Romance, Historical, Contemporary, Paranormal, Young Adult, Book reviews, industry news, and commentary from a reader's point of view

About Jayne S

http://dearauthor.com/author/jayne/

Another long time reader who read romance novels in her teens, then took a long break before started back again about 15 years ago. She enjoys historical romance/fiction best, likes contemporaries, action- adventure and mysteries, will read suspense if there's no TSTL characters and is currently reading very few paranormals.

Posts by Jayne S:

REVIEW:  Don’t Judge Me by Sylvie Fox

REVIEW: Don’t Judge Me by Sylvie Fox

dont-judge-me

So far, Raphael Augustine’s ten year career as a comedian consists of a lot of ones: one night gigs, one night stands, and one night in jail. But he’s committed to inking a successful TV deal, nonetheless. He’s not looking for a relationship and certainly doesn’t expect to have his briefs tied in a knot by a prim and proper woman from Connecticut.
There’s not much to laugh about in Daisy Fletcher’s life. She never thought an Ivy League degree would land her work as an adult webmaster. Years later, fake chat room dates are her only companions, and a failing business her reward. Her father always told her men only want one thing. By selling that one thing to virtual customers, she’s lost faith in the opposite sex.

After Daisy catches Raphael’s shirt during a striptease at a gay bar, she’s tempted. Can a rakish comic change her ideas about love and fortune?

Dear Ms. Fox,

In a world full of romance books on SEALs, billionaires and Dukes I love it when an author steps outside the ordinary and gives me something different. When I read the blurb and saw this would be about a stand-up comic with issues and a woman who makes her living funneling users to adult internet porn sites, I thought now there’s a book I want to try. While I appreciated the unusual livelihoods of Raphael and Daisy, ultimately I had other issues with the story.

The story jumps into gear with a fast start. Daisy needs more oomph in her business which is suffering from user ennui. No, it’s not that people have stopped using adult websites but as Daisy has found out, the demand and drive is for new, New, NEW faces and combos and content. Eventually that will come back to haunt her but tonight it drives her to beg her friend Nari to accompany her to a gay bar where she meets her catnip, Korean-American Raphael.

But Daisy thinks Raphael is gay (he’s not, but his brother is) though this misunderstanding avoids being milked for comic relief. No, it’s when Raphael is arrested for sex with an underage minor (turns out the girl is of age but barely) that the truth comes out. Meanwhile Daisy is crushing on Raphael’s Korean-ness. Lots of effort goes into Daisy telling us that she’s really not fetishizing but given that she keeps saying how attracted she is to Raphael because of his ethnicity along with her long term friendship with Nari, Nari’s family, and Korean food, I find it hard to believe.

But okay let’s move on to Raphael. He’s not the typical hero material if only because of the many ways he keeps screwing up. I’m used to a hero being humanized with one bad decision but sleeping with a barely legal female is only the start of his problems with other women. But for some reason, he’s still attracted to Daisy. When he discovers what she does for a living, he thinks he’s hit the jackpot of sex with a sexy woman who knows all about sex from her job. A terrible first sexual encounter with Daisy keeps his sexual scorecard in the negative.

Daisy’s best friend Nari has been desperately trying to get Daisy to quit her job but then Nari sort of disappears for sections of the story. Daisy really stretches their friendship to the breaking point when she pulls the stunt for her work videos at Nari’s house. Seriously, just washing Nari’s $500 bedding would never be enough to make up for staging a porn shoot there. Meanwhile, Daisy’s longstanding issues with her WASP family (including alcoholic mother) continue.

Raphael faces his own family problems with a father who has rejected his gay son and an immigrant mother who can’t or won’t stand up to her husband over it. He works his ass off to win a reality TV show that will get him a network contract and tries to work to keep Daisy in his life after never having to work to get any woman before. Will he be able to get her to leave her lucrative sex industry business behind and has 10 years of it warped her idea of sexual normal?

There’s a lot going on here. It’s edgy, it takes some risks with trying to make us like the hero after his sexual exploits. It deals with family logistics and immigration worries. It deals with Asian stereotypes while also exploiting them and then throws in some WASP ones as well. What was whole WASP aspect for? To show how Daisy learned her business skills from her banker father? To bring in the issue of her mother’s drinking? Just to show she has a flawed family too? And has Daisy’s view of sex and men been skewed?

The problem for me is that all of these things are introduced but few of them are carried to a end. The story builds up to a scene and then it’s over without us seeing how it resolves. At one point my notes say, “Back and forth again.” So many plot points get introduced but then sink without a trace.

Their relationship goes like a gerbil in a wheel. It just keeps seeming to circle around and doesn’t really get anywhere new until suddenly the book is almost over and both declare they love the other. I closed the book still feeling like they’re feeling their way through and not quite to the stage that is presented as done.

It did make me want to try all this Korean food. But I’m still uneasy about the way the book ends. I’m told that they’re in love and in a steady relationship but I think they’ve still got a lot of work to do and have some issues that I never really saw resolved. Perhaps that’s intended and this is a HFN, which I can see, but not quite a HEA. C-

~Jayne

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REVIEW:  A Home for Her Heart by Janet Lee Barton

REVIEW: A Home for Her Heart by Janet Lee Barton

A-Home-for-Her-Heart

Love on Assignment

Magazine writer Elizabeth Anderson has sparred with newspaper reporter John Talbot for years. Though they cover similar stories, John thinks Elizabeth’s writing is trivial, and she finds him too boastful. So when they must work together to investigate New York City’s worst tenement houses, they’re surprised by the great team they make.

Despite their professional rivalry, John and Elizabeth begin to trust each other as they grow from competitors, to friends, to something more. But then John makes a startling discovery that would break the story—and Elizabeth’s heart—wide-open. John’s always been driven by his career—can he give up one dream for another?

Dear Ms. Barton,

I enjoy reading the Love Inspired Historicals mainly for the unusual times and settings which are featured in them. There are only so many Dukes I care to read about and even Western gunslingers/sheriffs get too familiar after a while. After watching the PBS series on NYC which mentioned Jacob Riis’s 1890 book “How the Other Half Lives,” it was the tenement investigation in the blurb that caught my attention and made me decide to give this one a try.

While I had hopes for some hard-hitting journalism, the center and focus of the book was mainly on the life at the boarding house where Elizabeth and John both live. It’s a loving, almost family environment with a kindly owner and several very nice but ultimately mainly forgettable tenants. Mrs. Heaton does have her rules and PDAs are mainly limited to engaged couples and exuberance at baseball games while female residents aren’t supposed to be out at night alone.

The details about life there, in NYC and in the tenements are numerous and obviously well researched but there is a lot of repetition. Meals are described in detail, the heat, trolley transport and dinner, and nattering conversation. Some of this was pertinent to the plot while some, alas, was mere filler that I often skimmed.

Elizabeth and John have both had bad past romantic experiences. John got fired from his newspaper job due to the boss’s daughter leading him on while Elizabeth’s fiancé turned out to only want her for her family’s money rather than herself. Both now shy away from romance and have vowed to never risk their hearts again. Lest we forget that, this is mentioned in almost every chapter.

Since this is the second book in this Boarding House Betrothal series, the characters of another of your books are secondary ones here. As such, I expected some background information which I think, for the most part, is sparingly done. Readers who are new to this world, as I was, can start here and not be lost.

The investigative reporting is much more low key than I was hoping for mainly consisting of Elizabeth and John wandering around some tenement buildings, taking some pictures, talking once or twice with people there and then telling each other about searching for information at City Hall. John has one short dust-up with a manager and that’s pretty much all. To be honest, I was a bit disappointed in this. It did serve as a contrast to Elizabeth’s life of wealth but since she’d ditched all that in order to live her life on her own terms, even this part of the plot was dulled instead of hard edged. Eventually the investigation touched closer to home but the brief flare up of emotion and tension soon fizzled out as well.

So mainly this story just sort of drifts along at a leisurely pace. Two perfectly nice people finally really notice each other, begin to get along, have their momentary doubts and then happily fall in love. Some of the tenements are cleaned up, true love is found and lots of good meals are eaten at the boarding house over pleasant conversation. There’s nothing really bad about the book but it’s one I think won’t stick in my mind for long. C

~Jayne

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