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REVIEW: Bloody Confused, A Clueless American by Chuck Culpepper

Dear Mr. Culpepper,

Yours was a book lingering in my Fictionwise wish list (love, love, love that feature) for a few weeks after the title caught my eye during one browsing session. I’ve grown used to hearing less than positive adjectives attached to the word “American” so wasn’t surprised to see ‘clueless’ added to the list. But the promise of wit and humor in the rest of the title caused my mouse finger to click. The description of the book brought up by said clicking made me wonder if this might finally be my light bulb moment.

What? WTF do I mean by that? Let me explain. I am one of the many Americans who just does_not_get the sport of soccer/football. I’ve tried. Each four years, when the World Cup takes over the planet and most of the population is consumed by it I vow to myself that this time I’ll watch an entire game. This year I’ll finally, finally!, understand just what it is about the sport that causes such devotion and fervor.

And each time I fail. Each time I’ll flip on the TV, I’ll watch fans in the stands going berserk, I’ll listen to announcers relating with breathless attention what’s going on. And I’m bored out of my mind. Usually within 10 minutes. A few times I’ve attempted to stick it out longer but after I realize my eyes are crossing and the screen is getting blurry as I sink into stupor, I toss in the towel. I don’t want to be one of the Ugly Americans stubbornly fixated on American football and basketball (baseball, which seems to consist of players spitting tobacco juice and scratching their balls, is also a snoozefest for me) but I am. I think my fellow reviewer Janine despairs of me but she’s too polite to say so.

And that’s what I mean by light bulb. That this will be The Moment when it all makes sense. When the light goes on, my eyes light up, a smile lights up my face and I rejoice that I can join with so many of my world citizens in appreciating the game. Did I find that nirvana? Alas no.

Instead, I did gain a slight understanding of football as it’s played in England and an in depth look at fans of the sport. Fans who will faithfully follow one team til they die, who travel hours across the country via train, taxi and bus to be segregated into certain parts of a stadium but who will loudly cheer and sing to their team. Even when they lose. Even when they’re relegated.

I loved the sections detailing how steadfast, loyal and true UK football fans are to their team. As the Newcastle men said, it’s not a choice. It appears to be born and bred into you. The possibility of sitting in a stadium, watching a sports event and listening to my fellow spectators singing songs to each other, the opposing fans, the players of both sides and the referees is fascinating and delightful. Reading your examples of their wit and inventiveness left me with sparkling eyes and a big grin.

But enough of the blue bear. Even cuteness gets cloying after a while. And enough of comparisons of how young and uncouth and unsauve America is compared to England. I know they’re great at many things and have history enough for 5 countries but we’re not chopped liver. Even if we do seem determined to use half the world allotment of petroleum products.

Since I know next to nothing about English football and its long held traditions and history, the use of American equivalents as examples to clue me in was a great help. I agree with your astonishment to not be able to purchase a ticket to a game which still has unsold seats left because one doesn’t have a buying history with that club. And how does one acquire a ticket buying history with clubs if one may not buy a ticket? And how do clubs keep track of this? The mind is staggered by the thought of how much manpower and computer bandwidth is occupied in this endeavor.

I agree with other reviews that state that this is not a book for long time footie fans unless they just want an American’s perspective on their game. They’ll already know what you’re just learning. They probably knew what you spent an entire season just starting to learn by the time they were 4. But for clueless Americans, it’s a harmless, easy way to ease yourself into an understanding of how the world’s most popular game is set up and played in the UK.

Since you explained so well and in such detail how you were bored with American sports or maybe just sports in America, I wonder how long your new found love of football will last. Will it equal the many years you spent as a sports commentator here? And how did you find year two of Pompey fandom? And if and when you ever decide you need yet another sports change to recharge your interest, what will be next? The World Wife Carrying Championships? Oh, and inquiring minds want one last burning question answered. Did you ever try a meat pie? B

~Jayne

This book can be purchased in trade paperback from Amazon or Powells or ebook format.

Another long time reader who read romance novels in her teens, then took a long break before started back again about 15 years ago. She enjoys historical romance/fiction best, likes contemporaries, action- adventure and mysteries, will read suspense if there's no TSTL characters and is currently reading very few paranormals.

43 Comments

  1. Anne Douglas
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 07:31:31

    mmmm… Meat pie.

    I’ve never really gotten soccer, either. Not that I don’t understand it, it’s just never been a fervent sport for me. But then, until my later 20′s and hubby #2 I just didn’t really watch much sports, and then it was Rugby.

    I understand your pain though, after rugby, American football is a snoozefest for me :). Offensive team, defensive team, offended team, the coaching team and then the cheerleading team… There’s about four too many teams there for my liking :)

    Now netball on the other hand – super fast, polite argy-bargy (and the not so polite argy-bargy ) and you ahve me on the edge of my seat… especially when NZ is playing AUS (boooooooo!)

  2. Bev Stephans
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 09:19:00

    My son is a diehard ‘footie’ fan. He explains soccer to the rest of the family. Would this be a good book for him or is it better for a novice?

  3. Jayne
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 09:20:32

    Bev, if he already knows about Premier League football, it’d probably be a snoozefest for him.

  4. Jayne
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 09:22:34

    Oh now, I grew up watching American Football and basketball (college level, please) so they’re old favorites. I’ve never seen Rugby though. Though I do like the shorts and what goes in ‘em!

  5. Marsha
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 09:52:41

    I’m an(other) American who finds nothing interesting in soccer while remaining devoted to football (specifically the Buffalo Bills, although I am raising an Eagles fan and thus consider myself well-rounded). For a long time I explained my soccer-related ennui to those interested by pointing out that any game involving non-stop running in the heat for two hours and resulted in a score of 2-1 was ridiculous in its expectations.

    I find cricket more interesting and engaging than soccer, which I think is saying something.

  6. MoJo
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 10:43:11

    Another vote for American football here, especially college football.

  7. LauraB
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 10:45:06

    I’m with Ann on the meat pies! I was quite addicted to the Cornish Pasty (even learned how to make ‘em).

    Before I read Marsha’s comment, I was going to crack a joke about cricket and what that reveals about the British psyche (as well as the rest of the Commonwealth). Talk about being as interesting as watching paint dry. The only amusement I had while living in the UK was winding up my male friends as they were watching test matches by asking lots and lots of “stupid” questions.

    Anyway, I have a question for Jayne: Would this be a good book for people wanting to learn more about English culture? I work in study abroad and am always on the look out for books that amuse and reveal something about the places my students go. Thanks!

  8. Chicklet
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 10:51:59

    See, I like watching soccer for the same reason I like watching hockey: Either team could score at any moment, because the ball (or puck) is in play all the time. An American football game takes 17 years to play because of the incessant timeouts for player substitutions, coaching, and commercials. I can happily knit while an American football game is on TV, because I know that can I look up briefly right before the whistle blows and see the play, then go on and knit another row or two while waiting for the next play. I can’t do that with soccer or hockey, because I’m likely to miss the goals when they happen.

    Which is to say, I’d probably like this book, because I also liked Fever Pitch by Nick Hornby. The Culpepper book might even be more enjoyable, I’m less likely to be flummoxed by references to former Arsenal players. *g*

  9. MCHalliday
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 11:52:18

    And enough of comparisons of how young and uncouth and unsauve America is compared to England.

    Haven’t read the book so I am not quite certain of the particular comparisons but in reference to the UK and football, fans have been known to brawl before and during a game, and after in the streets and on trains. The brawls sometimes end up in riots with police officers injured and bystanders have been killed. Not suave and refined. Nor are ham and veal pies, but I do miss those.

  10. CD
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 13:38:20

    See, I like watching soccer for the same reason I like watching hockey: Either team could score at any moment, because the ball (or puck) is in play all the time.

    Oh most definitely – I can’t see how football (refuse to call it soccer, sorry) is not edge of the seat stuff when it’s played well. This is why you always have to get at least three round of drinks before watching a game in the pub so that some poor bugger isn’t stuck with the job during play…

    I’m sorry but just can’t see the appeal of American football. It goes on for about 15 seconds and then stops. Then goes on again for another 15 seconds. And then a commercial break. Rinse and repeat. I don’t know – maybe it was just the games I saw. Also, I keep comparing it unfavourable with rugby. Although I’ve gotten over the whole “American football is just rugby for sissies”, rugby again seems faster paced and much MUCH better eye-candy ;-). Have you seen the All Blacks performing the Haka? Forget about intimidating the other side, it’s actually to reduce women all over the world into puddles of lust ;-p…

    And cricket [sigh]. I think it really is an acquired taste. Test matches can last for up to five whole days so fever pitch excitement is not something that you can really sustain. It’s a summer thing – you go to a village common with a Sunday paper, a picnic, beer/pimms & lemonade and a group of old friends, and lie in the [ahem] sun while watching a bunch of people in cricket whites bat a ball around. That said, cricket can be incredibly exciting when matches are close – witness when England brought home the Ashes in 2005: both countries were at a standstill…

  11. Wendy
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 13:48:31

    Televised golf anyone?
    I thought of the hockey comparison as well, Chicklet. And of course the Fever Pitch film with Colin Firth.
    Anne Douglas I agree – there is not another game as edge of your seat exciting as netball Australia v. NZ(booooo).

  12. Jayne
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 14:11:34

    Anyway, I have a question for Jayne: Would this be a good book for people wanting to learn more about English culture? I work in study abroad and am always on the look out for books that amuse and reveal something about the places my students go. Thanks!

    LauraB, I’d say yes if the person was also interested in sports. If they’re not, it would probably be about as interesting as, well, paint drying or (to me) actually watching a footie game!

  13. Jayne
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 14:17:46

    Haven't read the book so I am not quite certain of the particular comparisons but in reference to the UK and football, fans have been known to brawl before and during a game, and after in the streets and on trains. The brawls sometimes end up in riots with police officers injured and bystanders have been killed. Not suave and refined. Nor are ham and veal pies, but I do miss those.

    Culpepper did reference these bad old days when he explained how isolated visiting fans are from the home crowd. And how hard it was for him to buy tickets to games as a visitor when he had no buying history with a particular club. He also has a few stories of how he managed to get people to sell him tickets after assuring them that he wasn’t 1) a fan of the visiting team and 2) had no intention of starting a riot. He attended a game in a stadium where (I believe) 96 fans were trampled to death in a riot a number of years ago (I remember reading about it at the time but, forgive me, have since forgotten the stadium. No offense intended).

    edited to correct figures

  14. Jayne
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 14:23:04

    LOL Wendy! I actually like watching a little golf now and then. But mainly on Sunday when the end is near and a fever pitch can be sustained. After taking a class in college, and finding out it’s not as easy as it looks, I do respect the players’ talent. But what is this netball? Must run and google….

  15. Jayne
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 14:27:49

    This is why you always have to get at least three round of drinks before watching a game in the pub so that some poor bugger isn't stuck with the job during play…

    Culpepper says he watched, or tried to get into a pub to watch, many games before he decided on which team to support. Talk about standing room (and barely breathing room) only. He and some Pompey mates he met spent many hours in pubs watching matches and getting liquidly lubricated to attend matches and post-game celebrating matches…

  16. Jayne
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 14:30:48

    Must say, I agree with everyone about hockey which is another game I’m learning. It just wasn’t shown on TV much in the South when I was growing up so it’s taken me til now to get to appreciate it.

  17. Chicklet
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 15:50:31

    Must say, I agree with everyone about hockey which is another game I'm learning. It just wasn't shown on TV much in the South when I was growing up so it's taken me til now to get to appreciate it.

    …And I grew up in Minnesota, colloquially known as “The State of Hockey.” *g* At age eight, I had The Miracle on Ice imprinted on my brain forever (12 of the 20 players on that team, as well as the coach, were from Minnesota). Hockey is the bomb. *g*

  18. Jayne
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 16:05:35

    Chicklet I just watched that DVD a few months ago and was blown away – all over again – by what happened during those Olympics. I wonder if and when Americans will ever again get to experience the thrill that we did while watching that game against the Soviets. I fear we’re too cynical now, too spoiled by our own victories, too expectant of winning. I cringed at the almost cavalier attitude of many US athletes during the past few Olympics, that all they had to do was show up to take the gold.

    By the end of that DVD, I was wiping away a few tears, grinning like a fool and startling my cat and dog by chanting “U-S-A!”

  19. MCHalliday
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 16:30:22

    Culpepper did reference these bad old days when he explained how isolated visiting fans are from the home crowd.

    Culpepper has got it right with the title, ‘Bloody Confused’. The uncouth references to America vs England in a book about the game of footie, with mention of the bad old days and home fans as culprits, has me wondering where and with whom he did his research.

    May 15th this year a riot in Manchester injured 15 police officers and a police dog. The culprits: visiting fans.

    Last month, another six men were charged for assaults on a London train for a total of thirty charged in the train riot. Though the yobos were targeting rival football fans, these men also attacked Londoners simply taking the train.

    Brits were at fault when visiting Brussels in 1985 and their riot caused the death of 39 people, mostly Italians.

    I still remember the 1989 crush at the Sheffield stadium when 96 Liverpool supporters were killed. Both Nottin’m Forest and Liverpool football teams were visiting.

    The history of UK football mayhem is long and ongoing, so forgetting an incident is not the least surprising, Jayne.

    I admit to being a wee bit thrown by the word ‘Pompy’…do you mean Pommy?

  20. SonomaLass
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 16:36:47

    I got caught up in football fever a few summers ago, when we were in the UK during for the last few games of the World Cup. Being in a pub full of people with strong preferences who are familiar with the ins & outs of the game was really exciting. I can never resist the human interest side of sports, are there is a lot of drama surrounding soccer. It does, however, remind me that I am very American — it’s hard for me to watch sports action for so long without a break. I am used to the rhythms of baseball and American football — very different, but both plenty easy to watch whilst doing something else.

    This book might make a good gift for a couple of people I can think of. Thanks for reviewing it!

  21. Jayne
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 16:40:16

    Sheffield is the stadium I was trying to remember. Thanks for filling in that memory gap. The book spans a two year period (2006-7) and Culpepper doesn’t mention any incidents such as you’ve mentioned (which sound horrible). He eventually decided to adopt the Portsmouth Football Club. I’ve gone back and corrected my spelling to “Pompey.”

  22. Jayne
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 16:49:49

    Being in a pub full of people with strong preferences who are familiar with the ins & outs of the game was really exciting. I can never resist the human interest side of sports, are there is a lot of drama surrounding soccer. It does, however, remind me that I am very American -’ it's hard for me to watch sports action for so long without a break. I am used to the rhythms of baseball and American football -’ very different, but both plenty easy to watch whilst doing something else.

    Hmmm, maybe that’s what I’m missing. Being with excited fans who can carry me away on their enthusiasm for the game…

    I love the chances for breaks during American sports games. Culpepper mentions missing things while on a loo break and having to scramble to find out what happened to cause the roar of the crowd.

  23. MCHalliday
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 17:08:19

    I know Portsmouth well! Not the club, mind you. The HMS Victory is not to be missed!

    Jayne, I am intrigued by your Freudian train of thought re: Pommy…from a Warsaw techno book (Pompy) to a lava preserved town Pompey). Must mention, I am glad you didn’t use the abreviated ‘Pom’, which is an offensive slang in some colonies.

  24. Jayne
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 17:24:05

    Actually, “Pompey” (correct spelling) is the term he used – not something I made up.

  25. MCHalliday
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 17:36:08

    Extremely odd, perhaps even bizzaro and yet…writers do have license. Thank you for the clarification, Jayne.

  26. Jayne
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 17:43:02

    Weeeel, actually I need to be even clearer. It’s not a term he invented but what the Portsmouth FC people and fans use themselves to describe themselves.

  27. MCHalliday
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 17:48:04

    That is the clarity I needed and can relate to!

    Now with the informed contextof PFC, “And how did you find year two of Pompey fandom?”, makes complete sense.

  28. Jayne
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 17:53:23

    And that is the clarity I didn’t provide at first. Sorry about the confusion and thanks for nudging me to fix it.

  29. orannia
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 18:14:32

    Now netball on the other hand – super fast, polite argy-bargy (and the not so polite argy-bargy ) and you ahve me on the edge of my seat… especially when NZ is playing AUS (boooooooo!)

    I was on the edge of my seat watching last Sunday’s game (NZ vs Australia). Although, for a supposedly non-contact support there is a lot of (as you so beautifully put it) ‘polite argy-bargy’ :)

    …rugby again seems faster paced and much MUCH better eye-candy ;-). Have you seen the All Blacks performing the Haka? Forget about intimidating the other side, it's actually to reduce women all over the world into puddles of lust ;-p

    Watching the haka is amazing! Going slightly OT, when I arrived back in NZ after 5 years in the UK I almost had an accident driving from the airport to my parents’ house. Why? Because while sitting at a stop sign a bus went past….on the back was a HUGE photo of Dan Carter (an All Black) advertising men’s underwear. To give you an idea of what the ad looked like:

    http://www.jockeynz.co.nz/products.asp?cat=Men&SubCat=Underwear

    Oh, Jayne – when I lived in the UK I was able to go and watch a Boxing Day football match (I can’t remember the two teams now). The singing was amazing….but all the fences separating the supporters was rather scary.

  30. CD
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 18:47:05

    Watching the haka is amazing! Going slightly OT, when I arrived back in NZ after 5 years in the UK I almost had an accident driving from the airport to my parents' house. Why? Because while sitting at a stop sign a bus went past….on the back was a HUGE photo of Dan Carter (an All Black) advertising men's underwear. To give you an idea of what the ad looked like:

    http://www.jockeynz.co.nz/products.asp?cat=Men&SubCat=Underwear

    THANK YOU SOOOO MUCH!! That’s was lovely. It’s a good thing I don’t drive… Your story reminds me of the huge rise in traffic accidents next to that old “Hello Boys” wonderbra ad ;-).

    For those of you who have never seen a haka – here’s a little pressie.

  31. Jayne
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 19:12:29

    Oh. Oh, my. ::fans self:: Orannia that’s a lovely photo of a lovely man. Thank you indeed!

    CD, I’ll be honest and admit I had no fricken’ clue what you were talking about but…Now I Know. Now I Appreciate. Grrrrrrl.

  32. Anne Douglas
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 19:13:47

    I haven’t seen a game of anything for so long (we have poor mans tv and I haven’t downloaded any of late.)

    I don’t think there is anything in the world like the Haka before a big rugby match. It really has put some teams off their game, especially when the players get really up in their face with the opposing team. Although there was that one year when the South Africans?? turned the tables and got right back in the All Blacks faces – it was game on after than, baby!

    As to what netball is, its hard to explain. Like basketball on a smaller court, but you’re not allowed to travel, and players are restricted to certain areas of the court and only two players can shoot from in a small enforced area. It’s good stuff, and unlike basketball, tall isn’t a requirement ( a bonus, yes), some of the most vicious…err successful players can be short :)

    edit: there is a second Haka the All Blacks do, too. One that involves them mimicking cutting the oppositions throats… we Kiwis can be a blood thirsty lot :D

  33. Jayne
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 19:23:48

    Found this Haka version after I watched what CD linked us to. L’dMAO.

  34. Marsha
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 19:50:01

    Another fun Haka vid for those of us who appreciate Highlander romances: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_WEP9ZkpS4

  35. Jayne
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 21:29:13

    Marsha, that was priceless. And reminds me of something a dear friend of mine told me. Her hubby is a die-hard Sunderland fan and sometimes attends games with a Scottish friend of his who usually ends up getting plastered and whipping his kilt up at the after game pub visits.

  36. CD
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 22:47:26

    I don't think there is anything in the world like the Haka before a big rugby match. It really has put some teams off their game, especially when the players get really up in their face with the opposing team. Although there was that one year when the South Africans?? turned the tables and got right back in the All Blacks faces – it was game on after than, baby!

    Wasn’t that the NZ-Tonga match when the All Blacks did the Haka as usual but then the Tongalese (?) did the Sipi Tau right back at them? Complete overload of testosterone there… Also remember another story – I think it was a NZ-France game where the French stupidly turned their backs on the All Blacks while they were doing the Haka (most teams just silently face the AB while they do it). The Kiwis were so pissed off by this blatent disrespect that they went on to completely destroy the French.

    Marsha – that vid was indeed priceless. Personal experience, though, is that it is SO not true ;-). I did like the flowing hair, though…

  37. LauraB
    Nov 06, 2008 @ 23:15:22

    Okay, now that the thread has started to reveal in All Black awesomeness (hmmm… yummy). Here’s something that I saw over on the Smart Bitches last summer. Apparently, the All Blacks play a naked during the NZ winter to raise money for charity. Here’s the link: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/us_world/galleries/naked_rugby/naked_rugby.html

    (fanning myself). : P

  38. K. Z. Snow
    Nov 07, 2008 @ 02:47:55

    Dan Carter (an All Black) advertising men's underwear.

    Nice . . . but what’s with the mushroom cap in his shorts?

    :-)

  39. Hortense Powdermaker
    Nov 07, 2008 @ 02:56:26

    That gingerbread haka was one I hadn’t seen – it’s funny and cute – thanks for the link.

    Salman Rushdie wrote about following the Tottenham Hotspurs, and Adam Gopnik had a great article in the New Yorker (titled Endgame) about learning to appreciate “footy” while he was living in France. Until reading their essays I didn’t care for sports writing – but when it’s done right, it can be pretty illuminating.

    I’ll have to try Bloody Confused.

  40. Jayne
    Nov 07, 2008 @ 08:19:17

    Laura, that was something nice to wake up to. Thanks!

  41. Marsha
    Nov 07, 2008 @ 09:23:45

    Her hubby is a die-hard Sunderland fan and sometimes attends games with a Scottish friend of his who usually ends up getting plastered and whipping his kilt up at the after game pub visits.

    Now, see, if soccer/football came with more of that, I might see my way to becoming a fan. I mean, Brandi Chastain in her bra is one thing – but how much of that do you really get?

    Marsha – that vid was indeed priceless. Personal experience, though, is that it is SO not true ;-). I did like the flowing hair, though…

    I can’t hear you, I can’t hear you, I can’t hear you…

    I’m at work now so I can’t check the whole nekkid thing but it’s first on the agenda for after the kids go to bed tonight. Ooooh, baby…thank God it’s Friday!

  42. Keven
    Dec 01, 2008 @ 14:00:54

    - Pompey is the nickname of the town of Portsmouth first, and then was transferred to the football club. The orgin of the nickname is lost in time but it’s at least 180 years old.

    - 96 fans were crushed at Hillsborough in Sheffield, the home of Sheffield Wednesday. Not really Sheffield stadium as there’s two major clubs in Sheffield. It wasn’t really a riot. More a case of too many people trying to get in to an area that was too small for them. The fences had been put up beforehand to stop people getting onto the pitch and this meant that there was no way to reduce the pressure. The fences had been put up partly because of…

    - The Heysel disaster in Brussels where Liverpool fans (English, not Brits, that slip will upset Scots in particular) rioted before a game with Juventus of Turin. It caused a crush against a wall that collapsed with 39 deaths.

    - Clubs go to extraordinary lengths to ensure that rival fans are not in the same parts of the stadium. Unlike in the US where stadiums are usually hundreds of miles away from each other most clubs are close together (some a matter of less than a mile) so the possibility of this occuring is actually quite great. Imagine putting a couple of dozen Dallas Cowboys fans in the middle of the most rabid Eagles fans and you get the picture of what would happen.

    - The amount of violence at football games has been hugely reduced since its peak in the 70′s and 80′s. Mainly due to demographics and the efforts of clubs and the police.

    - It’s Tottenham Hotspur. Singular. The nickname is the Spurs.

    - In my opinion, as someone who’s spent a decade or more in the US and the UK. Football is fantastic to play, and fantastic to watch live. It’s difficult to watch on TV if you haven’t done the first two. Baseball is similar, though it takes too long to really enjoy live (thank God for hot dogs and lite beer). American Football is the perfect game for TV, it’s the designed for instant replays and commercials. Rugby sucks, particularly Rugby League, less so Union. the Haka’s are great though, as is anytime the opposition disrespects them. Damn Kiwis act like it’s some kind of god given right to wind up the opposition with no recourse. Cricket is fun, but one-day is better to watch than five-day. Five-day cricket is a state of mind. Basketball is dull, particularly the pros. March Madness is great, but mainly because there’s always money riding on it. I like watching Golf, but that’s just me. I wouldn’t expect everyone to feel the same way…

  43. Jayne
    Dec 02, 2008 @ 09:35:45

    Kevin, thanks for your insight and info on the subject (s). I know I’ll never play footie but perhaps one day I can catch a live game and maybe understand what all the fuss is about.

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