REVIEW:  One Night with a Hero by Laura Kaye

REVIEW: One Night with a Hero by Laura Kaye

Dear Ms. Kaye:

This book is a sequel of sorts to “Her Forbidden Hero” which I started but abandoned.  While I enjoyed One Night with a Hero and the characters, the execution of the plot was problematic. This book had three acts. Only the last one felt fully developed and even that one relied upon a reader to fill in the spaces between the text in order to for the character’s actions to be in any way believable.

One Night with a Hero by Laura KayeJocelyn Daniels is an orphan who works at an at risk youth shelter. Her dream is to have a family – the husband, the kids, the house.  It’s what she longed for as a child but was never within her reach.  Army Special Forces Sgt. Brady Scott ends up having a one night stand with Joss, as casual sexual encounters are all that he can ever emotionally handle due to abuse from his father. Brady is convinced he would be a terrible husband and a likely abuser as well.

The first act is Joss and Brady’s decision to have sex. The second is Joss’ pregnancy. The third is Brady’s emotional recovery from his father’s abuse. None of these seemed particularly resolved emotionally except for maybe the last one but so little time is spent on the three issues and they aren’t well blended throughout the story. Instead, each is segmented separately.

Joss and Brady have a one night stand. Brady then discovers that Joss is his neighbor and have another one night stand after which he treats her poorly. Joss recovers from this and plays the ministering angel when Brady is sick. Brady continues to play hot and cold with Joss until she discovers she is pregnant. Then he treats her really low. Somehow, miraculously after acting like an ass and getting a good talking to by a father figure, Brady gets his head out of his rear but something disturbs Brady’s near instantaneous emotional recovery and we lapse into act three which is Brady coming to terms with his father’s death.

I realize that the overarching character growth plot for Brady is always his struggling with the fall out of his father’s death, but the manner in which it is written from Brady coming to acceptance to instant reversal and then acceptance again had a very choppy feel to it. Even at the end of the book, I am somewhat unconvinced as to his emotional well being and ability to be a father or husband.

Joss is remarkably well adjusted given her life bouncing between foster homes and then getting played like a bad guitar by Brady. She repeats the mantra that no one wants her and maybe that explains why she melts into Brady’s arms repeatedly despite being treated poorly. However, if she really was that self destructive, past bad relationships should have pointed it out. Further, for a woman who wanted so desperately to be be a family, the lack of feeling she had toward a single male father in her life seemed odd.

Brady did have anger management issues and he never sought therapy for them and the way in which I am to buy that he worked those out, just didn’t come off as believable. Either he really did have a problem or the issues were artificially magnified for purposes of the conflict.

Despite the aforementioned complaints, the story was an easy and sexy read. C

Best regards,

Jane

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