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REVIEW: Crazy Good by Rachel Robinson

Crazy Good by Rachel Robinson

Dear Ms. Robinson:

I’ve kind of hit my limit on books that denigrate almost every female in the book but the heroine (or the heroine’s best friend) in order to make the heroine appear more appealing. Not to mention that this is the second book I’ve read that has hero or hero’s friends make a joke referring to Hilary Clinton as a man. No matter what your political affiliation, seeing that is neither a) funny or b) attractive.

But that’s the least of the offensive things in the book. Maverick Hart is a super wealthy man who turned away from his family and became a Navy SEAL. For some reason, this causes dissension in his family and Maverick shuns them. This family conflict (which goes pretty much unexplained throughout the entire story and is resolved with the same attention to deal — read: none) is the source of Maverick’s self loathing which only comes out when the object of his pursuit, Windsor Forbes, falls in love with him.

Maverick’s crying about his poor, pitiable past was almost comical in its lameness. I’m all for not aggrandizing deep mental issues for the sake of a book, but at least make his inner torment equal to his emotional response. In other words, the non stop self flagellation about how his family just doesn’t understand and support him is lady boner deflating.

I guess that’s why Maverick is constantly sticking his dick in things. Even he realizes on some subconscious level that he’s got less mental fortitude than a toddler.

Maverick pursues Windsor hot and heavy, confesses his love for her but when she’s ready to return it he decides to push her away for her own good, of course, because even though Windsor is a grown ass woman, she’s not able to make decisions for herself.

I found elements of Crazy Good to be patterned after Top Gun with Maverick playing the Tom Cruise role of the feckless charmer and his best friend Steve as Goose.

Maverick has a low opinion of woman (as does basically everyone in this book). For instance, all chicks are bad drivers. “She is looking around, like all chicks do when they’re supposed to be driving.” He only screws woman in motels and won’t ever bring them back home because they’re just holes for his pleasure seeking. They don’t even warrant a head tap if he’s getting a BJ. But we know Windsor is special because she gets to not only have sex in his house but also is warned that he’s going to blow down her throat. Nothing says true love like a warning of incoming spunk.  “Should I give her the gentlemanly tap? Usually I don’t. ” Then there was the time our heroine muses to herself that “Women have no self-respect” when another girl hits on Maverick in front of her.

And let’s not forget the hilarious Hilary Clinton joke. Three SEALs including our favorite hero are at target practice.

“I ignore Stone and Steve’s loud ass conversation about which bad guy the holey cut-out looks more like….

“Fine. We’ll just agree it looks like Hilary Clinton and be done with this shit,” Steve chortles as they walk over to me.”

Windsor is supposed to be this sad girl whose lover cheated on her but for someone who is supposed to be scared of relationships she capitulates quite easily to Maverick. She’s a pale character next to the her friend Morganna who gets all the good lines and apparently the good shoes too although she’s portrayed as someone almost unbearable to work for or even live with.

There’s some inside joke that the author is actually a wife of a Navy SEAL, per the acknowledgments and the dedication not to mention this line: “Did you know there are twenty-five different ways to give a blow job? Or that one of the wives is writing a romance novel about Navy SEALs? ” Or at least that’s what we’re supposed to be lead to think.

There’s nothing particularly heroic about the presentation of these SEALs. It’s told to us many, many, many times that Maverick is a manwhore. I have no doubt that this is a true representation of what real Navy SEALs are like. Guys who know how to operate heavy equipment and get laid.  “During training there is a phone number you call in the middle of the night and a girl comes to you wherever you’re at and blows you.” 

The last 25% of the book takes a complete detour from CrazyTown into WhatdidIjustreadville and turns into this funeral dirge. This last part was emotionally gripping in parts and is part of the reason why I believe there are several positive reviews. It was moving reading about certain things [although they seemed ripped from Top Gun], despite the obvious manipulation of it.

There are good parts like the friendship between Maverick and Steve. I liked Steve’s wife, Morganna, who is described (of course) as a ball buster because she doesn’t take shit from anyone. There were a few times when I laughed. But overall I cringed at the portrayal of women in the book and frankly the men too who acted half the time like they had the mental capacity of an infant focused on one thing–the boob. There’s no nuance here. I can see readers being entertained by the overly possessive manwhore in pursuit so long as she doesn’t mind feeling insulted now and again. D

Best regards,

Jane

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Jane Litte is the founder of Dear Author, a lawyer, and a lover of pencil skirts. She spends her downtime reading romances and writing about them. Her TBR pile is much larger than the one shown in the picture and not as pretty. You can reach Jane by email at jane @ dearauthor dot com

11 Comments

  1. Lucy Woodhull
    Apr 27, 2014 @ 12:02:07

    Sigh. Doesn’t matter if you love Hillary or hate her (or Ann Coulter, etc. etc.) — reducing a woman to nothing more than her looks in order to shit on her hurts ALL women. No man who laughed at this “joke” would get anywhere near my lady parts, for it shows a contempt for all women.

  2. Lynn S.
    Apr 27, 2014 @ 12:51:46

    I can’t even get past the cover. Does Gomez know what Thing is up to these days?

  3. cleo
    Apr 27, 2014 @ 15:24:58

    @Lynn S.: +1. That is a seriously creepy cover.

  4. Veron
    Apr 27, 2014 @ 16:08:18

    I’m glad that I’m not the only one thinking that this was a bad representation of the SEALs. Unfortunately, I read Crazy Good in between the non-fiction SEAL books Lone Survivor and Fearless and ended up seriously pissed at Maverick. He’s only human, but the mistake he did clearing the room—I was shocked as much as his friend, Stone. It was his behavior though that I had some issues with. The whole purpose of BUD/S (SEAL training):
    “… a distillation of the human spirit, a tradition-bound ordeal that seeks to find men with character, courage and the burning desire to win at all costs, men who would rather die than quit.” ~ The Warrior Elite
    So yes, a SEAL is not only about physical strength, but also character … and in my opinion, Maverick was lacking the latter.

  5. Andrea T
    Apr 27, 2014 @ 18:50:38

    I often feel alone in this, but I am so tired if the “hero” who’s so butthurt over his family or an ex, so therefore treats women as objects to unload on or in. In no way do I find that charming or sexy.

    I’m also over the heroine being the only “female of worth” (for lack of better term, damn you, BDB) with all other women being bitches/whores.

    Thanks for the entertaining review!

  6. Andrea D
    Apr 27, 2014 @ 20:37:01

    @Lynn S.: I’ve seen a few covers with a waist up shot of a man with disembodied hand(s) on him. It’s a very odd trend and not appealing, I think.

  7. Maura
    Apr 28, 2014 @ 10:02:05

    “Windsor Forbes?”

  8. katrina
    Apr 29, 2014 @ 05:21:58

    Yeah, I read this too and it was terrible. The heroine was annoying, smug and too perfect to live, the hero was horrible, abusive and a meat head, the writing was terrible and florid and I couldn’t work out what was going on half the time. Why do I read these horrible books?

  9. Morgan
    Apr 30, 2014 @ 13:00:09

    @Maura: Maverick Heart.

    It’s like a parody.

  10. Megan
    Jun 29, 2014 @ 13:47:37

    @Veron:
    I never and I mean never, have responded to a book review but I had to speak up on this one. I respect everyone’s opinion in reference to the book content but to criticize on the author because of the character’s inadequacy at clearing a room was a bit much for me.

    I am married to a man that is currently on the SWAT team in Las Vegas, NV. Next to LAPD, Las Vegas Metro is the only SWAT team in the country that functions as SWAT 24/7. All the members of the team are ex-military/Special Forces. If you think for a minute that they do everything perfectly, think again. If you think for a moment that internal turmoil doesn’t affect how they perform, think again. They have the highest substance abuse, divorce, and suicide rates of any profession. Oh yeah and the average life expectancy for an officer that actually retires is only 56.

    Most of these guys have a laundry list of issues and are not what I’d call the easiest guys to get along with. Being a spouse is particularly hard because it is difficult to penetrate the armor that they put in place to deal with difficult situations. Special Forces doesn’t mean perfect, it means determined. Reading about it doesn’t give you a real perspective or insight into these men and by the way “non-fictional” accounts read like movies. Most of the guys I know think those books are crap and the author of Lone Survivor many believe enhanced the story or hid to avoid confrontation.

    Coming from someone who is around these types of men a lot the author did pretty well with nailing the way some of them behave, not all but a good portion. Women tend to romanticize men in law enforcement/military professions and I’m here to tell you it really is a fantasy. They are great guys but do you really think anyone escapes war-like situations unscathed? And these guys are often on the front line. Think more Deer Hunter instead of Top Gun. Sorry for the rant but if you couldn’t tell some of these posts really struck a nerve.

  11. Megan Burton
    Jun 29, 2014 @ 13:48:25

    I never and I mean never, have responded to a book review but I had to speak up on this one. I respect everyone’s opinion in reference to the book content but to criticize on the author because of the character’s inadequacy at clearing a room was a bit much for me.

    I am married to a man that is currently on the SWAT team in Las Vegas, NV. Next to LAPD, Las Vegas Metro is the only SWAT team in the country that functions as SWAT 24/7. All the members of the team are ex-military/Special Forces. If you think for a minute that they do everything perfectly, think again. If you think for a moment that internal turmoil doesn’t affect how they perform, think again. They have the highest substance abuse, divorce, and suicide rates of any profession. Oh yeah and the average life expectancy for an officer that actually retires is only 56.

    Most of these guys have a laundry list of issues and are not what I’d call the easiest guys to get along with. Being a spouse is particularly hard because it is difficult to penetrate the armor that they put in place to deal with difficult situations. Special Forces doesn’t mean perfect, it means determined. Reading about it doesn’t give you a real perspective or insight into these men and by the way “non-fictional” accounts read like movies. Most of the guys I know think those books are crap and the author of Lone Survivor many believe enhanced the story or hid to avoid confrontation.

    Coming from someone who is around these types of men a lot the author did pretty well with nailing the way some of them behave, not all but a good portion. Women tend to romanticize men in law enforcement/military professions and I’m here to tell you it really is a fantasy. They are great guys but do you really think anyone escapes war-like situations unscathed? And these guys are often on the front line. Think more Deer Hunter instead of Top Gun. Sorry for the rant but if you couldn’t tell some of these posts really struck a nerve.

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