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REVIEW: The Lawyer’s Luck by Piper Huguley

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“Trust in the Lord with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. 6 In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths.” Proverbs 3:5-6

Oberlin, Ohio – 1844

Lawrence Stewart is a rare man. Raised with his grandmother’s Miami Indian tribe, as a Negro he has consistently walked between two worlds most of his life. He devotes his time and study to becoming a lawyer, fully intending to obtain justice for the ousted Miami Indians. No Negro man has accomplished these things before, but he is not daunted. He studies for his exams as he rides circuit through the backwoods of Ohio, handing out justice to people who cannot easily reach a courthouse. His life is perfectly set until one June day….

Aurelia “Realie” Baxter made her way from enslavement in Georgia to the free land Lake Huron in Ohio. Far from happy as a slave doing the bidding of a woman cooped up in a house all day, Realie is a bona fide tomboy with a special gift with horses. Now, she is so close to freedom in Canada, she can smell it, but her plans are interrupted when Lawrence shoots her…by mistake….

Lawrence cannot study encumbered with the care of an enslaved woman, but he’s responsible for her injury…

Realie wants to get to Canada, but Lawrence won’t let her get away in trying to help her…

One chance meeting can change your life from what you thought you wanted….to what you really need.

Dear Ms. Huguley,

Your recent post to our Open Thread for Authors brought your historical series to my attention and when Sunita mentioned she was looking into the full length novel, I decided to try the novella.

I was slightly put off by some awkwardness in the first chapter – Lawrence seems to be intensely searching for his horse but initially only staying on the tavern porch while doing so and then frets about the time it will take him to chase it down and thus risk making him late for his next circuit justice appearance. He’d certainly be much later if he has to walk, right? But Realie’s take-no-nonsense attitude towards this “fancy man” made me want to persevere to see more of her. Thankfully once the story really gets going, I didn’t notice much more of this.

Lawrence and Realie are from two different worlds yet not. Though Lawrence has never known slavery, as a mixed race, brown skinned man he’s had an uphill climb in getting people to accept him as a lawyer. Realie’s blunt truths about life as a slave make him realize how little he truly knows about the sort of life she’s endured and what drove her to run. Although she can irritate him with her attitudes and assumptions, he slowly comes to admire her determination and fierce will to be free.

Realie can’t understand how Lawrence might be able to help her legally and finds his notions and genteel mannerisms bizarre in contrast to what she’s experienced at the hands of men up until then. She trusts no one and only reluctantly stays with Lawrence, or Lawyer as she calls him, while giving everyone else the side-eye. Even the people who help shelter her still speak in front of her as if she’s not there and it’s only through their loan to Lawrence that she can be bought to freedom.

I thought the initial clash between the two – she’s trying to steal his horse to make the last push to Canada and he accidentally shoots her in the arm – and their subsequent misunderstandings were realistic. Realie can’t afford to let down her guard and Lawrence bristles at what he sees as her stubbornness and views of him as a man who must be paid back in kind for helping her. Though they had started moving towards an understanding and appreciation of each other, they were separated shortly after at a point where, from how I saw it, their feelings were still forming. Then suddenly when they’re back together, they’re in love. That part felt too rushed to me.

Realie’s experience as a slave is not sugar coated and the very matter of fact way it’s described made all the more impact. Subtle touches drove home her reality – she gets mad at Lawrence for not caring enough to know the horse’s name, just as her master never could keep his slaves names straight and she always has to weigh and judge everyone’s actions because words and promises are cheap and often not kept for slaves. Just walking down a street in Ohio where and when she wants to go is new and wonderful experience for her.

I was confused by Lawrence’s white mentor and Realie’s former owner. The Ohio abolitionist still thinks Realie might steal the silver and only reluctantly loans Lawrence the money to free her while Mr. Milford seems almost happy that Realie will be free and has found love. Perhaps it’s just that neither is quite what I expected.

Lawrence and Realie both believe in God though Realie feels she’s seen little evidence of God caring much for her. Lawrence on the other hand is a deeply religious man who prays with meaning and is determined to not enter any physical relationship with Realie before a Christian marriage.

To be honest, I had to keep reading past the first scene as the way the characters act and – I’m not sure what the proper writing term is – move through the scene is a touch awkward. The ending felt a bit rushed and I didn’t truly feel I’d seen these two fall in love. Respect yes but the love was too fast. Still I enjoyed Realie’s grit and Lawrence’s core decency, the historical details and this opportunity to see persons of color as the main characters of the story. B-

~Jayne

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Another long time reader who read romance novels in her teens, then took a long break before started back again about 15 years ago. She enjoys historical romance/fiction best, likes contemporaries, action- adventure and mysteries, will read suspense if there's no TSTL characters and is currently reading very few paranormals.

4 Comments

  1. cleo
    Aug 02, 2014 @ 13:46:09

    I’m glad you reviewed this – I just read about it somewhere this week. It sounded intriguing, but tbh, the blurb put me off – both because the writing was a little awkward, and more importantly, Oberlin is by Lake Erie, not Lake Huron. (And afik, Lake Huron has never bordered Ohio). If this is in the book, I don’t think I can read it. I can suspend a lot of disbelief when reading romance, but not basic geography.

  2. Jayne
    Aug 02, 2014 @ 17:52:00

    @cleo: To be honest, all I can remember is that a lake is mentioned but I don’t recall if it’s mentioned by name.

  3. Sunita
    Aug 02, 2014 @ 18:01:52

    As you’ll see in my upcoming review, I had similar reactions to the novel, both in terms of strengths and weaknesses. I think the author has a lot of imagination and the books are unlike much of what I read in historical romance, but there are execution issues. I’m hoping that these will smooth out in future releases.

  4. Jayne
    Aug 02, 2014 @ 18:15:58

    @Sunita: I’m hoping the writing style will improve with time as well.

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