emily’s suggestion no.8.

  4. veinglory
    Sep 17, 2008 @ 23:06:25

    I find it odd that they recommend specific site not a general category with many examples (there are at least 3 book swap sites). It always makes me a bit suspicious.

  5. Leah
    Sep 17, 2008 @ 23:07:14

    Paperbackswap is sometimes a little more expensive than I would like it to be, but it’s fun to “shop” there at 2 am! Besides, our used book store has very little variety, and is not that cheap. Also, on Amazon, you can buy used books from individuals/booksellers listed with the new title. Almost every book has a used copy listed. I have sold some books that way, and bought some as well. Aside from a pirated DVD that would not play, I have never been disappointed.

  6. Mireya
    Sep 18, 2008 @ 08:36:33

    I am subscribed to Books Free. I know, I am paying, but considering that I used to spend upwards of $200, paying $21.99 for 6 books-at-a-time is peanuts in comparison. Specially when I gobble about 3-4 books a week and most I don’t consider keepers.

  7. Jane
    Sep 18, 2008 @ 09:28:25

    Emily, the article listed several bookswapping sites.

  8. Nicole
    Sep 18, 2008 @ 10:13:04

    Yeah, more people seem to be buying and selling used books. I know we’re getting a lot more people coming in to work to sell books. People cleaning out their garages and attics hoping to make a few bucks.

    I also use Paperspine to get my paperback fix of titles that I doubt will come in to work frequently.

  9. deputman
    Sep 18, 2008 @ 13:58:30

    What’s been helping me lately, because I don’t like the selection and/or pricing in my local used stores, is to go to Goodwill. I always walk out with several books that I’ve got on my TBB list and since I live in a big city, between the neighborhood I live in and the one I work in, I have four that are fairly conveniently located that I rotate going to.

  10. MaryK
    Sep 18, 2008 @ 16:48:15

    Love library sales – they’re like treasure hunts. You never know what old, cool books people’ve donated from their attics.

  11. Devon
    Sep 21, 2008 @ 07:24:09

    How about good old borrowing from the library?

    –says the disgruntled librarian

  12. Tom Roman
    Oct 03, 2008 @ 12:10:13

    Used books online are getting very cheap due to the economy. As gifts at X-mas, they are great. They could be an old book you wanted to reread again or share with a friend or family member.
    The best thing is, the receiver of a nice old book with meaning to him/her, is a thoughtfull gift and the person assumes you spent a lot more than you did.
    The internet used book trade has made just about every book ever printed available in minutes. You don’t have to go from store to store hoping you may find it.

%d bloggers like this: