Romance, Historical, Contemporary, Paranormal, Young Adult, Book reviews, industry news, and commentary from a reader's point of view

About Robin Reader

http://dearauthor.com/author/janet/

isn't sure if she's an average Romance reader, or even an average reader, but a reader she is, enjoying everything from literary fiction to philosophy to history to poetry. Historical Romance was her first love within the genre, but she's fickle and easily seduced by the promise of a good read. She approaches every book with the same hope: that she will be filled from the inside out with something awesome that she didnʼt know, didnʼt think about, or didnʼt feel until that moment. And she's always looking for the next mind-blowing read, so feel free to share any suggestions!

Posts by Robin Reader:

Tuesday News: New AT&T breach, Conan Doyle Estate pays up (again), Facebook now owns WhatsApp, and interesting analysis of piracy

Tuesday News: New AT&T breach, Conan Doyle Estate pays up (again),...

As per the notification, the employee accessed a master customer data base file called Customer Proprietary Network Information (CPNI) without proper authorization. This CPNI happens to be the master data card of a customer on AT&T network and contains all valid and valuable information about the customer. It is generated by AT&T once you buy any type of service from AT&T and the insider who carried out the breach apparently knew this. –Tech Worm

“[T]he estate was playing with fire in asking Amazon and other booksellers to cooperate with it in enforcing its nonexistent copyright claims against Klinger. For it was enlisting those sellers in a boycott of a competitor of the estate, and boycotts of competitors violate the antitrust laws.”

The circuit court applauded Klinger for acting, in effect, as “a private attorney general, combating a disreputable business practice—a form of extortion.” Judge Posner admonished the Doyle estate: “It’s time the estate, in its own self-interest, changed its business model.” –National Law Review

WhatsApp, which has more than 600 million monthly users, is among a new crop of mobile messaging and social media apps that have become increasingly popular among younger users. Snapchat, a privately owned mobile app that allows users to swap photos that can disappear after a few seconds, is raising money at a $10 billion valuation, according to media reports. –CNBC

People watch more paid, legal content than ever, but they also continue to download huge amounts of illegal content. “Piracy is putting pressure on antiquated business models, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing,” said Brett Danaher, an economics professor at Wellesley College who studies Internet piracy. “But the prevalence of piracy shows that people are growing up in a culture of free, and that is not good for the future of entertainment, either.” . . .

Content providers, Mr. Swanston [CEO of Tru Optik] says, will eventually have to consider new delivery models that are more closely aligned with how people behave. He imagines collaborations with streaming services to release content or simultaneously scheduling theater and digital streaming releases — ideas he hopes his company can help bring about. Some companies, like BitTorrent, which makes file-sharing technology, are already experimenting in this arena. –The New York Times

Monday News: The Turtles’s copyright case, discrimination suit against Nicholas Sparks, PW’s publishing survey results, and “motion as metaphor”

Monday News: The Turtles’s copyright case, discrimination suit against Nicholas Sparks,...

Music recordings produced before 1972 are not subject to the provisions of the 1995 federal law that makes digital radio services like SiriusXM to pay for post-1972 music they play on their stations. So now state copyright laws are being called upon to fill in this gap, and that’s an enormous problem, not only because of the differences among states, but also because all of this music has never been subject to royalties payments. And don’t we all know how disastrous attempts to extend copyright and trademark in other areas have been (Disney, anyone)?

It mean that companies could be on the hook for a new type of state-based copyright royalty every time they play a song that dates from prior to 1972. Worse, the rules vary from state to state. Depending on what courts decide, a radio station may have to pay in California but not in New York.

The quagmire gets deeper still because no one is sure if the DMCA (an important federal shield law that can give websites immunity for copyright infringement by their users) applies to state-based copyright action. Based on the logic of the SiriusXM ruling, record labels could now be in position to go after sites like YouTube or Facebook whenever people upload an oldie.

In this confusing legal environment, lawyers may begin advising media companies of all stripes to refrain from playing music from the 1950’s, 1960’s and early 1970’s. –Gigaom

Epiphany school is independent from official religious affiliations, but says its values and guiding principles are rooted in Judaeo-Christian traditions. Sparks, who was raised Roman Catholic, had his first Jewish protagonists in his 2013 book The Longest Ride.

Benjamin, who is of Jewish heritage and Quaker faith, believes that his efforts to make the school more diverse “enraged” Sparks and members of the school’s board of trustees. –The Guardian

Employees at publishing houses worked a little bit longer each week and made a little more money in 2013 than they did in 2012. Those were just two of the findings of PW’s annual salary survey, which was conducted this summer and which, for the first time, featured a number of questions on racial diversity in the industry. While it’s no surprise that the publishing sector is overwhelmingly white, the lack of diversity is a bit eye-opening: of the 630 respondents who identified their race, 89% described themselves as white/Caucasian, with 3% selecting Asian and another 3% indicating Hispanic. Only 1% said they are African-American. –Publishers Weekly

I think in movement terms. Human beings move on two legs across the floor, across the earth. We don’t do very much on the ground. We don’t have that kind of power in us. And we can’t go as fast as most four-footed animals do. Our action is here on our two legs. That’s what our life is about. When one thinks about falling, dying, or a loss of consciousness, this is a condition that is out of the normal range of human momentum. With jumping, although we all try to do it, we are again caught, because we can’t stay up there very long. So it becomes virtuoso. You know, when someone jumps high and stays long enough for it to register, it becomes a virtuoso feat. –Brain Pickings