Romance, Historical, Contemporary, Paranormal, Young Adult, Book reviews, industry news, and commentary from a reader's point of view

About Robin Reader

http://dearauthor.com/author/janet/

isn't sure if she's an average Romance reader, or even an average reader, but a reader she is, enjoying everything from literary fiction to philosophy to history to poetry. Historical Romance was her first love within the genre, but she's fickle and easily seduced by the promise of a good read. She approaches every book with the same hope: that she will be filled from the inside out with something awesome that she didnʼt know, didnʼt think about, or didnʼt feel until that moment. And she's always looking for the next mind-blowing read, so feel free to share any suggestions!

Posts by Robin Reader:

Thursday News: SCOTUS denies cert in Superman case, interview with Zane, Black women in British history exhibit, and Gif enhanced manuscripts

Thursday News: SCOTUS denies cert in Superman case, interview with Zane,...

That agreement was executed in the aftermath of Shuster’s death, when Peavy wrote to Warner subsidiary DC and asked the company to pay her brother’s final debts and expenses. DC agreed and also increased survivor benefits, but the company’s executive vp at the time, Paul Levitz, admonished, “This agreement would represent the author/heir’s last and final deal with DC and would fully resolve any past, present or future claims against DC.” –Hollywood Reporter

TR: Addicted pushed a lot of boundaries in its exploration of black women’s sexuality when it was released. How do you think the perception of black women’s sexuality has changed since Addicted came out?

Zane: I think women are more open about their feelings; they feel more liberated. I’ve had many women in their 40s and 50s tell me that they had never had an orgasm. Reading my books has made them open up enough to say what [they] want. If you really want someone to fall in love with you, the real you, you have to be transparent about who you are. And that includes your sexuality. There is nothing wrong with having desires—everybody has fantasies. –The Root

Now the organisers of an exhibition at the recently opened Black Cultural Archives (in Windrush Square in Brixton, south London) are hoping to skewer some myths regarding black life in the British Isles. The archives’ inaugural exhibition, Re-imagine: Black Women in Britain, has brought together a number of black women who made the country their home over the centuries. The stories of these women and their contributions to British life are a necessary corrective to the idea that we are somehow “new” to Britain. Consider Mary Prince, an enslaved woman from Bermuda – whose personal account of slavery was published in 1831, and was the first account of the life of a black woman in Britain. “I have been a slave myself,” she wrote. “The man that says slaves be quite happy in slavery – that they don’t want to be free – that man is either ignorant or a lying person. I never heard a slave say so.” She eventually lived and worked at the home of the Scottish writer Thomas Pringle, secretary of the Anti-Slavery Society. –The Guardian

Wednesday News: The Adobe Digital WTF Edition

Wednesday News: The Adobe Digital WTF Edition

Digital Editions (DE) has been used by many public libraries as a recommended application for patrons wanting to borrow electronic books (particularly with the Overdrive e-book lending system), because it can enforce digital rights management rules on how long a book may be read for. But DE also reports back data on e-books that have been purchased or self-published. Those logs are transmitted over an unencrypted HTTP connection back to a server at Adobe—a server with the Domain Name Service hostname “adelogs.adobe.com”—as an unencrypted file (the data format of which appears to be JSON).

The behavior is part of Adobe’s way of managing access to e-books borrowed from a library or “lent” by other users through online bookstores supporting the EPUB book format, such as Barnes & Noble. If you’ve “activated” Digital Editions with an Adobe ID, it uses that information to determine whether a book has been “locked” on another device using the same ID to read it or if the loan has expired. If the reader isn’t activated, it uses an anonymous unique ID code generated for each DE installation. –Ars Technica

Reached for comment, Adobe confirms that those data gathering practices are indeed in place. “Adobe Digital Editions allows users to view and manage eBooks and other digital publications across their preferred reading devices—whether they purchase or borrow them,” Adobe said in a statement this afternoon. The statement continues:

“All information collected from the user is collected solely for purposes such as license validation and to facilitate the implementation of different licensing models by publishers. Additionally, this information is solely collected for the eBook currently being read by the user and not for any other eBook in the user’s library or read/available in any other reader. User privacy is very important to Adobe, and all data collection in Adobe Digital Editions is in line with the end user license agreement and the Adobe Privacy Policy.” –Digital Book World

I have followed up on this story and looked into the earlier versions of Digital Editions, just to see how long Adobe may have been spying on users. After testing DE2 and DE3 I can report, and others can confirm, that neither app appears to be tracking my reading habits nor uploading details about my ebook library.

The older apps do send some information to Adobe, but the data packet is small enough that it can’t hold much more than info required to authorize the DRM. So if you need one of Adobe’s apps, you do have safer options than DE4. –The Digital Reader