Romance, Historical, Contemporary, Paranormal, Young Adult, Book reviews, industry news, and commentary from a reader's point of view

About Jayne S

http://dearauthor.com/author/jayne/

Another long time reader who read romance novels in her teens, then took a long break before started back again about 15 years ago. She enjoys historical romance/fiction best, likes contemporaries, action- adventure and mysteries, will read suspense if there's no TSTL characters and is currently reading very few paranormals.

Posts by Jayne S:

REVIEW:  For Your Eyes Only by Sandra Antonelli

REVIEW: For Your Eyes Only by Sandra Antonelli

Blurb

By day, Willa is a mild-mannered scientist; by night, she’s on the trail of stolen classified documents. Technically that makes Detective John Tilbrook on her side, but Willa has secrets she can’t share…

John is instantly fascinated by the new physicist on the block, even though Willa keeps her distance. A fan of coincidence and happy endings, John has plans for the secretive scientist with the wicked sense of humour.

But Willa has more than her heart on the line — her best friend is at the top of the suspect list for espionage, she’s having trouble leading her double life, and somehow her hair just turned purple. As days speed past, Willa’s life unravels as she struggles to come to terms with her unexpected feelings for a man she just met. John’s a big fan of happily-ever-afters, but will he believe in love and happiness when Willa divulges the real reason she’s in town? Will he break the law he’s sworn to uphold — for love?

Dear Ms. Antonelli,

I’m afraid this is going to come off a bit like “Jekyll and Hyde” review a book. There are parts of this book I really like and some that seemed aimless to me at the time even though they eventually all tie together. The destination was worth the trip but the ride sometimes got boring.

for-your-eyes-onlyAs with “Renovation,” I am delighted with the ages of these main characters. John immediately notices the fine age lines at the corners of Willa’s eyes and likes them. She’s got character and the wisdom of maturity and he’s the same way. They speak and make references that I grew up with – ABBA song lyrics, and 80s pop tunes – and they both think, as I do, that 8 year olds shouldn’t cake on eye liner and sing about their ass in their jeans. If that makes them – and me – sound like the “next stop is liver spots, incontinence, and dentures” so be it. I know these characters. They are me and I love reading about them as the hero and heroine and not as cute oldsters.

Another thing I immediately picked up on and wish there had been more of is Willa’s synesthesia. I first read about this years ago in an article in Smithsonian magazine and was enthralled. I wanted this too. To hear sound/voices in colors, for my letters and numbers to have color and feeling, to experience the world in such an unusual and fascinating way. The only other romance character I recall with it was in an old book called “Enchant Me Not” by Michele Hauf. So kudos to you for including this and for having it help Willa in her investigation. I just wish a bit more of how she sees life on a daily basis had found its way into the story.

Willa is a strong woman. She can change her own tires – well except for one stubborn lug nut – and if she needs help, she’ll ask for it, thank you. She’s a physicist too! An honest to God, works at Los Alamos, brainiac PhD. I wanted to stand up and cheer about the fact that she doesn’t turn stupid to get a man nor give up life goals. Part of this is that she’s past the age of having children and her idea of marriage and settling down is from the viewpoint of a woman approaching 50 but still, she’s smart and stays that way.

John is the starry eyed romantic of the two, the one who thinks in terms of “meet cute” and romcoms. He’s also almost endlessly understanding when Will tells him she doesn’t have the time for a relationship. John is a man of patience who knows who he wants – Willa – and is willing to put the time into getting her. I did worry at the end when he (finally) blows a gasket and wonder if all your heroes will end up doing this. But then it becomes clear – and you have laid the ground work for this – why he should be allowed to and that what he tells Willa doesn’t mean he doesn’t still love her. As John says, these are extraordinary circumstances, ones involving the FBI, classified documents and national security. In other words, not your every day conflict. Willa does tell him some stuff about what she’s doing but not everything. I can admire that as does John once he’s learned about it.

But as I was reading the book, I couldn’t help but feel that it’s told in vignettes which might be fun to read but which often appeared random and unconnected. I’d finish a section and think, “why is that here?” Why should I care about Willa’s contentious relationship with her step-daughter, the murder investigation John’s working on, Willa’s widowhood, or the fact that several men are falling in love with Willa? Eventually it did all make sense but I think readers need to know to stick with this story.

This book also has a lot more extra-romantical stuff than did “Renovation.” The investigation is a major part instead of mere background “white noise.” Willa and John spend a lot of time “on paper” apart because of it. It also comes complete with an alphabet soup of FBI agents. The stakes here make me glad I don’t deal with this level of classified stuff. Thank you for managing to keep it straight and fairly easy to understand even if I have no clue what Willa and her colleagues actually work on when they’re doing their physicist stuff.

My feelings about how to grade the book shifted as I neared the end. I loved that John brings Willa “back to life” and gets her to laugh again. I love that Willa inspires John to be the romantic hero it seems he’s always wanted to be and shows that nice guys can finish first. The resolution of the document leaks actually seems more realistic to me than a bunch of Black Ops crap. The angst and pain that they both go through on the way to a HEA – which I agree is better than a happy ending – feels like two mature people who have lived and lost and are delighted (and a little scared) to find love again. I just wish so much of the body of the book hadn’t seemed so random while I was reading it. B-

~Jayne

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REVIEW:  An Unexpected Wife by Cheryl Reavis

REVIEW: An Unexpected Wife by Cheryl Reavis

“Her Deepest Secret

Giving up her out-of-wedlock son was the only right choice. Still, Kate Woodward aches that she isn’t part of his life. She can’t heal herself, but she can help former Confederate soldier Robert Markham rebuild his war-shattered life. But helping Robert is drawing them irresistibly close–even as Kate fears she can never be the one he deserves….

Battlefield loss and guilt rekindled Robert’s faith and brought him home to Salisbury. And Kate’s past only makes him more determined to show this steadfast, caring woman that she deserves happiness. Now, with her secrets revealed and her child in danger, Robert has only one chance to win her trust–and embark on the sweetest of new beginnings….”

Dear Ms. Reavis,

An-Unexpected-WifeEver since I read “The Prisoner” and “The Bride Fair,” I’ve been waiting for Kate Woodard to get her HEA. It’s so good to see these characters again. All are recognizable but all show signs of recognizable growth: Maria and Max as a family, the townspeople in regard to the Reconstruction, Kate in her maturity as the spinster of the family and Robert in coming home and atoning for the pain he caused. I will say that your choice of hero sparked a lot of questions in my mind as to how you’d pull off his story. I also wondered why the blurb said Rob’s hometown is Atlanta. Note that I’ve fixed that in my version of the description. ;)

Perhaps I just need to read more contemporary inspies but most of them haven’t worked as well for me. Since this is – obviously – a historical the inclusion of faith as a major factor in the lives of the characters feels more “dyed in the wool” for me. It’s personal growth in faith and not REPENT YOU SINNER! It seems to flow naturally from their lives and circumstances and not be there to try and save me, the reader. I appreciate this.

Kate and Robert grow more over the course of the book. Kate in her knowledge – she can lay a fire now – and in the realization of how her son’s life will proceed best. Robert had to make amends to his family and the people who loved and mourned him or who think he hurt them and their loved ones. I like that Kate doesn’t seek forgiveness for her sin – she feels she might have sinned but her son isn’t a sin – but rather peace and acceptance of the things she can’t change. She’s endured the situation and lived weighted down under family expectations for so long but now she can find the freedom of telling someone else about her struggle, of sharing the burden with someone who is there only for her.

Robert sank under the weight of his own feelings of guilt and remorse following the death of his younger brother at Gettysburg. When faced with the unbearable pain of his physical and mental wounds, he retreated away from those he felt he had let down. Initially I thought I wanted to see more of Robert’s POV especially his reunion with several people – among whom is the sister who has mourned him as dead for 7 years and the mother of the woman he loved who blames him for what her daughter became. And then that woman herself. I mean, Rob left a trail of grief in his wake and we see almost none of what must have been some impressive Southern “giving him what for” meetings.

Then upon rereading parts of the story I came to realize that what must have gone on during these meetings is displayed and told by Rob during his sermon for the town. Instead of slinking around and only abasing himself and allowing himself to be confronted in private by those he did wrong, he goes a step further and lays himself bare before everyone. Since this is an inspie, using a church sermon as a way to tell people how he thought he’d failed his promises, how low he’d sunk during those lost years and how he found his way back to religion and afterwards home is perfect.

Are Rob and Kate right for each other? Yes, I believe so. They compliment each other and have found The One who will accept their imperfections as human beings while still supporting them. Neither is trying to save the other with religion yet they both find their way back to it over the course of the story. Rob trusts plain speaking Kate to tell him what he needs to know after so long away from NC and Kate discovers a man to whom she can reveal her past, who doesn’t load her down with how he thinks she should act or behave.

Meeting up again with the various townspeople, Occupational Army and Woodard household members was a joy. Seeing how the love between Max and Maria has deepened, how well Jake and Joe are, how ever efficient Sergeant Major Perkins remains and how much Mrs. Kinnard still strikes fear into the Union Army brought back old times and books. I also enjoyed spending time with Mrs. Justice and Mrs. Russell and a few new characters.

The wait to return to Reconstruction Salisbury and for Kate to find her someone was long but worth it. The choice of Rob, complete with all his issues, was inspired. Making the book an inspirational is a good fit with what Kate and Rob have endured and triumphed over. Dare I hope more books will be set in this world? B

~Jayne

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