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REVIEW: A Conspiracy of Kings by Megan Whalen Turner

A Conspiracy of Kings coverDear Ms. Turner,

Somehow, I've become a huge fan of your YA series. My love for the books has taken me by surprise because the first book, The Thief, was slow to engage me and aimed at a younger audience than the later books. It wasn't until the second half of that book that I was drawn in and not until the second half of the second book, The Queen of Attolia, did I become a true fan.

By the time I got my hands on The King of Attolia, though, I was enthralled with almost every page, and I am happy to report that the fourth book, A Conspiracy of Kings, which was just released on March 23rd (Can you tell I've been counting the days?) is nearly as satisfying.

My reviews of the earlier books can be found here:

Review of The Thief
Review of The Queen of Attolia
Review of The King of Attolia

Before I review A Conspiracy of Kings, I want to warn readers that due to the way these books are written, it is almost impossible to discuss any of the later three books without giving away spoilers for the earlier books in the series. Therefore this review will contain SPOILERS for books 1-3. Readers who have not yet read these books, who may want to read them and who prefer to avoid spoilers are advised to read no further.

Like the other books in this series, A Conspiracy of Kings is set in the fictional kingdoms of Sounis, Eddis and Attolia, which are patterned on Greece. But this book differs from the others in that the focus here is not Eugenides, the hero of the first three novels in this series. Gen does make an appearance in this book, and play a significant role, but in this book, the main character is Sophos, Gen's traveling companion from The Thief.

Readers of the earlier books may recall that Sophos disappeared in The Queen of Attolia, and in this book, we learn what befell him at that time, and during the events of The King of Attolia as well.

A Conspiracy of Kings begins with a third person prologue in which Sophos and the Magus (his elderly, wise advisor) arrive in Attolia and try to attract attention from Gen (now the king of Attolia) without drawing any to themselves. As Eugenides and his wife ride in an open coach, Sophos aims a peashooter at Eugenides, but Gen does not show recognition even after being hit with the pea.
Eventually, though, the Magus and Sophos do manage to gain an audience with Eugenides, who greets Sophos warmly-‘at least until he hears that Sophos is now king of Sounis.

What is the king of Sounis doing arriving in an enemy country without a retinue? In the next several chapters, Sophos narrates his story in first person, and we learn where he has been all this time and why he arrived in Attolia as he did.

Sophos' tale begins in the country of Sounis, back when he was nephew to the king and heir to the throne. His father could find nothing right with Sophos, who was more interested in poetry and plays than in swordsmanship and political machinations. As Sophos tells it, his father blamed the Magus who had been Sophos' teacher, and had Sophos sent to the island of Letnos to study under new tutors, first one who indulged in drinking, then another who turned abusive.

One day, Letnos is invaded by a company of armed men. Sophos manages to overcome a couple of them, and to herd his mother and sisters into a hiding place in the ice house. But then he is captured and gagged, and has to watch helplessly as the villa is burned. Sophos is filled with grief for his sisters and mother, and anger that is directed at both himself and others. He refuses to cooperate with his captors, who reveal their intention to kill the king and use Sophos as a puppet monarch in his place.

The man who takes charge of Sophos is a slaver named Basrus. Sophos' face is scarred and his hair is dyed so he will not be recognized, and he is then taken on a slave ship to the island of Hanaktos. But there the captors' plans go awry. Basrus leaves Sophos in the care of another slaver for a short while, instructing the man that Sophos isn't for sale, but while Basrus is gone, a baron's softhearted daughter, Berrone, decides to rescue the slave that is Sohpos. The price she offers for him is so handsome that Basrus's friend sells him despite the orders to the contrary, and Sophos finds himself in Baron Hakantos' home- only to realize that the baron was in on the kidnapping plot.

The baron, however, does not know that Sophos was purchased by his daughter and is now among the field slaves, and Sophos does his best to act the part of a slave so as not to draw attention to himself. Sophos worries that he is becoming what he is pretending to be:

My freedom was like my missing tooth, a hole where something had been that was now gone. I worried at the idea of it, just as I slid my tongue back and forth across the already healing hole in my gum. I tasted the last bloody spot and tried to remember the feel of the tooth that had been there. I had been a free man. Now I was not.

But as time goes on, Sophos is surprised to realize that slavery has become a strange comfort to him:

I was still happy. It was no rest day. I faced a day in the hot sun, shifting dirt and stones, with scant food and ignorant company, and I'd never felt so much at peace. I laughed at myself as I shifted on my pallet for a more comfortable spot and a few minutes' rest. Let me be beaten, I thought, and then see how well I liked being a slave. Too soon the overseer knocked on the doorway with his stick, and we all rose, grumbling, for another day.

I had grown skilled at shifting dirt. If I couldn't compete with some of the men in the field with me, I could keep up with most of them. I worked hard, I slept well at night, and I dreamed often. I grieved, but a part of me felt a lightening of the burden I had carried all my life: that I could never be worthy of them, that I would always disappoint or fail them. As an unknown slave in the fields of the baron, I knew the worst was over. I had failed them. At least I could not do so again.

Eventually though, an opportunity to change his circumstances comes along, and Sophos must choose whether to maintain his disappearance or to step forward and claim a throne he never wanted.

A Conspiracy of Kings is an immensely satisfying book and probably my second favorite in the series, after The King of Attolia (I loved the last third of The Queen of Attolia to bits but I thought the book took too long to get there).

While Sophos isn't as charismatic or amazingly multifaceted a character as Eugenides, he is still very sympathetic. It is interesting to compare his portrayal here to the one in The Thief. In that book, which was told in Gen's first person POV, Sophos came across as younger, but very sweet and lovable. In this one, Sophos is the main POV character (the book alternates between his first person POV and omniscient third person). We see though his own eyes that Sophos is hard on himself, and doesn't always paint himself in a flattering light. For this reason, I found him a little less lovable here, but more complex and compelling.

This is a story about how a young man begins to come into his own, and Sophos' journey to greater self-confidence kept me turning the pages. I shared in his grief for his mother and sisters, in the freedom he experienced at a time when he was (ironically) pretending to be a slave, in his dreams of a magical library, in his love for and wariness of his friend Gen turned king of an enemy country, and in his longing for the woman he had loved for years.

There is one thing I'm torn about. I would have been disappointed had there been less of Gen in this book, yet at the same time, I did feel that Sophos faded a bit during those third person sections in which Eugenides appeared. The problem is that Gen has turned into such a compelling character that he casts most of the other characters into the shade. Thus, much of the book was Sophos' story, yet when Gen's presence was felt, the book became something else, and for this reason, it took some getting used to the transitions between the first person and third person sections.

I would have loved for there to be more of Irene (Attolia) in this book. She was mostly in the background and I greatly missed her. There is one scene in which Eugenides describes the moment he knew he was in love with her, and that is probably my favorite scene in the whole book.

As for Sophos' own romantic relationship with Helen, the queen of Eddis, it really tugged at my heartstrings to see how much she meant to him and I felt his love for her even when they were apart.

I have just a few more quibbles. One is that I never got a good fix on Sophos' father. The book seemed to alternate between two interpretations of this character. Also, the section just before the book's climactic scene felt a bit slow, one plot turn was a bit convenient, and in discussing the book with my friend Elle, she pointed out another contrivance that I hadn't noticed.

Nonetheless, I enjoyed A Conspiracy of Kings tremendously. Adventure, intrigue, and romance – this book had them all. That climactic scene near the end was thrilling, the love story was both poignant and romantic, and then there was Eugenides, who is such an amazing character. Although Sophos could not equal Gen in that regard, he was still interesting, sympathetic, and worth rooting for. A- for A Conspiracy of Kings.

Sincerely,

Janine

PS I hope there will be a fifth book in this series — it seems like there is plenty of fodder for one. And if there is another, I personally would love to have one of the women as a main POV character. You write such strong and interesting female characters that I wish I could see more of them. I also adore Eugenides, so of course I can't wait for more of him, too.

This is a book published by one of the “Agency 5″ but it is a hardcover and the ebook price is $9.99

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Janine Ballard loves well-paced, character driven novels in historical romance, fantasy, YA, and the occasional outlier genre. Recent examples include novels by Katherine Addison, Meljean Brook, Kristin Cashore, Cecilia Grant, Rachel Hartman, Ann Leckie, Jeannie Lin, Rose Lerner, Courtney Milan, Miranda Neville, and Nalini Singh. Janine also writes fiction. Her critique partners are Sherry Thomas, Meredith Duran and Bettie Sharpe. Her erotic short story, “Kiss of Life,” appears in the Berkley anthology AGONY/ECSTASY under the pen name Lily Daniels. You can email Janine at janineballard at gmail dot com or find her on Twitter @janine_ballard.

20 Comments

  1. Annie
    Apr 05, 2010 @ 14:21:05

    Great review, but the links for the other book in the series aren’t linked to the proper pages.

  2. Janine
    Apr 05, 2010 @ 14:37:23

    @Annie: Wow, that is totally bizarre. I just checked the html code in my review and in the code, the links are correct. I have no idea why it’s taking me to a different page when I click on them. I’ll see if we can get the problem fixed.

  3. Angie
    Apr 05, 2010 @ 14:51:08

    Janine, wasn’t it wonderful? I’m delighted to see you enjoyed it. And I agree re: Sophos and Eugenides. They’re not in the same ballpark personality/charisma-wise, but their friendship kills me. Eugenides’ loyalty and Sophos’ growing a spine. I ate it up.

    And there are two more books coming in the series. I agree with you, let’s get one from Attolia’s or Eddis’ points of view. I’ll vote for Attolia first because, like you, the closer and the more of Gen we get the happier I’ll be.

  4. Janine
    Apr 05, 2010 @ 15:13:38

    @Angie: Yes, it was absolutely wonderful.

    Attolia would be my first choice for a POV character in the next book too. Not just because she is closer to Eugenides but also because she is such a fascinating character in her own right.

    Where did you hear that there are two more books planned? If there is an interview with Turner where she talks about her future plans for the series, I would love to read it.

  5. Angie
    Apr 05, 2010 @ 15:26:02

    Janine, agreed on Attolia. I love her. The last half of QUEEN had me in paroxysm of joy. Partially because she was so much cooler than I expected and then, well, the ending and all…

    In two recent interviews, she’s mentioned the last two books in the series. One with R.J. Anderson over at The Enchanted Inkpot. And one over at Literary Life Notes. She’s pretty tight-lipped, but it’s fun to read.

  6. Janine
    Apr 05, 2010 @ 15:44:35

    @Annie: The review links have been fixed.

    @Angie: Thanks for the interview links. I skimmed the one at The Enchanted Inkpot yesterday but missed the mention of the upcoming books. Am looking forward to reading the one at Literary Life Notes.

  7. Liza Lester
    Apr 05, 2010 @ 15:55:28

    Janine, I discovered this series through your reviews, and I want to thank you- because Turner is fantastic. The Thief, as you say, is a slow starter and more of a childrens’ novel. And the clever trick of Gen’s first POV narration requires that he is not entirely likable at the start of the story. I confess, I’ve become a really impatient reader. A book like The Thief needs a good review or some other form of notoriety to hook me. I also hope Attolia will get more stage time the future. The lovely female characters are a bit overshadowed by Turner’s charismatic men. I’ve wondered if this series has a strong boy following; it read, to me, as boy-like, even with the romantic aspects.

  8. Janine
    Apr 05, 2010 @ 16:33:28

    @Liza Lester: You’re welcome. I too am grateful to my friends who turned me onto this series. A friend gave me The King of Attolia but I decided to start with The Thief. I agree with everything you say about The Thief and I sometimes wonder if I would have continued with the series (even though I ended up enjoying that book) if I hadn’t still had The King of Attolia in my TBR.

    I also agree that the series is oriented toward its male characters and I wouldn’t be surprised if it has a boy following. For that reason I wonder if the next books will also be oriented toward the male characters, but I know I will be reading the next book one way or another.

  9. Emily
    Apr 05, 2010 @ 17:23:47

    She will be doing booksignings and I highly recommend that you go see her if she’s anywhere close to you. She is a hoot to be around. Funny, wryly sarcastic, and smart.

    I’d love to see more of Ina, the sister.

  10. Janine
    Apr 05, 2010 @ 17:28:36

    @Emily:

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    Ina was a great character and one I would love to see more of as well. I didn’t mention her in my review for fear of spoiling the book for some readers, but I totally agree.

  11. Michelle
    Apr 05, 2010 @ 17:31:44

    Yeah so glad you loved it. I loved it too. I hooked someone in the office on the series. So Sunday I tweeted her “mankiller, bunny, iced cakes”. Then “hurray for the magus” and finally “Sophos kicks butt”. I loved Sophos and Gen’s interactions, along with Attolia and Eddis. Those 2 seemed to be closer. Loved Eddis Minister of War-glad to see his cameo. Also loved the scenes where the Magus and Sophos talked about past times. So many good scenes. Once I get my book back I will do a slow reread. Also I hope that there will be an audioversion.

  12. Janine
    Apr 05, 2010 @ 17:50:18

    @Michelle: I loved the “Bunny” nickname too. Also loved the story about the wolf. Yeah, there were a lot of great scenes. One of my faves was the scene at the gathering of the Sounisian barons.

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    I wonder how Sophos and Helen will work out their two monarchies and their marriage. Will Sounis and Eddis join into one country? If so how will that go? And if not, where will Sophos and Helen live?

  13. Jennie
    Apr 05, 2010 @ 22:37:12

    Thanks for the great review, Janine – I am really looking forward to this one. I credit you with turning me onto the series, so thanks for that, too!

  14. Elle
    Apr 05, 2010 @ 22:38:24

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    SPOILERS…..SPOILERS….SPOILERS
    @Janine:

    I wonder how Sophos and Helen will work out their two monarchies and their marriage. Will Sounis and Eddis join into one country? If so how will that go? And if not, where will Sophos and Helen live?

    Good questions. Since part of Eddis’s plan is to move her people away from the mountain (to protect them from the volcanic eruption foretold by the gods,) it seems logical that she will begin transferring her base of power to Sounis over time. There is a lot of intolerance and bigotry among the members of the different kingdoms (the nobles of both Sounis and Attolia mockingly refer to the natives of Eddis as “goat feet”, for example, and the Attolians view everyone else as barbarians,) so I suspect that any attempt to merge the kingdoms of Eddis and Sounis will meet with resistance. Gen seemed to think that he would be the main target of the Eddisians resentment for Helen’s partial loss of autonomy, but (to me) it seems as though they would be pretty unhappy with Sophos as well.

    @Michelle: I really hope that they come out with an audioversion as well, and soon. I have the first three books in audioversion and I never get tired of listening to them.

  15. Janine
    Apr 05, 2010 @ 23:39:02

    @Jennie: You’re welcome, Jennie! I’d love to hear your thoughts on this book, and anyone else’s, too.

    @Elle:

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    SPOILERS…..SPOILERS….SPOILERS

    I agree that it’s doubtful that Eugenides will be the only one the Eddisians blame. Plus I’m not sure the Sounisians will be happy about an influx of Eddisians across their border. It should make for an interesting couple of books, esp. when you factor the angry Medes.

  16. Michelle
    Apr 06, 2010 @ 09:33:18

    One thing, for people who haven’t started the series, don’t skip the Thief. It is wonderful and really lays the groundwork for the relationships, especially between the Magus, Gen, and Sophos. Plus the scene between Attolia and Gen-priceless.

    Spoiler
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    The one thing that people need to remember is that the oath Gen swore as the Thief was to Eddis the country, not Eddis the ruler. So his actions have to be what is best for the Country Eddis and not necessarily Helen. Also remember when the Magus said originally Eddis/Attlia/Sounis used to be united as one kingdom. They have to be united to stand against the Mede. I still hope that the series ends with Gen teaching his grandson or granddaughter all his tricks so they can take over as Thief.

    At recorded books they list the audioversion for ACOK as Jan 2011-so it looks like it is planned. I need to try to find a cd copy of The Thief since I have it in cassette, and my new car only had cd now. The audioversions are wonderful.

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  19. Verona St. James
    Jul 26, 2010 @ 18:53:20

    My library finally got this and I gobbled it up all in one sitting last night. I did miss Gen in this book, but this one still had some really great moments. I loved the library dreams, and I LOVED the climactic moment at the end.

    I felt like she kind of glossed over Sophos’ grief for his family, though, I didn’t really get the emotion of it, and so I…
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    I never really thought they were dead and wasn’t at all surprised that they were still alive at the end of the book.

    I can’t wait to read the next books in this series. I think one of the amazing things Turner does in this series is continually turn expectations on their heads.

    I think this makes the experience so rich, because you’re thinking one thing the first time you read it, and then on the re-read you know what’s coming but now you can watch her set it up.

  20. Janine
    Jul 26, 2010 @ 21:43:14

    @Verona St. James:

    Glad you enjoyed the book. The library dreams were some of my favorite scenes. I also loved the dream about the wolf.

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    I wasn’t sure if they had really died or not. I thought Sophos might be suppressing his grief because it was huge. Sometimes when emotions are really powerful, people stuff them instead of feeling them. With that said, by now I’m used to Turner’s way of pulling rabbits out of her hat, so I wasn’t as surprised by some of the twists in this story as I had been by the twists in the earlier books.

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