Romance, Historical, Contemporary, Paranormal, Young Adult, Book reviews, industry news, and commentary from a reader's point of view

REVIEW: Posh Doc Claims His Bride by Anne Fraser

Dear Ms. Fraser,

posh-docJane stated her intention of stretching her Harlequin boundaries so I decided I could yank mine a little more as well. Jane loves the “Presents” line but asshole Mediterranean heroes crossed with blonde doormat heroines just isn’t my thing. When I saw your book listed in the “Medical” line, I thought I could give this kind of story an attempt without all the features I can’t stand. And the wonderful title “Posh Doc Claims His Bride,” sealed the deal.

When she accepted the locum position as a GP on a remote Scottish island, Meagan Galbraith didn’t expect to meet the man she thought dumped her after their magical meeting seven years ago. But there he is, Dr. Cameron Stuart, still as sexy and heart stopping as he was back then. Though she tries, somehow! she just can’t resist him or not respond to him!

Cameron always meant to contact Meagan but fate forced his hand – in marriage – with a woman he knew he didn’t love. As the only two doctors on Uist, they’ll be working closely together. Can they find a way to a HEA after all this time and heartache?

Wow, who said being a GP on a small, remote Scottish island would be a walk in the park? Whoever did, lied to Meagan because you make this woman earn her respect from the islanders the hard way. An emergency c-section, an emergency flood rescue, an emergency helicopter ride to a swamped fishing boat then keeping it from going under for two hours followed an emergency appendectomy in addition to the general humdrum every day stuff doesn’t sound like an uneventful month long locum job to me. I shudder to think what medical care was like before air rescue could swoop in and save the day.

When you gave Meagan’s age as 19 and stated that she was just finishing medical school, I stopped and said, “whoa.” 19? Then I checked with an English friend of mine and asked do UK medical students really start that young? Unless Meagan is some kind of female Doogie Howser, I have to doubt that she could finish med school by 19 and have done her training and two years service with Doctors Without Borders by the time she’s 26. Really, really doubt it.

One of the strong points of the book is the setting. And it’s beyond obvious that you’ve spent a lot of time in a similar one and know the people and place well. The residents here seem like down to earth, hard working, fun people. Even though Meagan didn’t enjoy their cheerful grandstand view of her arrival, slip sliding through the mud, I laughed as they called out advice to Cameron as he plucked her from the peat. And I would adore some of the scones that seem to litter every table for miles.

I also like the fact that the book was published in the US complete with the British English spellings – oedema, paediatrician, foetal, etc. I hate it when spellings get “Americanized” and the feel of the book is changed by eliminating Britishisms. If the setting of the book is somewhere in the UK, then by God make the book sound like it. Points for Harlequin here.

The reservations that Cameron has about Meagan make sense beyond the usual plot line that calls for the hero to doubt the heroine. Meagan is young and hasn’t as much experience as a GP (primary/family medical doctor for us in the US) as he does. But at times his second guessing her got on my nerves. After she managed to deliver the baby and not lose the mother, I would have felt like smacking him when he initially insisted on performing the appendectomy, especially considering who the patient was.

I just don’t get that Cameron’s ex-wife Rachel would have so easily gotten custody of Ian. Maybe years ago but Cameron is the one who is closest to home while she’s about to start on what will probably be a jet set modeling career. Plus he can offer the stability of long term roots in the community. Cameron needed to have got hold of a good solicitor.

There’s a kind of soap opera feel at end. Meagan does stand up to Cameron a little but then it starts to feel like she’s tipping towards martyrdom. And she gives in to his proposal after only one night of thought. Yeah, she’s still in love with him and he with her but must the ending and dash for marriage be this quick? “No, we must wait, I must have time. Ooh, enough time passed after 10 hours, I’ll give in and say ‘yes’ since you’re going to keep bugging me until I do.” I wasn’t fond of the miracle pregnancy either.

While I don’t think I’m going to follow Jane into her love of this style novel, at least this one has a Scottish laird/doctor instead of a Greek/Italian/Spanish tycoon. And estate/death taxes have taken a chunk from the family moolah. It was a treat to read a book so grounded in “place” instead of one with only a lite coating of its setting. B- for “Posh Doc Claims His Bride.”

~Jayne

Another long time reader who read romance novels in her teens, then took a long break before started back again about 15 years ago. She enjoys historical romance/fiction best, likes contemporaries, action- adventure and mysteries, will read suspense if there's no TSTL characters and is currently reading very few paranormals.

46 Comments

  1. JJ
    Mar 03, 2009 @ 16:31:32

    Just a small note about medical school in the UK: I believe you can read for medicine as an undergraduate, therefore you leave uni with a medical degree, either a Bachelor of Medicine or a Bachelor of Surgery. (But I’m not sure if this allows for clinical practice.) In the US and Canada, medicine is a postgraduate degree but I know that’s not necessarily the case over there. A little Wikipedia digging showed me that after leaving uni you train for two years before attaining accreditation. In theory I suppose Megan could have done it all by 26…if she started young? University is 3 years for undergraduate degrees, and if she went directly to school without taking a gap year (and was on the youngish side), she could have left at 19. (I myself graduated from college at 20.)

  2. Janicu
    Mar 03, 2009 @ 16:48:28

    Wait. I’m so confused. So she’s 19, but he dumped her 7 years ago? What, when she was 12?!?! Or he dumped her when she was 19?

  3. Jayne
    Mar 03, 2009 @ 17:29:25

    Sorry. They first met when she was 19 and he dumped her. Now it’s 7 years later and she’s 26.

  4. Jayne
    Mar 03, 2009 @ 17:33:49

    Wow. 19 years old. That just blows my mind. And my friend was very, very sure that this wasn’t possible. I stand corrected then. Thanks for the information, JJ.

  5. Coco
    Mar 03, 2009 @ 17:38:19

    “Posh Doc Claims His Bride”??? How Stupid do they think their readership is that we can’t infer his social status from his occupation? Even if we couldn’t why do they have to use a colloquial term?

    Although I suppose we might have thought “Doc Claims His Bride” was a rags to riches tale for the male protagonist. Goodness knows that thinking that for even a second would be disastrous.

    JJ : I hope you don’t mind me adding my two cents (or pennies :p ) but the MBBS (or MBChB as some less dinosaur like Universities are calling it now) is 5 year course that cannot be gained in three years no matter how academically brilliant you are.

    You can leave at the three year mark and gain a BSc instead but that will not allow you to practice medicine. You can however then enter a medical programme for graduates which is a four year course. But then you will always have to do a year of house jobbing before you can practice as a doctor. This is all before the training to become a GP in the first place. So all in all if she started say at 16, then had 5 years of med school, 1 year of training (which they are now extending to two), 2 years with doctors without borders, then an extra 2 years to become a GP (I don’t even know if this includes Royal Society Fellowship and is possible) then she could be where she is at the age of 26. However she could NOT have finished medical school at 19.

    Also wow- I didn’t realise that GP’s could perform appendicectomies.

    coco

  6. Jayne
    Mar 03, 2009 @ 17:46:24

    Wait. So I wasn’t wrong? ::clutching head::

    She got her surgical “training” while out in the bush with Doctors without Borders. Or so she says.

    I kind of like the title since the word “Posh” sounds so British to me. And though he’s got the family house and is a Laird, apparently there isn’t too much money lying around.

  7. Laura Vivanco
    Mar 03, 2009 @ 17:50:35

    Yes, the medics start as undergraduates. In the Scottish system you can go to university at 17, and there were some first-year medics who were 17 at my (Scottish) university. I think they do three years of study based mostly within a university, and then go on to do 2 years, mostly made up of placements, working in hospitals (though these 2 years still count as part of the undergraduate degree). Here’s Dundee University’s description of their undergraduate medical degree. Manchester’s is also 5 years (I checked a Scottish university and an English one because the university systems are different in some respects), but “From Year 3 onwards students are assigned to one of four major teaching hospitals.”

    So yes, if she started young, I suppose by 19 she could have getting towards the end of the main part of university-based training.

    According to the Royal College of General Practitioners, after the 5 years are completed “Doctors then enter a two-year Foundation Programme which forms a bridge between medical school and specialist or general practice training, and provides trainee doctors with a grounding in practical medicine and core clinical skills.”

    Médecins Sans Frontières require medical doctors to have “Proven professional experience after registration (e.g 2 years experience at SHO level minimum) OR with the introduction of the Foundation Programme in August 2005, medical doctors completing this training will be required to have successfully completed F2 plus at least 1 year post F2 professional experience.” There’s an explanation of some of those terms here.

    So, she could have finished the university part of her training by 19 and then the 2 more clinical years to finish her undergraduate degree. That might take her to about age 21. Then she’d have done her training (F1 + F2), one extra year post-F2 professional experience, which would take her to age 24, and two years with MSF would take her to 26.

    After a bit more Googling, I came up with the (admittedly exceptional case) of the UK’s youngest doctor. In July 2008 she was just 22:

    Britain’s youngest doctor is preparing to test out her bedside manner at the tender age of just 22.

    Heenal Raichura was the youngest ever would-be doctor at 16-year-old when she was accepted into university to study medicine in 2002.

    Six years later she has passed her degree with flying colours and been snapped up to work at University College London Hospital where she hopes to become a surgeon.

  8. Jayne
    Mar 03, 2009 @ 17:59:07

    Oy, my head is spinning now. Well, if nothing else, I’ve certainly learned a lot about medical education in the UK. Thanks all!

  9. Coco
    Mar 03, 2009 @ 18:12:47

    Jayne: As a British almost medical student I don’t think you were wrong. Medicine is a compulsory 6 year (to qualification) undergraduate course. This is not including the year in between you may take out to get an extra BSc.

    However heavy emphasis on the almost.

    I’m also pretty sure that Docs without Borders requires at least (if not much more) an F2 level doctor as you have to be registered with the General medical Council as being able to practice, which only happens after you have completed your F1 post degree training for approx a year.

    I think I dislike the use of posh in the title because I would only call someone that in a negative sense. Although I can understand why you like it, I would have preferred something like Aristocratic Doc if he’s a Laird, in keeping with the awfully-wonderful “asshole” filthy rich heroes of the Presents line.

    What about: Hot Doctoring Laird Claims His British Female Doogie Howser Bride.

    Maybe not.

    Coco

    Just incase you wanted extra info on medical training in the UK here is the bma “I want to be a doctor” pdf

  10. Coco
    Mar 03, 2009 @ 18:22:59

    @ Laura Vivanco:

    Sorry Laura, don’t know why I didn’t see your post! Dr Heenal Raichura sounds like a great heroine model for a Presents line. Just the racial diversity would make it interesting!

  11. Laura Vivanco
    Mar 03, 2009 @ 18:45:37

    “Just the racial diversity would make it interesting!

    Yes, and it would also perhaps make the line (taken as a whole) a bit more accurate, given that according to an article “based on the William Pickles Lecture delivered on 10 April 2005,” “Current estimates suggest that almost one-third of doctors practising in the NHS are from overseas and that the vast majority of these overseas doctors are from the Indian subcontinent.”

    And as far as I can tell, that figure doesn’t include the doctors who were born in the UK but belong to ethnic minority groups.

  12. Jayne
    Mar 03, 2009 @ 18:54:14

    What about: Hot Doctoring Laird Claims His British Female Doogie Howser Bride.

    Woot! Given how convoluted some of the titles in this line are, that’s pretty accurate. There’s one called “The Children’s Doctor’s Special Proposal.” Why not just use the term pediatrician/paediatrician? Is there a parent who doesn’t know what a doctor specializing in children’s care is called?

  13. Laura Vivanco
    Mar 03, 2009 @ 19:13:24

    Why not just use the term pediatrician/paediatrician? Is there a parent who doesn't know what a doctor specializing in children's care is called?

    Well, yes, there might well be, because in the UK we tend to see GPs unless there’s something very specifically wrong, health-wise. So for routine check-ups and illnesses most parents will take their children to see their GP. And yes, there are paediatricians, but as far as I know they tend to be based in hospitals and some parents might not be aware that’s what the technical name is. They might just think of that person as “Doctor X at Children’s Hospital Y.”

  14. Jayne
    Mar 03, 2009 @ 20:01:53

    Ah-ha. See, something else learned. I’m afraid Family Medicine doctors are a dying breed here. Not enough money.

  15. Areader
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 02:01:01

    I just don't get that Cameron's ex-wife Rachel would have so easily gotten custody of Ian.

    There is a pressure group over here called fathers 4 justice that would argue otherwise.

  16. Laura Vivanco
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 04:13:29

    Jayne, if you’re interested in yet more information about the UK system, the pay scales for NHS doctors are given here.

    To me, that looks like extremely good pay (for comparative purposes here are the 2007 averages for various academic jobs and the National Minimum Wage is “£5.73 per hour for workers aged 22 years and older” and according to the Working Time Regulations “a limit of an average of 48 hours a week which a worker can be required to work (though workers can choose to work more if they want to)”), which works out at £14,302.08 (I assumed a 52-week year, and the regulations guarantee full-time staff “a right to 4 weeks paid leave per year”).

    I suppose it’s a bit complicated to translate that into dollars, because you have to take into account differences in the tax systems, and the fact that in the UK there isn’t a need to have separate health insurance (although a small proportion of people do “go private”). I also have the impression that tuition fees at university are much lower in the UK (see details here, though there was a time, not so long ago, when we got paid grants to go to university, rather than having to pay to go).

  17. Jayne
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 04:42:31

    Hmmm, I just keep thinking that throwing his Lairdness around, along with the services of a good lawyer, would at least even the field for him. But…more things being learned about UK society by me.

  18. Anne Fraser
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 04:47:54

    Hi Jayne

    Thanks for taking the time to read and review my book. And thanks to everyone for the posts.

    Mmm- timings. You are all quite right. It is extremely unlikely Meagan would have completed her degree at 19. My husband- who is a doctor- and usually keeps me right with the finer details, went to medical school when he was 16. He was unusually young though because he was pushed up a year when he was in primary school- being particularly bright. He would have finished his degree at 21 except he did a two year BSc in the middle. Then there was two years of house jobs and a year of General practice training. Actually he didn’t follow this path. He started his specialist training in obstetrics and gynaecology, then left and did his GP training, after which we travelled. Firstly to rural Africa where my second book Her Very Special Boss is set, then to Australia and finally Canada. He is now a consultant in Obs and Gyn.

    But Meagan could well have trained as a GP, spent time with Medecin Sans Frontieres and still been 26. Note to self- double check dates in future!

    I’m glad you liked the setting. I love the Western Isles where my parents were born and extended family still live. The islands really are different to anywhere else in Scotland. The rural location does mean that GPs have to do all sort of stuff that they would never have to in the cities. The locals rely on the air ambulance service, but often, in the winter especially, the plane can’t land or take off. (And yes Jayne, before the Air Ambulance Service, emergencies often had tragic outcomes.)

    And as far as scones, it is part of local tradition, that visitors have to be offered a wee ‘strupak’ which usually means a mound of food (definitely homebaking included) on a plate. I can’t tell you how many times I have had to force several plates of food down in the space of a few hours when visiting relatives!

    Lastly, thanks for confirming what most of us medical authors believe- that the medical terminology used in the UK is perfectly understandable by our US readers. I really hope you’ll give the medicals another go sometime, there really are some fantastic authors in the line who deserve a wider audience.

    Lovely ‘chatting’ with you.

    ps. Posh Doc Claims His Bride is my third book, but the first available in the US, so all of this is still pretty new to me.

  19. Jayne
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 05:32:08

    So the way I read the tuition fees article, £3,225 would buy you a years tuition at any university in England, Wales or Northern Ireland? Not bad. And how does tuition work in Scotland?

  20. Jayne
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 06:03:20

    Pardon my further ignorance but what is a BSc? I get the idea it’s an advanced or specialized degree. Is it like a Fellowship, ie being trained in high risk OB/Gyn vs everyday OB/Gyn cases?

  21. Jayne
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 06:27:50

    after which we travelled. Firstly to rural Africa where my second book Her Very Special Boss is set, then to Australia and finally Canada. He is now a consultant in Obs and Gyn.

    Oh, wow. That’s so cool. Traveling like that is something I wish more Americans would do/have the chance to do.

    I'm glad you liked the setting. I love the Western Isles where my parents were born and extended family still live. The islands really are different to anywhere else in Scotland. The rural location does mean that GPs have to do all sort of stuff that they would never have to in the cities. The locals rely on the air ambulance service, but often, in the winter especially, the plane can't land or take off. (And yes Jayne, before the Air Ambulance Service, emergencies often had tragic outcomes.)

    I am spoiled by having two University, Level 1 trauma hospitals within a 20 minute drive of my house. Both have Lifeflight helicopters, one of which I often see heading off or coming back with a patient. I also routinely see ambulances from counties all over the state on the interstate highways leading into my area. A friend of mine, who works in health care, goes on a mission to Central America every year and says it brings her crashing back to the reality of how the majority of the world gets its health care. Another friend works in a mobile clinic that operates in some of the poorer counties of my own state. It’s staggering to hear how little access even they have to daily medical care.

    And as far as scones, it is part of local tradition, that visitors have to be offered a wee 'strupak' which usually means a mound of food (definitely homebaking included) on a plate. I can't tell you how many times I have had to force several plates of food down in the space of a few hours when visiting relatives!

    So do you start off, as Cameron advised Meagan, with an empty stomach? ;) I’ve tried baking scones from scratch but they never seem to equal what I’ve eaten in restaurants and B&Bs.

    Lastly, thanks for confirming what most of us medical authors believe- that the medical terminology used in the UK is perfectly understandable by our US readers. I really hope you'll give the medicals another go sometime, there really are some fantastic authors in the line who deserve a wider audience.

    I can’t tell you how much it annoys me to read a book which is supposed to be set in the UK only to realize that it’s been, IMO, watered down for American consumption. It changes the whole feel of it. I mean, it’s like going abroad and eating nothing but McDonalds. Gah! Taste the local food. Live a little, my fellow Americans. Enjoy the flavor of a different country even if it’s only in word spellings.

    Sigh, I’ll stop ranting now.

  22. Treva Harte
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 06:46:39

    Spice Doc Returns His Bride — oh sorry. Mind wandered after reading the title.

  23. Laura Vivanco
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 07:17:13

    And how does tuition work in Scotland?

    Since I graduated a while ago, and don’t have a job at a university, I’ve not been keeping up with the details but as far as I can tell, “If you are classed as being ordinarily resident in Scotland or another European Union (EU) country outside the UK, and are going to be studying full-time in Scotland, you will not be required to pay tuition fees.” (via Stirling University). As you can see from the page I’ve linked to, that means that English, Welsh and Northern Irish students studying at Scottish universities do have to pay tuition fees.

    There was a “graduate endowment fee” (described here) but that’s now been abolished. There are more details about it here, as well as an overview of the student loans situation (which students apply for via the Student Awards Agency for Scotland). The idea is that these are low-interest loans which don’t have to be paid back until the graduate is earning above a relatively low wage- not much above the amount I gave above as being the yearly figure on a minimum wage.

    Getting funding for postgraduate study is more competitive, since there are limited places, but “The UK Research Councils, the British Academy and the Student Awards Agency for Scotland offer both one-year and three-year awards which can cover tuition fees and maintenance for UK students” (via Stirling University). Postgraduates here don’t do nearly as much teaching as I think postgrads do in the US. I did almost none at all, for example, though it’s a good idea to get teaching experience. Lecturers tend to teach undergraduate lectures and often give seminars, so there aren’t so many classes that post-grads could teach, apart from seminars (i.e. going over areas in more detail with a small number of students) or practicals/language-teaching classes. Durham University’s got a short description of the courses would-be postgraduate teaching assistants have to go on and that describes the kind of teaching they’d be expected to do.

  24. Coco
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 07:18:27

    Anne Fraser: The islands really are different to anywhere else in Scotland. The rural location does mean that GPs have to do all sort of stuff that they would never have to in the cities. The locals rely on the air ambulance service, but often, in the winter especially, the plane can't land or take off. (And yes Jayne, before the Air Ambulance Service, emergencies often had tragic outcomes.)

    That is actually really interesting to know Ms Fraser, where I am the GPs have absolutely no power to do anything but remove minor skin tag/moles surgery-wise.
    I suppose Island GPs would have to do extra training in different fields like OBs/Gyn, Surgery etc.? It would also perhaps make sense that Cameron didn’t allow meagan to do the appendectomy as perhaps she was still learning that side of things?

    Also totally off topic but wouldn’t your husband qualify as the youngest doctor in the UK?!

    @Jayne: A BSc is a bachelor of science degree completed by undergraduates. It is usually a three years like most other bachelor degree but can be four if there is a research year/ idustrial placement year. So you can have a BSc in Biochemistry but also if an economics degree has a lot of mathematical theory/research in it that too can be a BSc (instead of a BA.) Medical students can spend an extra year doing an intercalated degree that will gain them an extra qualification on top of the MBBS/MBChB.

    Coco

  25. Sunita
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 09:10:42

    Oooh, this sounds great! I have a weakness for M&B’s Medical line and I’m so glad they’ve finally started releasing them over here as ebooks. And the setting sounds terrific.

    The heroine’s age is stretching it a bit, but it’s not impossible, as you’ve pointed out. It’s hard to fathom when you’re used to the US system, but Indian medical training is on the English model, and the doctors can start at a much younger age.

  26. karmelrio
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 09:35:57

    Spice Doc Returns His Bride -‘ oh sorry. Mind wandered after reading the title.

    Our minds apparently run on parallel (Spice Girl) paths, Treva. The title brings to mind an immediate flash of Posh Spice – aka Victoria Beckham.

  27. Anne Fraser
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 09:54:48

    Hi Sunita That’s interesting. How do you get your downloads?

    As far as Ethnic diversity in the hero and heroine, my fifth book The Doctors Suprise Proposal has an Indian hero and the one I am currently working on, as yet untitled has a herione who is half Xhosa.

    I posted a reply about the BSc, but it seems to have disappeared into thin air. What did I do wrong?

  28. Jayne
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 10:02:34

    I have to say that on the islands the doctors would try everything in their power to get surgical cases to a hospital where the relevant specialist would operate. But, yes, in emergencies they would have to cope the best they can. There is a hospital such as the one I described which is equipped for such emergencies and yes, Cameron would be reluctant for Meagan to do the operation because of her lack of experience- but neither could he operate on his own child.

    A BSc is exactly as Coco says. My husband did a two year BSc which meant he was 23 when he qualified- so no chance of being the youngest doctor in the UK although in theory I suppose he might have been!

    I have a question. How do you decide which books to review?

    Anne, did you click on my name when you were replying? Because the above got forwarded to me as an email.

  29. Jayne
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 10:13:10

    Oooh, this sounds great! I have a weakness for M&B's Medical line and I'm so glad they've finally started releasing them over here as ebooks. And the setting sounds terrific.

    I think this is a fairly new offering from eharlequin. From this past December based on the release dates. Some of the other titles such as “English Doctor, Italian Bride” and “The GP’s Meant to Be Bride” make me think this is “Presents: Medical-Style.”

    The heroine's age is stretching it a bit, but it's not impossible, as you've pointed out. It's hard to fathom when you're used to the US system, but Indian medical training is on the English model, and the doctors can start at a much younger age.

    Yeah, I don’t mean to offend anyone but I’m still wrapping my brain around 17 year olds already in medical training. Remembering the frat parties of my youth makes me wary of any of them learning on/practicing on me. But if someone knows what they want to do, might as well get on with it and not spend a year or mores tuition taking arts courses they’ll never use. On the other hand, wouldn’t that detract from a well rounded education?

  30. Jayne
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 10:20:02

    I have a question. How do you decide which books to review?

    Anne it’s entirely up to each reviewer here to select which books she wants to read. We get offers of books from authors plus publicists from the publishing houses will send us arcs and finished copies but we’re not assigned to review anything. And then there are the large to-be-read collections most of us have gathered over the years plus new books which we purchase ourselves.

  31. Sunita
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 10:21:57

    Hi Sunita That's interesting. How do you get your downloads?

    I always check the Mills and Boon website since the release dates vary between the US and the UK. Especially for the Medicals, there are a lot more ebooks available there. The other good source is WH Smith’s ebookshop, which has all the M&Bs that are available in ebook form and offers 25% off. My bank doesn’t charge much for international transactions and the exchange rate is much more favorable now, so it’s no more expensive than shopping at the US site.

    But everything that’s been released since January 2009 is available at the US Harlequin ebookstore, and I’m hoping they’ll add to the Medicals from the backlist.

    As far as Ethnic diversity in the hero and heroine, my fifth book The Doctors Suprise Proposal has an Indian hero and the one I am currently working on, as yet untitled has a herione who is half Xhosa.

    Oh excellent, I am so there!

  32. Jayne
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 10:30:14

    The other good source is WH Smith's ebookshop, which has all the M&Bs that are available in ebook form and offers 25% off. My bank doesn't charge much for international transactions and the exchange rate is much more favorable now, so it's no more expensive than shopping at the US site.

    Oooh, that is so nice to know. 25% off? I love that like I love my kitty! And I ♥ that the exchange rate doesn’t require that I take out a new mortgage on my house to purchase books from the UK anymore.

  33. Sunita
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 10:39:41

    Oooh, that is so nice to know. 25% off? I love that like I love my kitty! And I ♥ that the exchange rate doesn't require that I take out a new mortage on my house to purchase books from the UK anymore.

    True dat. When WHS first opened its ebookstore, everything was 50% off. Jane posted about it, but it was over the holidays and people might have missed it. I, however, did not, and went *crazy* buying books. I was afraid that the 25% off was also temporary, but it’s been going for a while, so maybe they’re going to keep it indefinitely.

    What I love about shopping there is that I can buy the original editions by British authors and retain the spellings, etc. I can’t believe that they Americanize the text when they do the US editions (and it’s not just M&B, they do it with mysteries and lit fic too). So annoying! As you said, it’s not as if we can’t figure out the words. Also, they have ePub editions of a lot of books, which I find are much better formatted for the Sony Reader than Adobe. The Adobes are sometimes fine, but sometimes the print is way too small to read easily, and then you have to enlarge the font size and lose the page formatting.

    Also, because the release dates vary, there are M&B ebooks that Harlequin doesn’t have (and vice versa). For example, a number of the Jessica Bird books are available there but not here, and Ellen Hartman’s first book (which is excellent, BTW) is available at M&B.

  34. Laura Vivanco
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 11:30:57

    As far as Ethnic diversity in the hero and heroine, my fifth book The Doctors Suprise Proposal has an Indian hero and the one I am currently working on, as yet untitled has a herione who is half Xhosa.

    I’ll be looking for them! But would I be right in thinking that the fifth book isn’t out till quite a lot later this year? Amazon.co.uk seems to have it listed as coming out as a hardback called The Playboy Doctor’s Surprise Proposal, and it’s not out till July 2009, so I imagine it’ll be even longer till it’s out in paperback/as an ebook.

    But if someone knows what they want to do, might as well get on with it and not spend a year or mores tuition taking arts courses they'll never use. On the other hand, wouldn't that detract from a well rounded education?

    People start specialising much earlier in the UK. Those students will already have narrowed down their subjects at A level (in England, Wales and Northern Ireland) to 3 or 4. In Scotland we specialise a bit later, because we take more Highers (we did 5 or 6 at my school), and then there’s the option of specialising a bit more at Advanced Higher level (formerly Sixth Year Studies level, and we did about 3 of those).

    In the Scottish university system an undergraduate degree usually lasts 4 years, whereas at English universities it usually takes 3 (although as discussed above, medicine’s a bit different). We do specialise much sooner than in the US system, but there are advantages to it:

    Specialization by the age of 16 is pretty unheard of in the US where many students choose a major area of study only after the second of four years of university study. The first two years often consist of a large fraction of “general education” courses as schools strive to impart a well-rounded educational experience. For example, a statistics major will also take university courses in areas including English, history, and science. Educators often argue that students cannot decide by age 18 or 20 what they want to do and need to be exposed to many different ideas and ways of thinking. Having students focus earlier as in the UK allows for more tailoring of content and stronger coordination among courses. Usually the whole class is made up of one major all in the same year. A student can spend every day for three years with the same people in every class, and students can have the same teacher for several years. This also appears to allow students to delve into their chosen discipline more deeply before leaving the university. Teachers spend more time with the same students but can end up teaching many different courses simultaneously, where in the US they will often have more similarity in the courses they teach but a larger number of different students (Chance and Mortlock 2003)

    They also write that

    In the US, degrees are typically conferred after successful completion of a set list of courses usually over four years, whereas most British degrees are based on cumulative exams at the end of 3 years. The UK approach appears to require more long-term memory, and thus deeper understanding of the subject matter, whereas students in the US can have trouble linking ideas between classes. US students often feel they succeed by regurgitating more than integrating or applying their knowledge. On the plus side, this can be less stressful for students and may benefit them through the additional variety of topics.

    But my experience, because my university had shifted to teaching in modules, was that the examinations were spread over the 4 years, so it wasn’t so stressful.

    Another consequence of the specialisation is that I have a feeling we finish our PhDs younger. If someone who’s 18 goes to an English university, he or she can finish her/his undergraduate by the age of 20, and then finish a PhD by the age of 23. Because we’ve already specialised, many of us can start a PhD and not have to take very many (if any) taught courses. So here a PhD can involve 3 years of supervised study and writing with almost no taught component and the only examination being the “viva” at the end.

  35. coco
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 12:05:20

    I ♥ that the exchange rate doesn't require that I take out a new mortgage on my house to purchase books from the UK anymore.

    It’s great that the American economy is doing well but… *Le Sigh*… I had just discovered fictionwise and gone on a manic half-priced e-book spending spree only to realise in the second week that the half-priced books were now as non-existent as my bank balance! :(

    Does anyone know if WHS ebooks have an app on the itouch?

    Also woot at the multi-racial storylines ahoy!

    coco

  36. Sunita
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 13:31:32

    It's great that the American economy is doing well but… *Le Sigh*… I had just discovered fictionwise and gone on a manic half-priced e-book spending spree only to realise in the second week that the half-priced books were now as non-existent as my bank balance! :(

    Does anyone know if WHS ebooks have an app on the itouch?

    My condolences; we have so many more options here that it seems unfair that we get the exchange rate as well. But if we have the benefit, I’m using it!

    Unfortunately WHS does not have the ereader format, as far as I can tell. It has the .lit format, which is supposed to be fairly easy to strip the DRM from, but I haven’t done it so I can’t confirm. If Stanza ever gets around to supporting mobi or .lit, then you’ll have access. Sorry.

  37. Jayne
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 13:49:50

    Coco, I asked Jane your question and here is her reply. I hope it makes more sense to you than it does to me!

    No they don’t, but Stanza reads epub docs.

  38. Sunita
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 14:06:45

    Ignore my previous answer if Stanza reads ePubs! WHS has a lot of ePubs; the older M&B and other books may not have them, but the more recently released ones definitely do. It all depends on the publisher.

  39. Jane
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 15:06:46

    @Sunita Just to be clear, I looked it up online and Stanza reads only DRM free epubs. There is a Python based DRM remover for epubs and depending on the country in which you live and your technical skills, you could remove the DRM from the Adobe ePubs and move the “freed” copy to your iTouch without breaking the law. In the US, stripping the DRM is prohibited by the DMCA. I admit to being a “stripper” of DRM because I want the ability to buy the books I want, from the stores I want, and read the books on the device that I want and I believe that the DMCA is unconstitutional. However, not everyone may feel this way. //end caveat.

  40. Sunita
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 17:16:03

    @Jane: Oh well. It seems that if you’re going to go down the DRM-stripping route, .lit is the way to go, since from what I can gather the end product seems the most reliable. But I appear to be congenitally unable to learn python so I can only theorize.

  41. coco
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 17:21:36

    Sunita:My condolences; we have so many more options here that it seems unfair that we get the exchange rate as well. But if we have the benefit, I'm using it!

    It is TOTALLY unfair! Lol. The one and only bookshop in the country dedicated to and with a GREAT selection of romance novels shut down last month. This was partially due to the exchange rate, it wasn’t feasible for them to import books anymore- not that i’m not really pleased you guys are getting back on your feet since our economy is tied to yours! I suppose we have Borders…

    Libraries, although selection is getting a little better as publishing houses like Piatkus publish more american romances/ urban fantasy, have only the uber popular authors like Julia Quinn, some Jayne Anne Krentz and Kresley Cole- for whose books I totally did a happy dance right in front of the WHOLE library. Is one romance UBS too much to ask for???

    OK rant over, sorry and, erm, thanks :)

    @Jayne and Jane Thank you for explaining! I must admit although I lurrveee the ebook reading facilities on my itouch, I do not understand the whole DRM situation yet. I must make some time to savvy up on it.

    Woot 25% off, here I come!

  42. Jane
    Mar 04, 2009 @ 19:33:48

    @Sunita Well, if you can install a program and follow some step by step instructions, it’s not that hard. I mean, you don’t have to know “python” in order to get it to work. I like the epub stripping program because it preserves the original epub format and it saves a step in the process. I.e., no conversion then.

  43. Anne Fraser
    Mar 05, 2009 @ 07:20:39

    Hi Laura

    The Playboy Doctor’s Surprise Proposal is out in paperback in August I think. If you do read it, I’d love to know what you think.

  44. Laura Vivanco
    Mar 05, 2009 @ 16:00:51

    If you do read it, I'd love to know what you think.

    I’m flattered you’d be interested in my opinion, Anne. I’ve put the book on my wish-list, but whether or not I’ll remember that you wanted to know my thoughts on it, I don’t know. I can be a bit forgetful, at times, particularly if the thing I’m supposed to remember is rather a long way off.

  45. Tesla
    Apr 19, 2009 @ 17:06:43

    It is likely deliberate that ms. fraser asked people what the absolute minimum age this female character could be if she was going to be this kind of doctor.
    ;)
    sorry for joining the conversation so late :p

  46. Harlequin Medicals 2-in-1 Review: Neurosurgeon and Mum by Kate Hardy / Prince Charming of Harley Street by Anne Fraser | Dear Author
    Sep 14, 2010 @ 14:30:47

    […] have enjoyed a couple of Fraser’s previous books (including one Jayne reviewed favorably here ), but this one fell flat for me. I never really connected with either of the characters, and I […]

%d bloggers like this: