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Daily Deals: Two heiresses, a WWII romance, and urban fantasy

A Well Pleasured Lady by Christina Dodd A Well Pleasured Lady by Christina Dodd. $1.99.

From Jacket Copy:

Prim, plain, desperately virtuous Lady Mary Fairchild stared at the seductive gentleman and wondered — did he remember the elements of the night they met? Surely not. In the ten years since, she had abandoned her youthful impetuousness and transformed herself into a housekeeper — disguising her beauty beneath a servant’s dour clothing determined to conquer the passions of the past.

But Sebastian Durant, Viscount Whitfield, did recognize her as a Fairchild, one of his family’s bitter enemies. When he demanded her help recovering a stolen diary, she dared not refuse him. When he proposed they masquerade as a betrothed couple, loyalty forced her to agree. And when the restraint between them shattered and pleasure became an obs+M50ession, Mary had to trust a powerful man who could send her to the gallows … or love her through eternity.

I believe that this has a forced seduction scene in it and some have even deemed it a rape so beware. The Library Journal calls the heroine both an heiress and a murderess.

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His Very Own Girl By: Carrie Lofty His Very Own Girl by Carrie Lofty. $1.99.

From Jacket Copy:

From the author of Flawless and Starlight comes an emotional, sensual romance set during World War II about a female British civilian pilot and the American paratrooper medic who opens her heart–only available as an eBook.

After the War took the lives of Lulu Davies’s parents and her fiancé, she promised herself she would guard her heart carefully and concentrate on her great love–flying the biggest and best airplanes in the sky. Lulu is a pilot in the British civilian air force, ferrying planes around Great Britain and keeping her eye on a coveted spot in a training program for world-class pilots. She’s perfectly content to strive for greatness in the skies, and dance with a few GIs on the way.

Brawny, quiet American medic Joe Weber signed up with the paratroopers to escape his checkered past; he’s hoping that jumping out of planes and patching up soldiers will earn him respect and a hopeful future. Joe’s first real test of medical skill is on a pilot whose plane takes a hard landing in a training field; after rushing to the crash scene, he is stunned to come face-to-face with a gorgeous Rita Hayworth lookalike. And when the two cross paths at a dance hall a couple weeks later, he can’t resist the urge to find out more about this spirited, dark-haired beauty.

Their flirtation breaks all of Lulu’s rules, but dance by dance, week by week, walk by walk, she finds herself falling in love with this honest, vulnerable man on the run from his demons. But as Lulu and Joe’s undeniable attraction gains momentum, World War II steadily intensifies toward D-Day. The lovers only have one night together before Joe is transported to France for the Battle of the Bulge, where his skills and his instinct for survival will be pushed to their limits. Lulu distracts herself with flight school and the friendships of her colleagues, but she can’t get the handsome medic out of her head. Only time and hope will tell if her love will return unharmed from War, and if the two will be able to overcome their pasts to form a beautiful life together in peace-time.

Dabney recommended it for Dear Author. In our not yet published review, she writes “I’ve put off writing this review because I knew if I wrote it right after reading His Very Own Girl, I’d have been on a soapbox, pleading with readers to leave partisan politics behind and work toward a greater good. But, once I calmed down and stopped bawling–His Very Own Girl is a surpassingly affecting novel–I realized I don’t have to beseech anyone to do anything other than read your book. Its context, Britain in 1944 and 1945, and the actions of its lovers, Lulu and Joe, are far more eloquent than any exhortations of mine.

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The Proper Care and Maintenance of Friendship The Proper Care and Maintenance of Friendship by Lisa Verge Higgins. $2.99.

From Jacket Copy:

What makes a wife a lover?
For Kate, the spark went out of her marriage long ago but her husband doesn’t seem to notice. Their role as parents consumes their lives so they need to rekindle the romance they once shared.

What makes a woman a mother?
For Jo, a high-powered career has led her to believe that she doesn’t have a single maternal instinct. When an orphan unexpectedly enters her life, she is forced to confront her own unhappy childhood and the walls it has built around her heart.

What makes a man the love of your life?
For Sarah, home is the steamy jungles of Africa while the man of her dreams waits in the air-conditioned confines of Los Angeles. Her longing for this man from the past is blinding her to a new love standing right in front of her.

What these women all have in common is a friend with a generous soul, an irrepressible spirit- and a serious illness. In her final letters, Rachel raises one last question: What makes a friend live in our hearts forever?

The emotional rediscovery for the three women in the story is spurred by the death of a fourth friend. The reviews have nice things to say but I gleaned that while it is a decent story, it is not profound. A good way to spend your time, if this is the type of book that appeals.

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Blade Song By: J. C. Daniels Blade Song by J. C. Daniels. $2.00.

From Jacket Copy:

Do yourself a favor and read this book. This story is original and hard-hitting with terrific world building and some of the best characters I’ve read. Yum.” Patricia Briggs, author of the #1 NYTimes Mercy Thompson series

Kit Colbana—half breed, assassin, thief, jack of all trades—has a new job: track down the missing ward of one of the local alpha shapeshifters. It should be a piece of cake.

So why is she so nervous? It probably has something to do with the insanity that happens when you deal with shifters—especially sexy ones who come bearing promises of easy jobs and easier money.

Or maybe it’s all the other missing kids that Kit discovers while working the case, or the way her gut keeps screaming she’s gotten in over her head. Or maybe it’s because if she fails—she’s dead.

If she can stay just one step ahead, she should be okay. Maybe she’ll even live long to collect her fee…

J.C. Daniels is a pen name for author Shiloh Walker. This is a self published urban fantasy with a cover quote from Patricia Briggs (who I know does not hand those out unless she has read and liked the book).

You can also buy the book at Smashwords with the coupon code of XX47Z. This deal is only good for today (in celebration of National Buy a Book day).

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Jane Litte is the founder of Dear Author, a lawyer, and a lover of pencil skirts. She spends her downtime reading romances and writing about them. Her TBR pile is much larger than the one shown in the picture and not as pretty. You can reach Jane by email at jane @ dearauthor dot com

25 Comments

  1. Stephanie Scott
    Sep 07, 2012 @ 15:37:18

    A great round up of bargain-priced titles! I’m no good at finding these type of deals so thanks for doing the hard work :)

  2. Dabney
    Sep 07, 2012 @ 16:43:27

    “Their flirtation breaks all of Lulu’s rules, but dance by dance, week by week, walk by walk, she finds herself falling in love with this honest, vulnerable man on the run from his demons. But as Lulu and Joe’s undeniable attraction gains momentum, World War II steadily intensifies toward D-Day. Only time and hope will tell if the two lovers can overcome the past to form a beautiful life together in peace-time.”

    I actually didn’t write that–that’s the publisher’s description. (We’re honest about who writes what here at DearAuthor!) It is a great book, though. Here’s a quote from my review:

    I’ve put off writing this review because I knew if I wrote it right after reading His Very Own Girl, I’d have been on a soapbox, pleading with readers to leave partisan politics behind and work toward a greater good. But, once I calmed down and stopped bawling–His Very Own Girl is a surpassingly affecting novel–I realized I don’t have to beseech anyone to do anything other than read your book. Its context, Britain in 1944 and 1945, and the actions of its lovers, Lulu and Joe, are far more eloquent than any exhortations of mine.

  3. Janine
    Sep 07, 2012 @ 16:54:07

    I really disliked that Dodd book. It’s been many years since I’ve read it, but I recall the rape/forced seduction scene Jane mentions as cold and disturbing, and there was no payoff or justice for it later on in the book.

  4. Jane Litte
    Sep 07, 2012 @ 17:54:38

    @Dabney – oops.

  5. Sandra
    Sep 07, 2012 @ 18:17:01

    @Janine: She told him no. He persisted. She fought him. He persisted. It was rape. His reasoning? She lied to him, so he was free to do as he pleased. I disliked the book so much, I haven’t read Dodd since.

  6. Janine
    Sep 07, 2012 @ 18:48:48

    @Sandra: Me neither. I think it was the second Dodd book I tried, and since the first didn’t work for me either, I stopped there. For me, rape scenes aren’t always a deal breaker, even if it’s the “hero” (antihero) raping the heroine. I love Gaffney’s To Have and to Hold for example. But with that Dodd book, it didn’t work for me at all. And yes, I agree that it was rape — I only called it “rape/forced seduction” because Jane used both terms and I know some readers would see it that way as well.

  7. Rosie
    Sep 07, 2012 @ 18:49:58

    Will be buying the Lofty book at that great price. WWII romances are definite out of the norm for me! Thanks.

  8. Val
    Sep 07, 2012 @ 18:52:50

    I’d love to try the Daniels/Walker book but it keeps coming up $4.99 instead of $2.00. Any idea on if there was a time limit on it today?

  9. Shiloh walker
    Sep 07, 2012 @ 19:02:05

    @val, the price thing/sale was a spur of the minute thing I decided to do today and I can only do those at smash words & ARe.

    But next week, it’s going to be on sale 2.99 at other outlets-I used a distributor this time and aside from ARe & smash words, all the pricing changes/sales come from them & I arrange in advance.

    I’m sorry for any confusion or inconvenience there.

  10. Val
    Sep 07, 2012 @ 19:07:41

    @Shiloh – That’s great and thanks so much for responding. I found it on ARE but FYI, it’s not listed on sale at Smashwords. Off to get me a copy though!

  11. Shiloh walker
    Sep 07, 2012 @ 19:11:49

    @val, for smash words, you just enter the coupon code. :) my phone is being a butt and not letting me copy but it’s at The bottom of Jane’s post.

    I hope you like it.

  12. Val
    Sep 07, 2012 @ 19:16:11

    @Shiloh – Ohhhhh. Yeah, don’t worry about your phone not working because apparently my brain isn’t either. It’s supposed to rain all day tomorrow where I am so I was looking for something to settle in with – thanks for providing it!

  13. Sandra
    Sep 07, 2012 @ 21:50:38

    @Janine: I don’t want to hijack the thread, but I am curious. Where do you draw a line between forced seduction and rape? And what is forced seduction, anyway?

    Seduction, to me, means the heroine consents to the hero’s overtures against her better judgement/her moral compass/society’s mores/whatever. The operative word is consent. She consciously and willing agrees to have sex with the hero.

    In rape there is no consent, even if there is no outward resistance on the part of the heroine. (And there was definite resistance in the Dodd book.) So is forced seduction really forced consent? Resistance is futile? And if it is forced can it really be consensual? Does the fact that he’s the hero make it a forced seduction rather than a rape? Because rape is what the villains do?

  14. Meri
    Sep 08, 2012 @ 04:34:52

    His Very Own Girl, which I’d love to read, is showing up full-priced for me at both Amazon and ARE (these are the only two where I have an account). Did this happen to anyone else? It does seem to be discounted everywhere else.

  15. Rosie
    Sep 08, 2012 @ 07:03:08

    @Meri: The $1.99 price shows up for me on Amazon for the His Very Own Girl.

  16. Meri
    Sep 08, 2012 @ 07:14:54

    @Rosie: Thanks! Maybe it’s a variation on geo-blocking that allows you to get the book but not the discount :(

  17. Kaetrin
    Sep 08, 2012 @ 20:42:47

    @Meri: Yes, Meri, that’s exactly it.

  18. Brian
    Sep 08, 2012 @ 23:45:20

    A WWII story sounds nice, hopefully it’s one of those cases where the cover’s historical accuracy doesn’t reflect the stories accuracy. Horrible cover, at least for WWII history buffs.

  19. Meri
    Sep 09, 2012 @ 00:17:05

    @Kaetrin: Geo-blocking in any form sucks, and I won’t be buying it for 7.99 – now or at any other time.

  20. Dabney
    Sep 09, 2012 @ 11:44:15

    @Brian: Why? What makes it horrible?

  21. Brian
    Sep 09, 2012 @ 19:29:35

    @Dabney:
    Well, the plane in the upper corner was a US fighter flown in the Pacific theater not the European. The only real action it saw in Europe was with the Royal Navy (the pic is of a US plane) as a carrier plane (and even the Royal Navy action was Norway, the Med and the Pacific). Technically seven slightly different night fighter versions from the USN did fly in Europe (out of Corsica) a little bit, but… Pics of WWII aircraft are quite easy to come by and it would have been easy to use a Hurricane (what the heroine is flying at the start of chapter one) or a C-47 (what most US para jumps were made from) both types are mentioned in the books sample so it’s not like it would have taken much work to know what to look for.

    Also she is shown holding an mans RAF (Royal Air Force) uniform hat (and it’s pretty prominent), but the hero was US Army, not RAF. According to the books description she is a civilian pilot, not WAAF (and even if she was it’s not a woman’s hat) and it’s certainly nothing to do with a US paratrooper. [the hero should probably be wearing a uniform instead of a civilian suit, but that didn't stand out as a 'problem' or anything]

    Overly picky? Probably. Stupid? Maybe. Most people wouldn’t notice and probably couldn’t care less, but it’s like having a women in a ‘prom dress’ on the cover of a historical for me. It just bugs me a bit. Like I said hopefully the stories accuracy is fine (I’m sure it probably is), it’s just that covers like this bug me sometimes (maybe this one caught me on a bad day), like when they use modern equipment in period movies (really takes me out of the story). I’ll have to read your review and see what you thought of the story.

  22. Dabney
    Sep 09, 2012 @ 20:18:06

    @Brian: She’s in the ATA and had a uniform. Don’t know if it mimicked that of the RAF. He is out of uniform a few times in the novel. The book itself seemed really well researched to me, but I’m not a WWII expert!

  23. Poppy
    Sep 10, 2012 @ 13:04:53

    Hi Brian,

    http://www.poetryinaction-aviation.com/airtransportauxiliary/id6.html

    The site here has some great stories and information about the ATA, including pictures of the uniforms. As can be seen they were actually pretty damn accurate with her uniform considering!

    http://www.rotor.com/membership/rotor/rotorpdf/winter04_05/46.pdf

    Also, at the link above there’s an interview with Nancy Stratford, a member of the ATA during the war, where she talks about the aircraft she flew during the war (including Hellcats). Lend-Lease planes from the US came over in US colors and one of the ATA’s jobs would have likely been to ferry these planes to locations where they would be repainted.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_Transport_Auxiliary

    The ATA as a female-centric ‘civilian’ organization was criminally under-recognized after the war and I think that the fact that we’re having this conversation is proof of it! Hopefully this book will go someway towards rectifying this.

  24. Dabney
    Sep 10, 2012 @ 15:05:40

    @Poppy: @Brian: The review goes up tomorrow and I hope I got the history right!

    I was really struck by the depth of historical context in this book, so I’m not surprised to hear the cover is valid. I loved learning about the ATA and the other opportunities for women WWII offered that were then taken away.

  25. Brian
    Sep 11, 2012 @ 08:52:40

    @Poppy:
    But that’s just it, she’s not wearing a uniform on the cover and she’s holding a mans RAF uniform hat. I know what ATA and WAAF uniforms looked like and womens hats were different (and why would she be holding her hat while in civilian dress, seems screwy).

    Yes, the UK got Hellcats as a part of lend lease (about 200 in ’43 and 900-1,000 more in ’44-’45 IIRC) so it’s not totally out of the realm as you say (they were used in the Med and the South Pacific so I guess I didn’t think about them going through the UK first), but it’s still IMO a bad choice when there are other aircraft (that were used in the many thousands) that would have been a better choice. Unless maybe the Hellcat was prominate in the book???

    The ATA as a female-centric ‘civilian’ organization was criminally under-recognized after the war and I think that the fact that we’re having this conversation is proof of it! Hopefully this book will go someway towards rectifying this

    Not sure what this is supposed to mean. I’m quite familiar with what the ATA did and what women in the WAAF (and the WASP’s in the US for that matter) did and also how unrecognised most of them went until recent years. I’ve read numerous books and articles on the subject of women in WWII and met a few WASP pilots (being from the US) myself.

    Like I said, those were just things about the cover that struck me wrong at first glance. Doesn’t make the cover invalid, just struck me as horrible design choices. I design among other things covers (for a totally different segment of publishing) and they just struck me as wrong. Shrug. Probably doesn’t make sense and sounds stupid, not even saying I’m “right” it was just my reaction on seeing it, which is what a cover is all about.

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